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GENEALOGY 



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ALLEN COUNTY 



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PAST AND PRESENT 



OF 



Fountain and Warren Counties 
INDIANA 

JEDITED BY 

THOMAS A. CLIFTO N 

OF THE COVINGTON REPUBLICAN 



ILLUSTRATED 



1913 

B. F. BOWEN & COMPANY 

INDIANAPOLIS. INDIANA 



1490224 




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BIOGRAPHICAL 



ABNER GOODWINE. 

There can be no impropriety in scanning the acts of any man as (hey 
affect his public, social ai .1 business relations, so in this work w 
mention of worthy citizens of all vocations, and at tins juncture we are per- 
mitted to offer a resume of the career of one of the substantia] and highl) 
esteemed representatives of the agricultural interests of Jordan township, 
Warren county, Indiana, where he has maintained his home for 
and where he has not only attained a high degree of success in his chosen 
held of labor and enterprise, but also established an imperishable reputation 
for uprightness in all the relations of life. 

Abner Goodwine, who is a native son of the old Hoosier state, was born 
in Bartholomew county on July 10, 1826, and is therefore now in the eighty- 
seventh year of his age. He is the son of James and Sarah (Schumacher) 
Goodwine, both of whom were natives of Virg m'a. They were married 
after their removal to Bartholomew county, Indiana, and remained thei 
a short time, when they came to Warren com 7, arriving here in 1828. They 
located six miles northwest of Williamsport and made thai their home until 
the death of the father, who died in 1852. The mother died in 1871 in Jo 
Daviess county, Illinois. They were the parents of eight children, namely : 
Thomas, deceased; James; Harrison, deceased; John \V., deceased; Aimer, 
the immediate subject of this sketch; Elizabeth, deceased; Indiana, deceased, 
and Martha, deceased. The father of these children was a man of consider- 
able prominence in the early history of the county and served several terms 
as county commissioner. Me was a \\'hig in politics. 

The subject of this sketch was reared by his parents and is thus num- 
bered among the earliest settlers of Warren county. He has vivid recoilec 
tions of many of the stirring scenes of those early days and remembers when 
the Indians used to come to his father's cabin home, though they never caused 
them any trouble. Mr. Goodwine received his elementary education in the 
common and subscription schools of those early- days, which in both ccpiip- 
ment and methods were somewhat primitive. He earl)' became inured to lire 
hard lahors incident to opening up and preparing the land for cultivation and 

(22) 



338 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

he rendered valuable service in this way. His father's original home lead 
entries in Warren county had amounted to (luce thousand eight hundred and 
eighty acres. Mr. Goodwine himself is now the owner of three thousand 
eight hundred sixty-seven and a half acres, lying in Jordan township, Warren 
■county, Indiana, and Ross township, Vermilion county, Illinois. This com 
prises as fine a body of land as can be found anywhere and is well impn 
and in tillable condition. Mr. Goodwine has followed farming all his it: 
has been eminently successful, lie was not slow to adopt newer metho 
they were demonstrated by experience to be the best and he. has at ail 
shown a progressive spirit and a desire to maintain ins place at the highest 
sta: ird of excellence. 

Jn 1852 Mr. Goodwine was married to Barbara Pence, the daughter of 
George and Mary (Swisher) Pence. The Pence family were among the 
early settlers of Warren county, coming here in 1S3O, and members of (lie 
family have at different times been prominent in the public affairs of the 
county. They were originally from Pennsylvania and on coming to Indiana 
first located in Bartholomew county, later, at the date- mentioned, to Warren 
county. To Mr. and Mr-. Goodwine have been born twelve children, namely: 
George, deceased; Mary, the wife of William Himmelright; Newton (.'urn-, 
of Warren county; Belle, dei ' ' lizabeth, now .Mrs. Winegardner ; Clara 

Virginia, now Mrs, Craw ford; Frank S., of Ambia, Indiana: Olive, now Mr-. 
Heaton; Nora., formerly Mrs. Pugh, now Mrs. Lakin; Cora, now Mis. Driggs, 
widow; Leola J., at home; Harry M.. who was killed b) a horse. The mother 
of these children died on March 4, 1904, at the age of seventy-three years. It 
is rare that one meets with a family of men and women who evidence more 
of worth and ability than the sons and daughters of Mr. Goodwine, and not 
the least of his achievements is the rearing of this family and their upbring- 
ing to usefulness. Mr. Goodwine stands high among his fellow citizens, 
being an honest, kind and generous man who, while laboring in his own inter- 
ests, never neglected his duty to his fellow men. 



HON. ISAAC E. SCHOONOVER. 

Indiana has always been distinguished for the high rank of her bench 
and bar. Perhaps none of the newer states can justly boast of abler jurists 
or attorneys. In Judge Isaac E. Schoonover are found united many of the rare 
qualities which go to make up the successful lawyer and jurist. He possesses, 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIA .A. 339 

perhaps, few of (hose brilliant, dazzling meteoric qualities which have some- 
times flashed along the legal horizon, riveting the gaze and blinding the vision 
for the moment, then disappearing, leaving little or no trace behind, but rather 
has those solid and more substantial qualities which shine with a constant 
luster, shedding light with steadiness and continuity. 

Isaac E. Schoonover, of Covington, who is ably and satisfactorily dis- 
charging the responsible duties of judge of the circuit court, was born October 
22, 1849. n1 Warren county, Indiana, and is a son of Peter and Maria (Wake- 
ly) Schoonover. The subject's paternal grandfather was James Schoonover, 
one of the early and well-known residents of Warren county, where his death 
occurred. Peter Schoonover was a native of New York state, born on Jan- 
uary 1, j8oo. He then went to Warren county, Ohio, and then came to 
Warren county, Indiana, in about 1834, and here was successfully engaged in 
the pursuit of agriculture. 1 le w as a man of unusual mental ability and served 
one term as judge of the Warren count)' court. His death occurred on Sep- 
tember 17, 1867. The subject's mother was born in Ohio in 1814 and her 
death occurred in 1889. 

Isaac E. Schoonover was : eared under the paternal roof and secured his 
education in the common schools. At the conclusion oi his preliminary 
studies lie determined to take up the legal profession, and to this end he en- 
tered the law department of Michigan . tate University at Ann Arbor. Upon 
the completion of his legal course Mr. Schoonover located in Attica. Foun- 
tain count}', Indiana, and "hung out his shingle." Me soon acquired a gO< 1 
reputation as a careful and painstaking attorney and commanded a representa- 
tive clientage. He attained to an enviable position among his fellows and 
served as mayor of Attica four terms with entire satisfaction to his fellow- 
townsmen. In 1906 Mr. Schoonover's abilities received definite recognition in 
his election to the circuit judgeship and he has since presided over the judicial 
proceedings of the county in such a manner as to win the approbation of the 
bar and the appreciation of all litigants who have appeared before him. Years 
of conscientious work brought with them not only increase of practice and 
reputation, but also that growth in legal knowledge and that wide and accu- 
rate judgment the possession of which constitutes marked excellence in the 
profession. In rendering opinions he is noted for clearness of statement and 
candor and but few of the cases appealed from bis court to the higher courts 
have been reversed. His relations with the members of the bar have been 
most cordial and at all times he has commanded the sincere respect of all With 
whom he comes into contact. 

On March 18, 1869, Isaac E. Schoonover was united in marriage with 



340 FOUNTAIN AM' WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Marguerite Yeager, who was born November i_\, 1851, the daughter of John 
B. and Jane (Jefferson) Yeager. She received a good com 

ny estimable qualities of mind and heart. To the 
Judge and wife has been ■ tii > le child, Albei 1. a lawyer, who mai rit d Emma 
Green, and is now living rnia. They art Lin 

two 1 his, J ransel and -Mar 

Fraternally, | onover is a Mason and Knight of Pythias, be- 

1 _;:i;g to the local I ittica. liis religious faith i 

creed of the .Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is an earnest member 
Politically, he is a Democrat and has always taken an active interest in the 
success of his party. While at Attica, besides giving efficient service as mayor. 
he served as city attorney an : was also count) atti rney, these positions being 
but stepping stones to the exalted station he now occupies. Judge Sefo on- 
over owns one of the best : ington, where he now lives, and 
also possesses valuable city property in Attica. Of strong social instincts, he 
readily makes friends and is an a] circles in which he 
moves. 



DANIEL C. REED. 

The name Reed has long been connected with the development and prog- 

if the section pf In liana to which this work is related and the reo 
the family is one which reflects credit upon the state. Ii is a well-attested 
maxim that the greatness of a country lies not in the machinen, of govern- 
ment nor even in its institutions, but rather in the sterling qualities of the in- 
dividual citizen, in his capacity for high and unselfish effort and his devotion 
to the public welfare. In these particulars, those who have borne the above 
name have conferred honor and dignity upon their community and as an ele- 
mental part of history we are pleased to record a sketch of a leading represent- 
ative of the family with the object in view of noting his connection with the 
advancement of one of the most flourishing and progressive parts of the com- 
monwealth and affording an example worthy of emulation by the young man 
whose life work is largely a matter of the future. 

Daniel C. Reed, successful farmer, ex-legislator and member of the state 
board of agriculture, is a native of Fountain county, Indiana, having been 
born at Newtown, Richland township, on December ->_', 1871, and is descended 
from sterling pioneer ancestry. 1 lis paternal grandfather, Stephen Reed, was 
born in Loudoun county, Virginia, in December, 1791, being the son of 



Mil NTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES. INDIANA. 34I 

Joseph Reed, a soldier in the war of the Revolution. Stephen Reed was a sol- 
dier in the war of [812, in which he rendered valiant service for his country. 
He left Virginia for the then western frontier, floating down the Ohio river 
to Kentucky, where he lived until r8: i or 1828, when he pushed on vve.sl 
and established his permanent home in Fountain county, Indiana, thus 
among the earli< I ettlers here, the homestead being located about two miles 
isl of Veedersburg. He was twice married, his first wife being Eliza- 
beth Castlernan, the Castlemaris being a prominent Kentucky family, of . 
descent. To this union were born nine children, tour boys and five girls. 
Mrs. Elizabi eed died in 1842, ami subsequently Stephen 

Reed married for his second wife Sarah A. Finley. Stephen Reed died in 
July, 1&66, at the age of seventy-five yes . 

For extended reference to Joseph and Alary A. ( Young) Reed, parents 
of Daniel C. Reed, see their sketch elsewhere in this volume. 

Daniel C. Reed was reared under the paternal roof and he secured his ele- 
mentary education in the common sehools of Richland township, com] 
his studies in tiie high school at Attica, lie then became a student in Purdue 
University, which he attended | sever terms, but did not graduate. Me 
has always had a deep interest in practical agriculture and the scientific train- 
ing he received al Purdue only served to stimulate this interest. He is the 
owner of the old home farm at Newtown, comprising three hundred a< 
valuable land, also several other good (arms in Shawnee township, this county, 
to the management of which he devotes his attention, lie resides in an at- 
tractive home in Attica, but much of his time is spent on Ins farms, where he 
gives intelligent direction to their operation. He carries on general farming, 
raising all the crops common to this section of the country, and also gives con- 
siderable attention to the raising of live stock, which he has found to he a 
profitable source of income. He farms according to twentieth-century meth- 
ods and the results of his systematic and advanced methods arc seen in the 
splendid returns from the soil. That Mr. Reed's ability as an agriculturist is 
widely recognized is evinced in the fact that he has served several years as 
a member of the state board of agriculture, of which he is now serving as 
vice-president. Here he is rendering efficient and appreciated service to the 
state at large, his valuable knowledge and administrative ability being highlj 
valued by his fellow members of the board. 

Politically, Mr. Reed is a stanch supporter of the Democratic party and 
has taken an active and important part in the campaigns of his party. His re- 
ligious affiliation is with the Presbyterian church, to which he gives a liberal 



34 2 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

support. Fraternally, he is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons, be- 
longing to Lodge No. 105, at Attica. 

In 1898 Daniel C. Reed was united in marriage to Zeta Fowler, the 
daughter of Bryan and Catherine (Rowland) Fowler, her father being a 
native of Ohio, who came to this section of Indiana in a very early day, set- 
tling just south of Attica, where he followed farming. 1 See sketch of George 
Rowland, elsewhere in this work.) 

Mr. Reed Ins always commanded an exalted position in the esteem of Ins 
fellow citizens, and in 1907 he was elected a representative to the state 1 egis- 
lature where he acquitted himself in a manner highly cerditable to himself 
and honorable to his constituency, lie took part in the discussions of the legis- 
lative body and was a member of several important committees, where he 
rendered efficient service. In every avenue of life's activities he has done his 
full duty and been true to even trust. Personally, he is a man whom it is a 
pleasure to meet, genial, obliging, kind of heart and broad-minded, and he num- 
bers his friends by the scores wherever he is known, in his record there is 
much that is commendable, and his career forcibly illustrates what a life of 
energy can accomplish when plans are wisely laid and actions are governed by 
right principles and high ideals. PI:.- actions are always the result of careful 
and conscientious thought, and when once convinced that he is right, no sug- 
gestion of policy or personal profit can swerve him from the course he has de- 
cided upon. 



ROBERT E. RAY. 



The most elaborate history is necessarily an abridgment, the historian 
being compelled to select his facts and material from a multitude of details. 
In every life of honor and usefulness there is no dearth of incident and yet in 
summing up the career of any man the writer needs touch only the salient 
points which give the keynote of the character, but eliminating much that is 
superfluous. Thus in giving the life record of Robert E. Ray, editor of the 
Attica Tribune, sufficient will be said to show that he is one of the enterprising, 
influential and progressive citizens of Fountain and Warren counties. 

Mr. Ray was born in Hannibal, Missouri, famous as the boyhood home 
of "Mark Twain," on January 27, 1S56, and he is a son of John M. and Eliza 
M. (Summers) Ray, a highly respected old family of that city. The elder 
Ray came to Fountain county, Indiana, from Missouri in 18S5, when Robert 
E. was nine years old. The former was horn in Kentucky, as was also 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 343 

his wife, Eliza M. Summers, each representing fine old families of the Blue 
Grass state, and there they spent their earlier years. Upon removing from 
Missouri the family settled near Newtown, Richland township, and in that 
locality John M. Kay followed teaching for a period of forty years, becoming 
one of the leading and besl known educators in Fountain county during his 
day and generation, lie had previously taught in Missouri, and was il 
popular with both pupils and patrons. During the summer month- he d< 
his attention to farming. His family consists of nine children, namely: John, 
William J. and Murray are deceased; Martha. Thaddeus and Robert E . also 
Arch, the eighth in order of birth, are all living. Edward, the seventh child, 
and Nannie, the younj ih deceased. 

E, Ray, < E this review, grew up under the parental roof tree and 
received a good education in the common schools of Missouri and Indiana, 
partly in the high school at Attica He followed in the footsteps of his father 
in a professional way and began teaching when only sixteen years of age, and 
he continued in this line of endeavor for a period of eleven years, in a man- 
ner that reflected much credit upon himself and to the eminent satisfaction 
of all concerned, like his worthy father, his services' having always been in 
great demand. He kept well abreast of the times and was known in the 
school room as both an instructor and an entertainer. But finally tiring of the 
scho '1 room, he abandoned the same and to k up the drug business at V\ 
town, Indiana, later at Veedersburg, continuing in that vocation for about 
thirteen years, during which he enjoyed a large and growing patronage and 
earned the right to rank with the leading druggists of the comity. Then turn- 
ing his attention to the field of journalism, he has since devoted his at 
exclusively to the same, with very gratifying resu tablished the 

Saturday Press at Attica, which he placed on a firm footing, then sold it and 
established the Attica Daily Tribune, March 5, 1912. which was a successful 
venture from the fust and which has had a remarkable growth during its brief 
existence, its circulation increasing almost by leaps and hounds until it now 
covers both Fountain and Warren counties, which it seeks to serve with the 
biggest, best and brightest news of the day, and its editorial column is strong 
and convincing, potent for the general good of the community. The Tribune's 
mechanical appearance is all that could be desired and it has become a valuable 
advertising medium. It is indeed a power for good in this section of the 
state and is an influential molder of public opinion, always advocating what- 
ever is besl for this locality in a material, civic and social manner. The office 
of the Tribune is well equipped with modern and the latest approved appliances 
for prompt and high grade work, and the plant would be a credit to a town 



344 FOUfl . , i :m \N\\. 

fnuch larger than Attica, ft is owned jo ik, the 

former having charg< i I end of th ic and the lattei looks 

;i fter the busini ss department. 

Mr. R 
and Catherine Fralich, earl ai Evansville, 

long highly respected and influential; these parents are bot! 
[wife has been without i 

Politically, Mr. Ray is a Democrat and is lo; il party, lie is an 

■ : . . religioi ndencies, and, fraternally, he belongs to the 

Knights of Pythias, Lodge No. 95, and ' " 1 . Attica. 



VOLXJ-: PATTON. 

In the present sketch is r< ' istory of : 1 

of the oldest families of Fountain >unty, n 

uprightness and virtue. Of the good old Virginia native stock, his anc< 
came to this county when it ta wilderness 

immunity oi today. 

Volnej patton was 1 July 2 • the son 

of Willi ton. Thomas grandfather 

1 - '.. olney, was bon 1 1 n earl I lunt} . 

fndi ■ a, and at a later date, to Foui I i rtdiana, when his son Will- 

iam w.i- but tw ■ tnd a half years old I : atton entered land from 

ilu government at erne dollar and tw«nty-five cents per acre, and spent the re- 
mainder of his life in this county, of which he was a respected and influential 
citizen. Me accumulated a large amount of land. William Pattern was horn 
in Sugar Creek township, Parke county. He spent his life in farming and 
was successful in all senses of the word, being a man well known and well 
liked by all who knew him. 

To William and Deborah Pattern eight children were born: Volney; 
Sarah, who married Albert Hershberger, now deceased, and is now living in 
California; Nancy, the wife of Dr. Petit, of Veedersburg ; Edward, now post- 
master at Veedersburg; Morton, a farmer of Wabash township; Francis and 
Thomas, deceased; and one child who died in infancy. William I 'atton made 
most of the impovements on the farm on which his son Volney now lives, 
which adjoins the old Patton homestead, with its sturdy brick house, which 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 345 

has always been occupied by the Pattons. lie died m [906 and hii ivi 
in September, iSjj. 

Voliiey Patton had no edltcati 
liberal course of reading I an! He was 

married in 1873 to Hattie Fisher, a da ighter U known 

-iter of Covington, [ndiatta. Sb61 tughtfive.1 
in the vicinity of Covington before her marriage, a; i in thai respecl 

was a force for good in the lives u many . r citizens of thai 

locality. To this marriage were horn four children, Francis, deceased; 
Fannie, the wife of Marion Foxworthy. now an Indian agenl in Xorth Dal ita, 
formerly in the civil service at Washington; Katie, the wife of Butler I.: 
of California; and Madge, deceased. 

Mr. Patton is the owner of one hundred ai;d seventy-three acres 
in a high state, of cultivation, part of that which was entered by his grand- 
father. On this he engages in mixed farming, raising mail) cattle ami hogs, 
as well as grain crops, and has been quite successful, having gamed much 
knowledge of profitable fanning from hjs lifelong experience; He and his 
wife arc living .in prosperity and qukitjiess in the midst of their well-tilled 
acres, and enjoy the confidence, respect and friei , in 

well. 



THOMAS J. DOTSON: 

It is an agreeable task- for the biographer and 
the reader, to contemplate the life recor ha made a 

of life and won the confidence and res ct of his fellow citizens Such is the 
record, briefly stated, of the well known young business man f Vee 

of which city he is at present aMy disc 1 lutie or — Thomas 

J. Dotson, than whom a more highly respected 01 popul ir citizen it would be 
hard to rind in the locality of which this hook treats and where his life has 
been spent. 

Mi*; Dotson was bortl in this county on October 26, 1872. He is the son 
of Fran!, and Eliza 1 Reed) Dotson, both natives of Mason county, Kentucky, 
where they spent the earlier years of their lives, and from there they came as 
pioneers to YanBuren township, Fountain county, Indiana, and established 
the permanent home of the family, spending their lives in agricultural pur- 
suits. There were five children in their family, named as follows: Charles, 
who lives in California; lohn also resides in that state ; Mollie, who married 



346 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

William Lucas; Mattie is the wife of Joseph Williams; and Thomas ]., sub- 
ject of this sketch. 

The parents of the above named children are still living in Van Buren 
township, where they have a pleasant home. The) arc members oi 

tian church. The father is a Democrat, but has never been especially 
active in political affairs. He has been a member of the Masonic fraternity 
for the past fifty-three years. 

Thomas J. Dotson grew to manhood on the home farm and there he 
assisted with the general work during crop seasons. In the winter lime he 
attended the common schools of his native community, and in 1Q04 he came 
to Veedersburg and since that time lias been engaged in the grocery busil 
with ever-increasing success, having built up a large and satisfactory business 
with the town and surrounding country, carrying at all seasons a large and 
carefully selected stock of fancy and staple groceries. 

Mr, Dotson was married on December 23, 1895, to Belle Foxworthy, 
'laughter of Dan and Margaret (Colwell) Foxworthy. an excellent old fam- 
ily of this county. 

Politically. Mr. Dotson is a stanch Democrat and lie ha- been active in 
party affairs. For some time he served at a councilman at Veed- rsburg, and 
is ai this writing ven ablj discharging the duties of mayor ol this place, 
winning the hearty approval of all concerned, irrespective of party ties 
he is doing much foi lv ply interested 

in its growth and moral \\\ His term of office expires in 1913. Fra- 

ternally, he belongs to the Maso ic oi , the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and he is a member of the Commercial Club. He is a young man 
of pleasing address and is a good mixer, popular with all who know him. 



ELVIS SCOTT BOOK 

The prominence of Elvis Scott Booe, the widely known and popular 
president of the Bank of Kingman, Indiana, is such that he is regarded as one 
of Fountain county's leading business men and must influential financiers, 
having for several decades taken a prominent part in the upbuilding of the 
locality in a material and civic way, ever wielding a wide and potent influence 
for the general good of the same, and ever showing by his fealty to high 
principles that he merits the high esteem in which he is universally held. l\c 
is a man of keen business discernment, wise foresight and seldom makes a 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 347 

mistake. He has been the principal motive force behind the strong, conserva- 
tive and popular institution of which I, and at the same time is 
a plain, straightforward, unassuihing gi liom it is a pleasure to meet. 

Air. Booe was born in Po nty, Indiana, October z, i" ; 

vloffatl I Booe, natives of North 
;ivcly. each repre • 
families. These parents grew up in the South, were educated and married 
there, and they devi ricultural pursuits. They 

came to Fountain county, tndiana, as early as [827 and here became 
known among the pioneers. The paternal grandfather, . was 

one of t. ■ prominent men of the early period of the county's history. .Many 
of his sterling traits seem to have descended to hi - m, L irenzo Dow, and 
thence to the subject, Elvis S. Booe. The father of the subject settli 
Scott's Prairie, where he developed an excellent fai lie rest ol 

his life, successfully engaged in general farming and His death 

occurred on his home place in April, 1878, at the age of sevent) live 
His widow survived a number of yi ing away in 1884, at the 1 

seventy-nine years. They were it rig children 

M. is a retired farmi phine died in 

sixty-seven years; ' ; Illinois; 

John A. is a druggist I ' iana; Simpson M. died in [890; 

Elvis Scott, subject 1 jest of the children. The father 

of the above nam< 1 childrei tive in the affairs 1 icratic 

party, and for years h< con in the Christian church. 

Elvis S. Booe grew to manhood on the home farm and there he made 
himself generally useful during the summer months. Lie received his primary 
education in the common schools, then spent two years in Howard College. 
Kokomo, Indiana, and two years at the old Northwestern University, at Indi- 
anapolis, also two years at Wabash College, Craw fordsville. this state, mak- 
ing an excellent record in all these institutions and he was graduated from the 
last named with the class of 1877. He then read law one year, but not find- 
ing the calling espoused by Blackstone and Kent entirely to his liking he re- 
turned home and managed the farm, remaining there until the death of his 
mother and gaining a secure foothold as an agriculturist. In May, 1900, he 
came to Kingman and, with the exception of the year 1910, when he was a 
member of the state board of accountants, he has been engaged in the hanking 
business, being at this writing president of the Bank of Kingman, whose large 
success has been due principally to his able management. lie is also inter- 
ested in the grain business, and he has been wry successful in a business way. 



348 MN AND WARKEN 1 I 

Mr. Bo • ,\ on November 5, r888, to Ida Philp 

many estimable cliaracteristics and the daughter of Harris Philpott, a highly 
, '1 lirie. This union ha b< en bl< sed by the 
I the University 

Mr. B liberal suppoi 

he belongs to the Phi Delta Theta fraternity. Politically, he is a Democrat, 

is long been a nfluential in the rani -. Ele was 

the town board of Kingman for six year-, and in [885 he . 
-•rate Li - one term in a manner that reflected much 

Lipi I ' im If and Id the en i« . sati ■ ■ •' n of his constituents and 



flf::> eB 

it is : be adequately a man who has led an emi- 

nently has attained a position of relative distinc- 

tion in the community with which his interests arc allied. But biography finds 
itsmostperfi tg and recording of such 

a life history. I is, then, with a full appi 

1 h tatemi nt, a 
■ tion, that the writer essays th 
le detail ; the subject of this 

rev iew, Fletcher W. ; ' ■ 

Air. Boyd is descended from sterling ancestrj His maternal grand- 
father was William Y ntnt, who was a prominent and influential citizen in 
his day. He was an active Democrat in politics and at one time served as 
recorder of Fountain county. The subject's father, George W. Boyd, who 
also was a leading citizen of his county, having- served as sheriff, was a farmer 
and was also engaged in the mercantile business at Kingman. In politics he 
violated the family traditions and became a Republican and he was the first 
sheriff of Fountain county elected by that party. He voluntarily served all 
during the Civil war. as a corporal in Company TI, One I rundred Sixty-third 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry, refusing a commission, lie married Alnnda 
Vomit and they became the parents of six children, four of win mi are still 
living. The father of these children died on October 30, 1904, and his 
widow now makes her home with her son, the subject of this sketch. 

Fletcher \Y. Boyd was born February I, 1874, and lie secured his educa- 



FOUNTAIN AND WAUJ 01 349 

tiun in lating from the liigli school in 1894. He was 

a popular student while in school and was honored In el< :tion for four con 

the presidencj \iter leavi 

school, Mr. B03 engaged in teaching school, in whicl 
success, ba » ikki cuing 
ods. Ik- v. as early recognized as a young m 

[897, al the age of twenty-three years, he was appointed postmas 
Covington hy President McKinley. So satisfactor) 

isively reappointed to the position 
:ess qualifica- 

secure fi ir him. 

lor, who wa- 
i'd ana Sereld 
Taylor. 

ntial member of the Repub- 
lican p trty md has li « _ 

Fraternally, he is a mem] the fndependent On 

Fellows, 1 
] 1 1 econd 

last-n: med ordei ken a 1 

d as commander of tin 

Knights Ten plai r. r of the Meth 

Episcopal church. It is no t 1 1 . d one 

made they are always retained, lie and his ife move in the best social circles 
of the community and their home is noted for its hospitality and good cheer. 



the. duties of this 


office, that he was 


by Presidents Ro 


•sevelt and Tafi B 


tions and 1 


. 


popular with all ai 


tenure of his 


On Jul) 24, 


1 i [1 Boyd wa: 


horn on January 


5, [889, the daught 



JOHN HELD. 



Descended from honored ancestry and himself numbered among the lead- 
ing citizens of Warren county, Indiana, the subject of this review is entitled 
to specific recognition in a work of this character. A life-long residence in 
this county has but strengthened his hold on the hearts of the people with 
whom he has been associated and today no one here enjoys a larger circle of 
warm friends and acquaintances, who esteem him because of his sterling 
qualities of character and his business ahiiity. 

John Held is a native son of Warren county, having heen horn at Will- 



3^0 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

iamsport on October 18, [875. His father. Henry Held, was born in 1.S32 
ami died in [892. He was of German parentage and was one of tin 
settlers 1 E Warren county. The subject's mol maiden name was 

Helen Koehler, was born in Germany, emigrating to America in girlhoi 
locating in Warren county. To Henry and Helen Held born six ehil- 

dl < !!. Eoui DO] S and two girls. 

The subject of this sketch received his education in the public sen 
W'illi.i. luating from the high school with the class of 1892. He 

(her: entered the office of the Warren R view, where he was employed a year, 
at the <-n(\ of which time he entered the harness business of his father's e Late, 
igei holding this position until 1899. He then 
less in partnership with his brother Edward, this 
hen he sold his interests to hi- b 
Air. Held then entered the agency of the 
I shortly afterwards was promoted to the 
endent of the 1 ict,. neb ttating 

Subsequently 1 ned his connection with 

returning to YVilliamsport, he formed a partner- 
D. C. B' ' I he abstracting bui 

James ' '. 1 >dle in M iy, [910. On July 1, ii ■ : part- 

ner'^ inten si and has since conducted the same a 1 »ne, having met with very 
gratifying success from the ;tart. He i 1 a thoroughly reliable and 

accurate abstracter and has one 6F the best sets of abstract I ks in the 1 

He is accommodating and obliging and lie trial 1 frien if all who have busi- 
ness dealings with him. In examining the records of the county, Mr. Held 
has discovered many ver . interesting facts, some of real historical importance. 
concerning the early history of Warren county, especially regarding early 
land titles, pioneer settlers and former land values. Mr. Held contemplates 
taking up the practice of law- and to this end he is devoting his spare time to 
the study of law. 

On the 30th of August, 1898, Mr. Held was united in marriage to Belle 
Boggs, of Williamsport, who was bom on September 21, 1876. She is the 
daughter of D. C. and Mary C. (Schlosser) Boggs, both of whom were horn 
and reared in Warren count)'. To Mr. and Mrs. Held have been born two 
children, Lowell C. and John Earl. 

Mr. Held is deeply interested in public affairs and in politics he is 
aligned with the Progressive party. Religiously he is a member of the 
Presbyterian church. Plis fraternal relations are with Palis Lodge No. 202, 
Knights of Pythias, of which be has been keeper of records and seal since 



of which hi 




went into tl 




arrange ten 


t continuing 


who is still 


conducting 1 


Prudential 


Insurance C 


position of 


assistant si: 


his remova 


1 to Logans 


the Pr den; 


tial compam 


ship with h 


is father-in- 



FOUNT. MX AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. ; ,1 

1907. He and bis wife arc members of Lincoln Temple No. 213, Pythian 
Sisters, of which V Held is past chief. They arc both popular members 
of the best social circles of Williamsport and their home is a popular mi 
place for then friends. Mr. Held possesses business abilit) and, because of 
the high standard of his business dealing he has earned th ;ard of 

all who know him. 



ORLANDO S. DOUGLASS. 

No member of the Fountain county bai is more highly esteemed g< 
or stand, higher am ■" irofi n lb ethren than the gentleman ia 

name appears man's reputation is the pro] 

of the world, for the laws of nature ha isolation. Every human 

being either submits ence which touches, 

ols, ad successful in his 

ch sen field of endeavor, investigation will brighten his reputation and point 
the way along which other may foil iw with like success. Tin 
biography is to preserve th< be ticceed- 

ing generations ; thu; the I ' m ex- 

tent not superfi :iall) evident. ] In care r ?f Orlando S. Douglass, well known 
attorney al Covingfc 1, ttait ounty, i 

calculated to be an incentive to others, for his effi rl iavi t witl 
measure of success. 

Orlando S. Douglass is a native son of the Hoosier state, having been 
born in Rush county, Indiana, on December 29, 1858, and he is the son of J. 
W. and Nancy M. (Glass) Douglass. The father, who was a farmer by pro- 
fession, was also a native of Rush county and was a man of good standing in 
his community. 

The subject of this sketch received his preliminary education in the pub- 
lic schools of Champaign, Illinois, and in 1878 he came to Covington, Indiana. 
Having determined upon the practice of law for his life work, Mr. Douglass 
entered the office of Schwin & Booe, where he gave earnest study to Black- 
stone, Kent and ofhci legal authorities fur several years, being admitted to 
the bar of Fountain county in 1886. He at once entered upon the active 
practice of his profession in Covington, to which he has since given his atten- 
tion, with very gratifying success. From January, 1891, to January, 1896, 
Mr. Douglass, in company with John P.. Schwin, engaged in the publication 
of the Covington Friend, a Democratic newspaper, hut, aside from this 



352 FOUNTAIN AND WAR] DIANA. 

n, Mr. Douglass ha applied himself unremittingly to the pni I 
profession and allied lines. During the past fifteen years he ha: given 
siderable attention to the abstracting bui 
careful and accurate abstracters in 

On June 12, r88c>, Mr D - united in marriage with Kate E. 

Fields, the daughter of Samuel and Rebecca (ClelandJ Fields. She \va: 
in Foil Li 1 ' tin •. Indiana. To them have been born 

ret and Cleland ('•., both of whom are at home with their pan 

\&t. Dougla i; ned with the Democratic party, to 

w hich he has given his eai las 

to pi tic 1 I re with the Free and Aco 

Mi" ■ gton. 

not only in a pi way, but 

from a i laterial stai o, and is the owner of me hundred and sixty- 

four acre- of splendid land in Mound township, Warren county, which is well 
rtd which he has leased oul The Farm is located four mile 
His attractive and comfortable 1 

! I ality is always in evidence. 

In Mr r« found united those qualities which go to the making of the 

11 se of a practice hen 

n il only his full shan 
busini > the ountj but, wha value to a man, the sincere respect 

and friendship of those with whom he has been brought into contact. Genial 
and unassuming in manner, he easily makes friends and always retains them. 



SAMPSON REED. 

In the death of the honored subject of this memoir, on March 9, 191-', 
at his home in Covington, Indiana, there passed away another member of 
that group of distinctively representative business men who were the leaders 
in inaugurating and building up the financial and commercial interests of 
Fountain and other counties in western Indiana. His name is familiar, ma 
alone to tlfe residents of the city to whose development he contributed, but to 
all who are informed in regard to the history of this particular section of the 
Hoosier state. He was identified with the growth of Fountain county for 
many years and contributed to its material progress and prosperity t" an ap- 
preciable degree. He early had the sagacity and prescience to discern the 




^^Jsl-> 1 1/ ^Sfe /C J&UL 



F01 N I Alls' AND WA1 I 353 

eminence which the future had in store for this greal and g tion of 

the comraonv ealth, and, ■ tates of faith and 

judgment, lie rea] 

the just recoi ible industry, ity 

si ve enterprise. Greater fortune 

iivi - fi-.i nisli »p -Miking an exan | 

principles and safe conservatism as does his. The story of his su 

n 1] does it contain any exciting chap 
valuable ity which 11 records ; hi 

life are replete witl matter how lacking in dramatic 

action. The record of a noble life, consistent with lilities 

in every direction. 

■ m Reed w as a of dart o nmtry, 

having been u Flem 

of Febi time oi his death in the 1 

seventh 1 in a family of nine 

children, four boys and five 

Reed, the Castlemans being a prominent and -well-la 

of Scotch 1 hen R< ed, in 1826, 

■ ma, the hoi - h in a 

wagon, the subject of th : ~ sketch 

rode horse ' tied on what lias . 

since been kit arm, 

ersburg. Here, amid pion nily was reared. 

Sampson, as soon as old enough, took a hand in the onerous labors attendant 
upon the opening up of a frontier farm, and here, an. id thi 1 ' pri 

vations of pioneer life, he formed the habits of industry, perseverance and 
economy which were the keynotes to his success in later life. Mrs. Elizabeth 
(Castleman) Reed died in 1842, and subsequ itly Stephen Reed married for 
his second wife Sarah A. Finley. 

Sampson Reed secured his education in the primitive common and sub- 
scription schools of the period, which, however lacking in advanced educa- 
tional facilities, which characterize the schools of today, nevertheless were 
generally presided over by masters who succeeded in not only thoroughl) 
teaching the rudiments of knowledge, but also inculcated in then pupils prin- 
ciples of character which had a hearing on their entire lives. Young Reed 
followed farming during the first active years of his life. He remained on 
the old Reed homestead until about 1858, when he located near Waynetown, 
and still later moved to Tippecanoe county, this state. In [868 he located in 

(23) 



354 I sl: < AND W \KKK\ COT NTIES, INDIANA, 

Newtown, Fountain county, and in 1870 he came Lo Covington, with 
citj !. ■ . 1 literward closel) identified. He began e in ihe 

bankii I [ < f. G. Ha iployi 

private banking firm of J. G. I [ardy & Com] 
J. G. I tardy, Samp 
binatii n and they continued 1 

lissolved •• engaged in bti sim If. under tin 

■ ens Bank, of which he was president and which he contim 

ime of his death. A half-brother, Worth Reed i: now at the 
d of I this work }. 

[1 bai inj in le Sampsi •>< Reed \va I a matter 

of common knowledge thai his business principles were such thai no man 
ever lost a dollai by entru ting him or following hi: na ce He was 

a man of positi human nature, rarely making a 

mistake in h > 

friend a man in m but I - had on] 

for an; 

pn inently suci ful in his bi 

substantial bi 
ch his bankii . he was the owner of much val- 

I iiul. hi his dea 
; bsl tntial and high 

ly earning even dollar in his 
possi - : m, h< ra iked with the ; ; pi » 

peers and he won e] utatii n which | lai ed him am 

sentative citizens of his communi y. 

On Ma) 7, [857, Sampson Reed was united in marriage with Elizabeth 
Brant, who passed away March 19, 1910. No children were born to them. 

Politically, Mr. Reed was a stanch Democrat all his life, believing firmly 
in the principles of the party, and, though himself no seeker after public 
office, he took a keen and intelligenl interest in political affairs. Religiously, 
he retained a leaning towards the Methodisl Episcopal church, of which at 
one time he had been a member, and his funeral services, which, in accordance 
with his desire, were brief and simple, were conducted by the pastor of the 
Methodist church. Fraternally, he was a member of the time-honored order of 
Freemasonry, the sublime principles of which he exemplified in his daily 
life. His remains were temporarily interred in a vault in Mt. Hope cemetery, 
being later placed in the splendid granite tomb erected by the executors of the 
estate, where rest also the remains of his wife. 



,1 N AM) WAKKKN < ol VI'IKS, 



it can be truth full) said ' thai in even n 

he was true to every trust and the man) tributes to his high tanding in the 

world of affair; and as a man and citi i • ■ > the high place h< 
the esteen i ,\ ho kne^ him. 



r. 11. McGl i >RGE, J 



ffairs that make 

nl il fa toi o1 thi body politic 
is one of the leading business 
filled with eminent satisfaction 
and as such it is proper that a 
itive citizens of 



pi uieei familK and is a w orthy natn : - 

volume, his birth having occurred .ion, Fountain county. In 

August 19, :■ 1 S6£ •: : ': ■ is the oh of 1 

( Stewart) . McGeprge. The ather; v , in the year 

[832, and the mothei ivas . nati I s state The elder 

rge came to Indiana when 1 and ■ [earned the 

mechanic's trade in his youth, established a Foundry at Covington in [856, 
which he operated successfully until 1S7X, building up a large patronage and 
doing an excellent grade of work. However, upon the last mentioned date he 
began in the farm machinery and implement business, in which he met with 
a large measure of success from the first, and which he continued until his 
death in 1906, at the age of seventy-two years. He was an excellent business 
man and by close application and good management accumulated a competency, 
in fact, was one of the leading men of affairs of his day in this locality, and 
wielded a potent influence in public affairs, doing much for the early devi lop 
ment of Covington. Being a public-spirited man, his support could always 
be depended upon in furthering any laudable movement for the betterment ol 
his town and county, giving freely of his time and means. Me was a man 
of honorable character and obliging nature, and many charitable acts could 
be related of him. 



356 F01 NTAIN AND WAU1 COl INDIANA. 

To T. II. Md orge, Sr., ere born five children, three sons 

! d is follows: Alice, who re ide< at El Cainpo, I 

remained in 1 ina; lsa is a resident ol 

Colorado; T. H., Jr., oi ' 1 is deceased. 

T. H. McGeorge, }\\. spent his boyhood like most youths ii 
between a quarter and a half century ago, and. he received a good, practi 

ion in the common and high schools of bis native town. Ih- has spent 
letter opportunities existed for him right 
at Ins own door than were to he found in some remote locality to which the 
wanderlust spirit directs -< 11 youths who had better have remained 

at home. After leaving si business 1 ith his 

father, and, being a willing worker and a keen observer, he .soon 1 

of the implement business, literally growing up in the same, so 
that his pronounced success in this line in later years was a matte, of course, 
in fact, he has nevi 1 ,. any other business, having to full 

management her, the firm 

name having bei en T. ii. McGeorge, Jr., & Company, being capital- 

ized at seventeen thousand dollai n< wn of its k \ 

rn Indiana and it draws its hundn 1 itory, 

covering the major portion of four count I farming machinery 

carefully seld rie . and. the farm 

that :*here. may be purchased ever; 1 hand- 

man at a reasonable price, t he 

courteous treatment possible, remains a continuous customer. Mr. McGeorge 
is fust vice-president oi the Tri-State Implement Dealers Association. 

Mr. McGeorge was married in 1891 to Elizabeth Slattery, daughter of 
John and Elizabeth Mc( ato I Slattery, a highly respected family who came 
to Covington in the sixties audi here became well established. Mrs. .McGeorge 
grew to womanhood here and received a good education in the public sell il 
The union of the subject and wife has been blessed by the birth of five chil- 
dren, three of whom are now living, namely : Luke E., who is at this writing 
a student in Purdue University . at Lafayette. Indiana, in his sophomore year; 
he is taking the electrical engineering course and is making a fine record; 
Richard Hugh is attending the high school in Covington; John R. is a pupil 
in the home graded schools. 

Mr. McGeorge has been very successful as a busini ss man and has become 
one of the substantial men of his county: besides his large and modern store, 
he has art attractive and commodious home, in the midst of pleasant surround- 



FAIN AND WA1 l"IES, INDIANA. 357 

ings. His place of business is at the southeast corn 
square, llis home is on Fourth street. 

Politically, Mr. Mi ( . been a leader 

in local affairs as affecting his p; rty. He wa 
filling th finer that reflected much credit upon him 

tin.- sal 

Hi hi high standing in the city of his residence. He wa 
and is now third year in tl 

. mosl progressive and able chiej execu- 
tives that the city has known in all her ' 

the people and delighting ii native community, always stand- 

ing ready to support most heartily an 
civic or moral uplift of the 

Fraternally, Mr. M : ■ ninent, holding mem 

with th rd< i . the Kni ed Men 

and the Independent Order 

Hon. 
for th, nen and tvelfa o th place of his birth, 

wink- laboring for his hulivii i il it, a jht for 

■ t& da Gifted fcr 

f good. ] 
firm and unflinching character, but ah 1 with 

[uity. 



GEORGE B. PAVEY. 



In these days of large commercial transactions, when credits cut a large 
factor in the daily round of business, the province of the hanker is very wide 
and very important. The excellence of the banks of the present as compared 
with those of the past gives to all classes of business men first-class seeurin 
for their deposits, assistance when they are in need of ready money to move 
their business, and a means of exchanging credits that could be accomplished 
in safety no other way. In a large measure the success of the present time 
in all brandies of business is largely the result of the present hanking methods. 
Ji is quite common for the stockholders of hanks to be business men of 
prominence in the community, — farmers, merchants, manufacturers and pro- 
fessional men, — all of whom are known to the depositors and their standifl ; 





the 1 




. and 




nfklenc 






Ihc LI 


ank of ( 




Fo 


mitain 


C '1! 








\ . i: 


! 














hei 


re hi 














lie -' 






i an 




iii Pa 






y in 


]S 


54, and 


the 





358 K(ir.\ 1 COUNT! tND 

well established. This gh < 
munit) . Such is thi 

M r. I 'avej was bi irn in thi 
date oi his b 
(Wyl ■ I a 
birth occurred in Fountain county in i\ 

The p lei ] I Xorth Caro 

lina. He came to Fountain cou ity, n the 

\ oted hi lif< Li gi neral pioneer si ttlers. 

I j it S' >n, John Pavey, was also a farh : ursuit 

ounty, dying here 1 I to the 

■ by his wife only a , . inber 27th oi 

the same year. He was a man of high I id was 

in the work of the Grange Alliance. His 
children, nine of whom arc still living, nan 

live in this county; George B., oi Barton B. ; Sara married Daniel 

A. Hobson, anil they live in Full : this county: Irvin, Lucy, Lillie, 

Susan. Theron, deceased, Rosy, de lied in infancy. 

Georg : I omefara ted w ith 

.■ neral work vvl 

taj n excellent ed ; it thi ii" the 

normal school at Co 1 
Indiana, lie had carefull} prep; 

with much success for a period of eleven years, his services being in 
demand; however, he confined his teaching to Fulton township, this county. 
He gave eminent satisfaction to both pupils and patrons. He took a 
deal of interest in public affairs and when but a young man was elected town- 
ship assessoi of Fulton township, which office he held for five years'; he was 
then elected township trustee and was incumbent of this office for four years, 
having been elected in 1900 and serving until 1905. In both these offices he 
gave entire satisfaction to the people, irrespective of party alignment, being a 
careful, painstaking, and courteous official against whose record there never 
was any suspicion of error, wanton or willful. After his term of office had ex- 
pired in January, 1905, lie moved to Gaits and engaged in the hardware busi- 
ness for a period of three years, during which he built up a large trade with 
the town and surrounding country, and he still retains an interest in that busi- 
ness, which is managed by his brother, Allen Pavey. When the Gates Bank 
was organized in 1907, with a capital stock of ten thousand dollars, the sub- 



FOUNTAIN A XI) V- VRHI N' COi DIANA. 

ject becam 

ing his du ies in a manner 

Mr. Pa rried on September 22. 1892, to Viola I 

ter of Freema h her falb 

1 .i.l\ si tit > tbere. One child ha: subj 

•a ife, Earnes ... u ime. 

. M . iblican and lie has long be 

the ranks of his party and is influential in the same. Frati 

[f-n 
is desi 1 \ ing of a great deal of credit for what he has 

persistent effort along legitimate lines. 



iGE ROWLAND, M. D. 

The physici 1 mil 

ies of head am ic curriculum of the schoo 

practi- 
■ 
mind . 1 honest, ea 

n hi « hand with skill and abb 

num. 

these necessai ipplica- 

ti m to hi pn al luties is buildin putation and draw- 

in;; i- 1 himself . larg< and remunerative patronage. 

George Rowland, who occupies a leading position in the medical pro- 
fession at Covington, Indiana, was bom at Hillsboro, Fountain county, Indi- 
ana, on April 19, 1840, and is the son of Dr. Thomas and America ( Mclntyre ) 
Rowland. The subject's paternal grandfather, George Rowland, lived in 
Loudoun county. Virginia, but died in the city of Washington, where he was 
buried, lie was a veteran of the war of 1812. in which he served about two 
years. Thomas Rowland, the subject's father, was born in Virginia July 25, 
1810. .After completing his common-school education, he began the study of 
medicine with Doctor Crawford at Robroy, Fountain count), and later entered 
upon the active practice of his profession al Hillsboro, where he was held in 
high regard. His death occurred on August 21, [864. The subject's mother 
was born in 1836 in Washington county. Indiana, and was the daughter of 
Major Robert Mclntyre. 



360 D RHEN COUNT! 

graduating f ron . 

in Ber 
of medicine under the direction of 1 her, with whom he rem 

He then en . oi iti, 

I the medical d 
Arbor, where he was 

1 1 
lectures in tl , ■ 

ated in February, 1 H< 

iree thousand I 
thus engaged • the settlement of the estate am! i i 

of his pro- 
:si on at CI a remaining there un I 

'" re he has long occuj 
1 

I >r Rowland 
diveri '1 lis profession ami established tin 

1 en, namely : Via 
Keev< r Vashington, ] 

who is acting auditor ii 
child, Mary M died in infanc) . 

Politically, Doctor Rowland is a Democrat, but, though keenly interested 
in 1 he success of his party, he has never sought political office, liis r< ' 
faith is that of the Catholic church. The Doctor has a pleasant and attractive 
home and has recently erected a new office building adjoining his home. I [e 
has a good and up-to-date library of medical literature ami keeps closely in 
touch with the latest advances in his profession, lie is highly esteemed 
throughout the community. 



DAVID A. WATTS. 



One of the best remembered men of the past generation in Fountain 
county, Indiana, whose memory is revered by a host of friends and ac 
quaintances among whom he labored, was the late David A. Wails, who pei I 
his energies through a life of strenuous endeavor to make the m 
opportunities as well a best he could his neighbors and friends to 



... . 



a&^,J ,':/,- ■ 



i I MX AND WARREN COUNTIES, IND 

improve f if condition. In all th relations of life he proved signally true to 
every trust. He 
titude to tho 

was known as a cai : nan and one whose integri 

[tiesti' in. 
! )a\ id A. W ne farm whei 

ClVtl : 

James ■ . 

both ] 

n North 
ber 24, [826, and when eli ti ill brought by hei | 

tain county. After marriagi two years in ] irke county 

and in II illy he became the 

fiuni d 1 tw< nty acres of goad land. : 
. which he carried on in connects ofked at that 

To him and his wife were bom .six chil- 
• 1 

James ' , and afterwards a I Relig- 

Christian chun h, a 

H anagen ■ ■ mi 

well-to-do and enj ' gree tin- confj 

The Watt-: family i 

Penhsyh 

education, having secured his 
ntary learning in the common schools, after which he became a student 
in the Valparaiso Business University, but, because of the illness of a hrother, 
he found it impossible to complete the full course there. He returned home 
and from that time on he devoted himself assiduously to (he vocation of farm- 
ing and stock raising, in which he met with a very gratifying measure of suc- 
cess. As a farmer he was energetic and practical in his methods, bei 
erally looked upon as one of the best farmers in his section of the county. He 
was a splendid judge of live stock, in the raising and handling of which he 
was more than ordinarily successful. At the time of his death, which oc- 
curred at his home in Mill Creek township on July 28, 1886, he owned I wo 
hundred and forty-two acre- of as good land as could he found in the town 
ship, it being well improved and very productive, Air. Watts being progressive 
and up-to-date in his methods of cultivation. 

On March 10, [880, Mr. Wafts was united in marriage with Mary E. 



3&2 R)l r.MK AND WAI 

I , 

mnd 

I 

i 
remains al home with her moth< r, 
ell ..i ated in music. 

h 
th'i iccess 

h the New Light branch oi i 

a tea ler. u was a member of the Free an 

id in his i 
ordei \ ■ 

ell in- 

' ■■■ md hi- 

ll with 

I 

I honor, il 
sid< f ever tion with \ 

d his 
individuality upon the community as an enterprising, large-hearted, pro 
sive American citizen of the best type, while among his immediate friends he 
will always he remembered as a man without pretense and a courteous gentle- 
man whose integrity would hear the closest scrutiny. 



It is interesting to 
of a community, to not 
to take cognizance of thus 
vancement have rend 
consideration. Char 



CHARLES 


M. 


BER1 


IY. 














ite from tin 


beg 


inning 


the g 


rowtr 


i i 


aid 


d( 


veb 


ipmenl 


the lines all 


mg 


which 


progi 


ess h; 


is 


bc< 


■n 


ina 




se whose ind 


Listr 


f and 


leadei 


ship i 


:i 


the 


W( 


irk 


of ad 


possible the 


pres 


ent pr 




iy of 


11 


ie 1' 


xa 


lit} 


undci 


VI. Berry, e 


ditor and 


prop 


i iefr ir 





f i 


he 


N, 






'^■' £j 



CHARL1CS M. BERRY. 



I ( I 

popular independent newspaper 

of the mi o 
and moral 

i 

h ; i I taternal 

Fn in 

•neral i |a 

A Bei 
in the p life lie detenu 

d Rush Medical C i 
I le practiced his profession 

his life, dying in the year iN'>5- 
Charles M. Berry 

Coll 
tna. He .entered the alism early in 1 

• 

promisi ■ of 

•..■■'. 

h an 
field of infl ion until it is 

now ,i mlder ol public 

opinioi tate. It has a bright, up-to-date mechanical 

appearance and its columns teem with the most important news of the day and 
its editorial columns are logical and convincing. It has long advocated 
needed reforms and public improvements in this locality. 

Mr. Berry was married, first in 1892, to Lottie M. Mitchell, daughter 
of Robert Mitchell and wife, of Kokomo, Indiana. Her death occurred on 
January 5, 1911. Subsequently in that year Mr. Berry married Bea 
Howard, daughter of Elmer Howard and wife, of Aitica. Mr. Berry lias 
one son, James E. Berry. 

Politically, the subject is independent, and he advocates men a 1 
ciples rather than party. Fraternally, he is a Ma ;on. 



364 

WILLIAM 13. GR \.Y. 

The I . :i communil 

the li 
ndeavor and itid 

pi 
will be i 

' : i S COl 

t busi 
him delighl I 

Willian 

town 

I I 

l 
er was born in Montgon . John 

K. Gray accompanied his parents to Indiana 
aianh ted', and 

• 

h 
with who n he came m in the vicin 
VVesle ihood in her n 
ai d ] tion in the common schools and upon reaching woman- 
married John K. Gray, this union resulting in the following issue: Will- 
iam 11, subject of this sketch; James J. died in childh 1; Mary E. m 

William Temple, a horse dealer of Wingate; Sanford died when twenty- 
four years of age; Lulu died when nineteen years old; Ml I lives 
at Ladoga: Ethel C. died when twenty years old. 

John K. Gray was first a member of the Methodi E] pal church, 
afterwards joining the Christian Union, lie is a Democrat, and he b I 
to the Masonic order. 

William B. Gray received his education in the comiw ch ils al Wes- 
ley and Waynclown, later attending the Ladoga Ni 

University at Lafayette, Indiana. After leaving scho id farm 

ing for a period oi two years, but not finding hn ban y 1 nl 1 1; to his liking 
he abandoned the same and turned his att< ntio 1 to merchandising, operating 
a store with much success at Waynetown for two years; then he wenl to 



DIANA. 

Veedersburg, where h 

luring which time hi enj iyed a I 
the surrounding countt 

i 

courteous tre; 

ubl 
lit, his li i ] ratic ] iliar I 

public trust, v 

d i 
made such a commendable rec< 1904. During 

e-rms he did much for the and in 

he was elected county audil unty, and in 

re-elected for four years, having given emin< i 
and he ibeni 01 this office. As a public >ervanl he di 

duties in the same careful and able manner thai lias characterized his | 

less li fe. Long man 
captain of Company K, Third Regiment Indiana National Guard, hi 
i" .wo yea s, then for a period of three ■ 
my C, First R fnd ith the 

rank of major on ;'■ of Brigadi 

i kno ■ ■ be a careful, : 

p 
troops, and if occasion for active 
who know him best predict a brilliant career fot 

rnally, Mr. Gray is a Mason, heloi I Arch chapter, 

and the Vncient Arabic Order of Nol le 

member of : its ol Pythias and the S ' merican Revolution. 

Be vvi Uniform Rank, Knights of Pythias, of 

for a period of thirteen years. On May 12, [9] 1, he was elected 
brigadier-general of the Uniform Rank Knights of Pythias, of Indiana, and 
still holds that commission. He also belongs to the Improved Order of \\v<\ 
Men and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He has Inn- been 
prominent and influential in fraternal circles. 

Mr. Gray was married on June 19, 1912, to Zoe Victoria Jones, daugh- 
ter of a well known and highly respected family of near Veedersburg, 1 
of tin: attractive Brookside farm. .Mr. Gray is a man of pleasing pers n 



366 

with . • a man wl 



1 

1 

1 

his sup 

tl 
S. P. 1 

the escutcheon 

known citizi 

are living. 

S. P. Gra} , of this her's farm and 

k when he \\:is not in school, hi eived a 

iol education in Montgomery county. He started in life 
for himself by following clerical work two years, then engaged in the mer- 
cantile business at YYaynetown, Indiana, for a period of four years with a 
gratifying degree of success. Tie was then in the employ of (he Herzog Dry 
'M.l- Company, giving eminent satisfaction to the linn, with which he re- 
mained until rS<;i. when he came to Covington and entered the 
Bank as assistant cashier, in which capacity he still remains, his long reten- 
tion being criterion enough of his able ai ervice and his 
to the stockholders and patrons of tl I only a man of honor 
able principles, but is a courteous, obliging gentleman anil popular with the 
public. 



L'AIN AND WA1 

The ( itizen 

Bankers, i fin 

■ ■ 

the na Inch it is still ki 

At Mr. Re 

liars. 

S. ! '- G - ' 

Trill, is engaged in farming in Grant county, V. i 

■ 
town, I. living in Mont 

Poli : ; Democrat, 

lly, 1 I of ■] 

the resp* 



The panic of the i : 
i ! : ain ■ gh 

prorrii ... 

its representatives Vmong ol /an Buren 

ho has done much to improve and 
- community, and has aided materially in a'l 
ivhich serve the public interest. 
Freeman Dice was horn in Van Buren township, Fountain county, on 
February 22, 1857, th ;on of Henry and Charlotte ( Rice) Dice. His father 
was born in Rockbridge count)', Virginia, on November 25, [826, tin 
John Dice (for John Dice, see sketch of Franklin Dice). Henry Dice and 
his family came here from Virginia on horseback, the long ride oyer the 
try, all of it new and much of it wilderness, being filled with event and adven- 
ture. He took up land in Van Buren township, of Freeman I 
present farm being land which was taken by his father. Henry Dic< \ 



368 b'OUNTAJ , QIANA. 

1 1 politics lie was a stanch 
: ■ is orgai 

1 
ents, but ni ' 1 ■ ' 

■S in his car": 

: 
; ... lieved to be the 1 in 

From 1 
; ■ 1 

hip, and 
I the pa 

I 

tdred ip, the remain 

• 
graded cattle and I 
form of 
in diro 

1 
burj "riage 

childn 

. the \i oods, at that time 
g. lie ditched the 
farm ; its him elf. Now he has a good house, 

n thoroughly tilled and highly productive, cultivated 
ipproved modern manner. Mr. Dice has lately been interested in 
the organization of the Fanners State Bank of Veedersburg, which began 
business on February 13, 1912. Mr. Dice is the president of this bank, which 
has opened with a very auspicious future: William Madigan is vice-president. 
The business ability and practical acumen of Freeman 1 lice are vv< 
by all who have dealings with him, and be is a thoroughly progressive Ameri- 
can business man and farmer. In politics he is a Republii an. I ic is a mem- 
ber of the United Brethren church. 







>V<tU < 3 



.a ' 



1 fclO.M \.s A. CLI] : 

I t J S L 

I 

; i 
■ 
I 

lean ■ ■ ■ 

slice!-. i itorial ability am 

Clifton nor only one of the kee 
V". e citizen, whose in 

o win for him a 
placi eonfidei 

mntain county when 

i . 

1 

arao 
but mi i 

ion, and during the summer months 1 

arm, v , he imbibed 1 lustry, 

uted to his later success. 
During the winter nontb lie schoo of the neighbor! 

and applied hi h granted a license to 

teach school. By teaching, working on neighboring farms and in barber shops, 
ig Clifton succeeded i i from the public schools at Newtown, 

Indiana, and in taking a course in DePauw University, at Greencastle, In- 
diana. 

Thus equipped, Mr. Clifton took up the career of a school teacher, 
being employed in Fountain and Warren counties, where he met with a 
degree of success, and in 1884-5 he gave efficient service as superintendent of 
the Williamsport high school. He was ambitious to use his energies an 1 
C24) 



37° FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

powers in highei fields of effort and he was selected by the general mission 
board of the ." I Imnli For school work in East India, am] 

id 
thai in \i ar, VI r. i I t'ton had been un 

Pomei port, who 

of lab 

t and tri :n of 1 

Through ! 

Clifton ■:. o establish at Missouri 

which he ] iwing two years, meeting vith much 

in tiie work. However, climatic e not fa r Mrs. Clif- 

ton, whose health became impaired, and in r888 the}' we ' I. very 

reluctantly, to relinquish their work there and retun 

i returning to his old borne. Mr. Clifton engaged again in school 
work, but there now opened up before him a new and wider field i 
one in which 
i 'uxchasing the old i eedersb 
when the plant was moved to Willian 
ren Review, was established, the initi l.i 

nan the busi- 

vhich requin - jlectual readiness, quii k da 

gth of character. These qualities Mr. Clifton evidently possesses, for 
his success in the field of journalism has been remarkable in many res] 
His venture at Williamsport was a success from the start and in eighteen 
months be had built up a subscription list of fifteen hundred and gained for 
the Review the reputation of being the leading paper of the county. 
tin- time he was elected coroner of Warren count)', which office he held two 
terms and the fees of which also contributed to Mr. Clifton's success from a 
financial standpoint, so that in 1895-6 he was enabled to erect in Williams- 
port a business block, costing four thousand dollars, and a splendid residence. 
In June, 1897, Mr. Clifton purchased the Covington Republican, which he 
sold in the following October and purchased the Republican at Fowler, In- 
diana, which he conducted but one year, being successful there also. In 1899 
he again became the owner of the Covington Republican, and, with the ex- 
ception of a few months, has published it continuously to the present time. 
The Republican is a creditable paper from a mechanical standpoint and its 
editorial columns are on a par with any, its utterances being strong and clear 
in behalf of every movement having for its object the betterment of the 
community in any -way, materially, morally, educationally, or socially. Mr. 



FOUNTAIN AND WA1 ] 37 1 

( lii; .11 has the newspaper man's "in lincf foi 

Form, bul .\ ithotii pat 
being graceful, cleai and eleganl in 
Pew resid< nts of the e< I ■ 

1 i the life of the community is Mr. i 

■ worthily discharger! his tin F more worth 

high esteem in which he is held than he. He 

miher of the board i if tru: tees of th 
Indiana i lospital for the Insane; 

tion ai en filled with activity and • 

ness, while his untiring energi and innate abilit] h; gained 
spicuous place in the newspaper fraternitj o te. In 

e of endeavt i . , itor or 

otherwise, his unpretending bearing and stfii lave elevated him in 

the confidence of his fellow citizens and his in lutan 

as it is, is destined to continue a poti i 

after he ceases fr rom the bus) hich he 

has so long been a prominent and effectn 



JOHN C. STEPHENS. 

There are individuals in nearly every community who, by re 
pronounced abilit} and forci i f character, rise above the heads of the n 
and command the unbounded esteem of their fellowmen. Character] 
perseverance and a directing spirit, two virtues that never fail, such men 
always make their presence felt and the vigor of their strong personalities 
serves as a stimulus and incentive to the young and rising generation. To 
this energetic, enterprising, broad-minded and strong-souled class John C. 
Stephens belongs, and because of his genuine worth he enjoys the unqualified 
esteem of all who know him. 

John Stephens was born on April 24, 1859, in Hamilton county, Indiana, 
near the city of Noblesville, and is the son of Henry and Man R. (Wells) 
Stephens. Henry Stephens was horn December 20, 1823, in Greene county, 
Ohio, and Mary R. Wells was a North Carolinian by birth, moving to Hamil- 
ton county, Indiana, where she met her future husband. To their union were 
born four children, three of whom grew to maturity, the subject of this 
sketch being now the only survivor. 



3/-' I'OUNTAIN AND WARREN C01 .ill . INDIANA. 

When John Stephens, was a bab( of on< yeai old the family moved to a 
farm near West Lebanon, Warren county, and there he was reared. Mis 
parents were in limited circumstances and his edu 
very limited. At the age of thirteen year., he began life i n his own a 

farm hand and was I I i atisiicd 

to gel work uf any nature. He worked a1 carpentering, n engaged 

i. and then went into th< tn ! was elected 

■ in which he > I M the 

expiration of his o in [892, he formed a business partnership 

with Hanly & Stansbery, Mr. Stephens taking charge of the abstrai 
work, This : h p continued until Mr. Hani] ongress 

in [894, when the firm name became Stansbery & Stephens. Afterwards 
Stansbery disposed of his interests and the firm name became Stephens & 
Billings. In 1902 Mr. Stephens took over his partner's in1 con 

tinued to conduct the business aione. The teadily 

from the beginning and b I ' ands his full share of the 

abstracting business of the county. His records are ven full and com 
and he is now endea i tve in his office an exact reproduction i 

official records. Mr. Stephens is a stockholder and a director in the Will- 
iamsport State Bank and has some oilier financial holdings, all of which he 
has accumulated by his own efforts. 

On October jo, 1870. Mr, step! 1 Sarah J 

was born October 9, 1851, in Preble county, ( m the 

following children: Elsa, the tvifi Wil • '■ ' oi tb Ledger; 

Bertha., the wife of J. B. Winger, a druggisl in Williamsport; Chester L. is 
associated with his fathei and is unmarried. 

Mrs. Sarah Stephens died on February 16, 1909, and on July 17, 1910, 
Mr. Stephens married Vera E. McCormiek, the daughter of James O. Mc- 
Cormick. Her early life was spent near Waveland and Lebanon, Indiana, 
later coming with her parents to Warren county, which has since been her 
home. Prior to her marriage she was a teacher in the Williamsport high 
school, and was a popular member of the social circles in which she moved. 

Mr. Stephens has always taken a deep interest in religious matters and 
has been an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church since he was 
twenty-eight years old. He is actively interested in Sunday school work and 
for several years has been president of the Warren County Sunday School 
Union. Mrs. Stephens is likewise interested in this work. Fraternally, Mr. 
Stephens is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons, holding membership 
in Williamsport Lodge No. 38, of which he has been secretary for eleven 



1490224 

FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIA \ 373 

years, and to Chapter Mo. 105, Royal Arch Masons. Mr. and Mrs. Sti 
are members of Rocky Dale ( hapter No. 101, Order of the Eastern Star, of 
which Mrs. Stephens is pa Stephens h 

been fi Republican parly, his active interest showing 

itself when he was but six years of age, when b would mount the gate 
at his home and hurrah for Fremont, to the disturbance of h 
Qtiaki r life's activities he has at all : 

endeavo d to perfi 1 hi md that his life record has been 1 

mendable one is at! ed b] the envial le po iti in which he holds in the com- 
munity. Genial in timing in his relations with other . 
honesl i to every wind that blows/ 



OLIVER S. JONES. 

Whether fhe elemei - in life ire innate ittribute: pi the indi- 

or whether they ai 
men: it is in Eul life, 

whatever the 
son of the exisl 

cesses are 
to attempt an analysis in eithei > 

tion in an approxii Bu1 in studyin if Oliver S. 

Jones, a well-1 nown ai ivii gton, there are found many qualities in 

his makeup that always gain definite success in any career if properly directed, 
as his has evidently been done, which has resulted in well-earned success. 

Oliver S. Jones was born in Warren county. Indiana, on October 24. 
1862, and is the son of Robinson C. and Emily (Shelby) Jones. Robinson 
Jon. s was a native of Amelia county, Virginia, and in 1830 came to Fountain 
county, Indiana, settling in Covington with his mother, who was then a widow. 
The paternal grandparents were Richard Cannon Jones and Sarah R. Jones. 
The former died in eastern Indiana in an early day, and his widow was mur- 
dered by an insane man in Covington in 1867. The subject's maternal grand- 
father, Joseph Shell)}', came to Fountain county in 1828 from Circleville, 
Ohio, and settled in Troy township, where he entered land from the govern- 
ment, lie was a surveyor for the government and also followed farming. 
During General Harrison's historic campaign against/the Indians, Mr. Shelbj 



374 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COt N I 1 1 - . INDIANA. 

enlisted and served as quartermaster for three years. Lie was the father of 
six children, namely: Rachel, .Mary. Oliver, Rezin, Indiana and Emily, the 
latter being the mother of the subject. On his waj to Fountain 
Grandfather Shelby stopped at Terre Haute and helped to build manj of the 
first houses there. Robinson < . J d, with his 

two brothers, William and John, established the newspaper known a 
People's F -nJ, new the ; He followed bis trade fi , fii 

teen years, also servii ■ jrear in the war with Mexico, and then en- 

in which pursuit he was engaged until his death, which 

■ ed in 1897, at the age if seventy-five years. His widow survived him 
several years, dying on J id) 21, 1912, 

were the parents of three children, namely: Sarah Belle, who i\<c<\ in 
was the wife of VugUStU 1 1 ■ '-car \\. who [890, raid ( llivei 

S., the subject of this sketch. 

Oliver S. Junes received ■ elementary education in the public schools 
of Warren county, and the tattendi n as the Indiana Normal 

School at Covington. During the folio 

school, during whicl Mention to tht ;tud) ol th 

At the end of thi pel i >d in iti< in 

at Covington. In ' iition as special agent for 

the 'Fi isco railr iad lin< . 

J910 Mr. Jon of his 

profession, in a ill 

and today he is commanding full s legal practice at the local 

courts, lie u w :11 grounded in legal principles, and is an indefatigable stu- 
dent, keeping in touch with the latest decisions in the courts. Of attractive 
personality and recognized worth, Mr. Jones easily wins friends and stands 
high throughout the community. In 1003 Mr. Jones was elected mayor of 
Covington, serving front 1904 to 1906, to the entire satisfaction of his fellow 
citizens. In 1912 he was appointed by Judge Schoonover as a member of the 
board of children's guardians. 

On June 19, 1883, Mr. Jones was united in marriage with Carrie Mada- 
rea, the daughter of James and Harriett (Hall) Madarea, natives of Warren 
county, this state, the father having successfully followed fanning until his 
death. To Mr, and Mrs. Jones have been horn four children, namely: Maude, 
the wife of Clayton Blythe, of Vermilion county; Myrle is the wife of Asa 
Kauffman. of Terre Haute, Indiana; Carlos L., who married Belle I'ruilt 
and lives at Terre Haute; Gilbert, at home. 

Mr. Jones has been successful in business affairs, .aside from his profes- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN I , INI 375 

sion ami is the owner of the old homestead farm in Warn 

ing of one hundred and fourteen acres, which has ' n ■ mtinn '■ in the 

possession of the family since it was • From ll under 

President Jackson's administrate u 

[mpi - -. ed I )rder of Red Men, holding 

Covingl >n. H s religious membership is in the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Ji his endorsement to all mural, educal 1! or material 

inte; ests u hich he beli ; benefit the community, and as a man 

worth he justl] high regard in which he is held. 



ALBERT B. LOWE 



■ name head - this paragraph is : ki 

1 has lived here all 
his life and for a numbei identified with the 

commi r icularly iden- 

tified svitl ell-directed efforts in 

the practii 1 if 

v\ ith which he 1 ut 

him prosperity and his ii Ee dem accomplished b) any 

man ol ■ ;e\ er- 

an :e b • ci ml inui I ,vhich ma; 

to ' lal ii ms of li ft h< i I and 

ivhom he has been broughl in contact and he is 
eminently entitled to representation among the leading men of his community. 
Albert B. Lowe was born in Jackson township, Fountain county, Indi- 
ana, on July 12, 1872, and is the son of Isaiah and Amanda C. (Livengood) 
Lowe. The father also is a native of Jackson township, where he still re- 
sides, being the owner of two hundred and seventy-eight acres of splendid 
land, all in this township, and he is numbered among the enterprising and 
successful farmers and sturdy and progressive citizen- of hi^ locality. The 
subject of this sketch received his elementary education in the public schools 
of Jackson township, attending school later al Covington and completing 
his pedagogical studies in the no'rmal school at Danville, Indiana, lie then 
engaged in teaching school, in which vocation he was eminently successful, 
s.i that he was so engaged fur eight successive terms, all m [ackson town- 



3/0- FOUNTAIN AND WAKBEN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

ship i cepting two terms in Richland township, l r ountain county. In 1901 
Mr. Lowe, in partnership with Jacob E. Fine, went into the furniture and 
undertakhi meeting with very gratifying success and 

continuing the business until [907. In thai year Air. Lowe was a le 
spirit in tl E the Farmers Bank al 

elected pr ■ to the present tin 

itution. The bank ha 
ous cai ig and influent ial 

1 i unty. The i' ■ al responsil 
holders is four hundred thous 

■ , . ■ ■ ■' ' ' 1 

1 >se qualities which 
are especially called for ii itipi bis record in ill 

with which he has been connected ha; high creditable to 

we is ■ ■ ■ hi iw ner of :sidence a ele\ en 

all within td to 

at he has i- da) has be 
industry. 
vl r. Lowe \\ as united in Cora O. Tli 

. : |ack>- m 

■ 
. . and con- 

ivel road-. He is the owner of two hundred md three acres 

• and one hun \n acres of land in 

listrict of Missouri. To him and his wife were hum three 
ly: George Earl, at home: Cora, wife of the subject of this 
sketch; and Joseph E., Jr., also at home. Mrs. Lowe was a teacher prior to 
her marriage. To Mr. and Mrs. Lowe have been born four children, namely: 
Lena, Morris, George and Leslie, all of whom arc at home. 

In political affairs, Mr. Lowe gives his support to the Democratic party, 
in the success of which be is interested, as every wide-awake, intelligent 
voter should he. but be has never been an aspirant for public office of any nature. 
Fraternally, he holds membership in the Free and Accepted Masons, Lodge 
No. 495, at Wallace, the Royal Arch Masons at Covington, and the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. He keeps well abreast of the times, being a 
wide reader and close observer of men and events. He has won the respect and 
esteem of all who know him for his friendly manner, business ability and 
upright living, and has a host of warm personal friends. 



him, M 
said thai 


aii d pers 


township 


ship, bor 


structor 


Of land 


the Sike 







s 

I 



^ 



>3 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, IND 377 

DANIEL FLOREY. 

Individual enterprise, which is so justly the boasl of the V 
people, was strikingly exhibited in the career of the late Daniel Florey, for 

many decades one of Fountain county's leading tanners. \\ hile transmitting 
terity the record of such a life, it is with the hope of instilling into the 
minds of those who come after the important lesson thai honor and station 
are the rewards of individual exertion. That the career of such a person, lie- 
sides being treasured in the hearts of relatives and Erien 
public record also is peculiarlj pr e sub- 

stantial fame rests upon their attainments and character must exei 
some influence upon the rising generation. The life ol 
a busy, useful and successful one and the record is eminently woi 
sal by the student who would learn the intrinsic essence of individuality 
its influence in moulding public opinion and giving charactei and stabil 
a community. 

Daniel Florey was born in Logan township, i' 1 y, Indiana, 

on November 13, 1834. He was the son of Joseph and Lydia 1 Navt ) Florey. 
The father of the subject came, from Wythe county, Virginia, to Fountain 
county, Indiana, in 1834, and settled on a farm which he bought from a Mr. 
Paxton, who had entered it from the govern! re the elder I 

devoted the rest of his life to farming and stock raising, being well known 
among the pioneers of this locality. His family consisted of eight children, all 
now deceased but one. 

Daniel Florey grew to manhood on the home farm and assisted in the 
work of developing the same. He received his education in the common 
schools of the early days. He helped clear the farm bought by his father 
and on this place he spent his life, living on the one hundred and sixty-eight 
acre homestead, which he kept well improved and well cultivated, preferring 
the original homestead to any other land. He and two of his brothers pur- 
chased the same, paying fifteen per cent, interest for the one thousand dollars 
which they paid on the farm. Later they dissolved partnership and divided 
up the land. At the time of his death Daniel Florey had accumulated five hun- 
dred and sixty-seven acres of land, which included the original homestead. 

Daniel Florey married' in March, 1862, Sarah Caroline Voliva, daughter 
of Thomas Jefferson Voliva and Dorcas (Taylor) Voliva. These parent-, came 
from North Carolina to Fountain county, Indiana, in [832, in a one-horse 
cart, accompanied by two ladies who walked all the way. They settled in 
Richland township, one mile from Newtown, and there the father spent the 



3/8 FOUNTAIN AND WARUEN COUNT] 



rest of his 



lying in 1052, his widow surviving man}- years, passing 
away in 1897. They were the parents of ten children, namely: Susan, Eliza- 
beth, Louisa, Alan Jane, Benjamin, Sabrina, all deceased; Thomas lives in 
Midland, Texas; Sarah Caroline, who married Mr. Florey, of this sketch; 
John lives in Bloomingtoii a lives in 1'lcasant Hill, Mi 

Five children were horn to Daniel Florey and wife, namely: Cora mar- 
ried Orange Palin, and they live in Richland township; Carrie married I 
Martin, and they live in Logan township; the third and fourth children died 
in infancy; Hollis is at home. 

Politically, Daniel Fl< rey was a Democrat, but he was not a public man. 
He was a supporter of the Methodist Episcopal church. His death occurred 
on May 20, 1912, when past seventy-seven years of ape. He was a man who 
was always highlj respected for his clean character and upright life. 



ARISTA T. Ll\ ENGOOD. 

The subject of this sketch early realized the fact thai success never comes 
to the idler or dreamer and he has accordingly devoted himself ardently along 
lines that cannot but insure success. The position which he now enjoys at 
the Fountain county bar h 'j rightly appiied ai 

been won by commendable qualities. In such a man as VIr. I ivengood there 
is especial satisfaction in offering in then life records justification for issuing 
a biographical compendium such as the one at hand — not necessarily that the 
careers of such men as his type have been such as to gain them wide reputa- 
tion or the plaudits of men, but that they have been true to the trusts reposed 
in them, have shown such attributes of character as entitle them to the regard 
of all and have been useful in their respective spheres of action, at the same 
time winning and retaining the confidence and good will of all with whom 
they have come into contact. 

Arista T. Livengood was horn on September 10, 1807, a,u ' ' s 1 ' 1 e son of 
Solomon and Elizabeth (Day) Livengood. Solomon Livengood's parents 
came to Fountain county from North Carolina, where the subject's great- 
great-grandfather first settled on his arrival in Ulis country from Germany. 
There ilie family lived until coming to this county in 1839, settling near Hills- 
horo, where the subject's father amassed a valuable estate. The subject's 
maternal grandparents also came from North Carolina, where they had been 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIAN; 



379 



neighbors of the Livengoods. Mrs. Elizabeth Livengoorl was the daughtci 
of Valentine Day, an early settler and very successful farmer of Fountain 
county. 

Arista T. Livengood i linai education in the comni m 

schools of Jackson township, thi implementing this by attendi lj 

summer normal school at Waynetown and Veedersburg. Thus at the age oi 
sixteen years he was qualified as a school teacher. He then entered tin 
school at Covington ai I al i [or a vvh in teaching. Enl ing the 

Indiana Normal School, he was graduated in 1886, witli the degi 
Bachelor of Science and the honors of his class. Mr. Livengood then entered 



the Farmers and Merchants' 
president of the bank being Hoi 
States. Subsequently Mr. Liv 
Banking Company, of which 1 
directors. In the meantime Mi 
entious study to the law and in 
ately entered upon the active pr 
slow in recognizing his abilities 
practice. He has successfully 
in the Fountain count; 
creditable manner. In 
serving in that capacity Mr. J 



ivington as assistanl cashier, the 
beker, then treasurer of the United 
isted in organizing the Covington 
5 been a member of the board of 
'! had been giving close and conso- 
ls admitted to the bar and immedi- 
at profession. The public was not 
now enjoying a large and lucrative 
ne of the most importanl litigation 
cquil d himsel f in a highly 
>inted county attorney and 
erved tour year ai mayoi 
ministrations it has ever had. two 
>f the first improved sidewalks in 



marked features being the construction 
the city and the reduction of the tax rate. 

Mr. Livengood is a Democrat in politics and has taken an active and in- 
fluential part in local and state party affairs. From 1904 to 1908 he served 
as a member of the Democratic state committee and was a member of the 
executive committee of that body. He has also been a member of the county 
committee and in each of these positions he has rendered to his party services 
of great value. He is deeply interested in educational matters and is president 
of the Covington school board. Fraternally, Mr. Livengood belongs to the 
Knights of Pythias, Woodmen of the World and the Tribe of Ben Hur. His 
religious membership is in the Presbyterian church, to which he gives his 
active support and of which be has been a member of the board of trustees 
for ten years. 

On March 21, 1889, Mi Livengood was married to Caddie L. Ludlow, 
the daughter of Samuel J. and Laura E. Ludlow, pf Veedersburg. They have 
become the parents of two children, Hazel Evaline and Josephine, both at 



3S0 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

home. Sufficient has been said to indicate Mr. Livengood's high character 
and eminent success in his profession. He has broad views of the law. is 
painstaking, accurate, indefatigable in his efforts to protect the interests of 
his clients, and his tact in the trial of cases is second to none. 



E. A. DAVIS. 



Were ii not for the love and enjoyment of music, how much of the 
brightness of this world would lie lost? No1 only is music - ; delight in our 
hours of happiness, but in times of distress and despair ii brings to v.- con- 
solation and sympathy. Then, what nobler vocation is there thai 
music master, who goes about increasing the expression of our thoug 
tune and melody, and awakening a love for the works of the'grea! 
of the art. E. A. Davis has been such a one who has devoted his life i i! 
music, and who, though not long a resident of Fountain coun ' h 
himself by marriage to one of its best families, and nov\ finds plea-ure in 
combining agriculture with the practice of his chosen art. 

E. .V. Da>-is was born in Northop, Wales, on February 22, [847, the son of 
Robert and Jane (Jones) Davis. His parents died in Wales. Nearly his whole 
life has been spent as a musician, and years ago he began to teach vocal and in- 
strumental music. He came to this county from Wall 

eral years lived in the gas belt id' Indiana, until the g 1 was exhausted. While 
there he was engaged chiefly in leaching music. In 1005 Mr. Davis came to 
Fountain county, locating in Davis township. On Jul)- 14, KJ07, he was mar- 
ried to Mary C. Chizum, the daughter by adoption of William and Melinda 
Chizum, her birth having occurred at Lexington, Indiana, on the nth of No- 
vember, 1863. William Chizum was born in 1833 near the old home place in 
Davis township, and spent his life there. He was an energetic farmer and left to 
his daughter, Mary C, one hundred and forty-six acres of land, on which he 
had erected a large and comfortable modern house. He was a stanch and up- 
right citizen, holding decided opinions on public questions and giving earnest 
support to all moral questions. He was successful in life and gave intelligent 
direction to the operation of his farm. Mr. Davis rents this place out and over- 
sees the farming. He is engaged extensively in the breeding and feeding of 
graded hogs, raising all his own brood sows and taking much interest in this 
branch of farming, in which he has been quite successful. 

In politics, Mr. Davis is independent. Formerly a member of the Odd 




E A . DAVIS 



MARY CHI ZZUM DAVif 



HHJNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 3SI 

Fellows, at present he is affiliated with no fraternal order. Mr. and Mrs. 
Davis are members of the Methodist church and .Mis. Davis is an active 
church worker, a woman of excellent judgment and character, in every way 
admirable, being highl} esteemed by a!! who know her. Mr. Davis has tno 
eled to a large extent in several different states in the vourjc of his profession, 
and for twelve years was a resident of Missouri Llis years as a musician 
have afforded him a wealth of rich and varied experience. 



A. L. SPINNING, M. D. 

Among the physicians of Fountain county who have risen to eminence 
in their chosen field of endeavor is Dr. A. L. Spinning, of Covington, whose 
career has been that of a broad-minded, conscientious worker in the sphere 
to which his life and energies have been devoted and whose profound knowl- 
edge of his profession has won for him leading place among the medical 
men of his day and generation in western Indiana. Although he has spent 
most of his career in other sections of the state, he is a native of Fountain 
county, being a scion of one of our earliest and worthiest old families and 
has been well known here from his youth up. He has behind him an ancestry 
of which he may well be proud. 

Doctor Spinning was bom here on Jul'.- 7, 7866, and is the son of Will- 
iam H. and Elizabeth (Musser) Spinning, both parents natives of Ohio, the 
father's birth having occurred on January 7, t&42, and that of the mother on 
July 14, 1840. The paternal grandparents >>f the subject were Dr. William 
F: and Eva (Harbaugh) Spinning, the former horn in 1810 and the latter's 
birth occurred in Pennsylvania in 1812. The subject's great-grandfather, 
William Spinning, was born in New Jersey in 17CS3 and devoted his life to 
farming. The last of the Miami Indians to be killed in that state was one 
who was shot in his front yard. Matthias Spinning, the great-great-grand- 
father of the subject of this sketch, was the son of Ebenezer Spinning and 
Phoebe Williams. He was born in Elizabeth, New Jersey, in 1750, and died 
at Lebanon, Ohio, in 1830, at the age of eighty years, having been one of 
the earliest pioneers to the latter state. He served eight years in Washing- 
ton's army during the Revolutionary war and never drew a penny for his 
services, neither did his three brothers, who also served an equal length of 
time in the patriot army during our war for independence. They were 
known as a very patriotic family and regarded it as no hardship to fight for 



3&2 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

freedom without pay. Matthias Spinning was a member of the Presbyterian 
church. He married Hannah Haines on June 10, 1772, at Elizabeth, New 
Jersey. She was born at Elizabeth in 1752 and her death occurred at Leb- 
anon, Ohio, when she was over eighty years of age. She was a faithful 
member of the Presbyterian church. Matthias and Hannah Spinning were 
the parents of the following children: Hannah became the wife of Henry 
Drake and lived at St. Paul, Minnesota; Katie, hum 1781, died [782; Mary, 
born 1774, died 1838, married Benjamin Morris, and lived at Lebanon. Ohio; 
Steven, horn 1777, died 1859, became a Shaker and resided at Lebanon, 
Ohio; David, born 1779. died i860, also joined the Shakers and lived at 
Lebanon; Benjamin Haines married Sarah Holoway and they resided at Leb- 
anon; William, born 1783, died 1819, married Hannah Osborn and they 
lived at Dayton, Ohio; Isaac, born 1786, now deceased, lived at Veeders- 
burg, Indiana; Jerusha, born 17^3. died 1874. never married. 

The great-great-great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch was 
Ebenezer Spinning, the son of Edward Spinning and Anna Lee. He was 
born in 1712 at Elizabeth, New Jersey, and died in that place on April 13, 
1771, aged sixty-one years. In 1749 he married Phoebe Williams, who was 
born, lived and died at Elizabeth. Their children were as follows: Rev. 
Ichabod, who lived in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1814, and was subsequent!)' at 
Morristowm, New Jersey; Matthias, born January jj, 1750, died 1830, was 
married on June 10, 1772, to Hannah Haines, and lived at Elizabeth, New 
Jersey, and Lebanon, Ohio; Judge Isaac, of New York, and Ebenezer. As 
referred to in a preceding paragraph, each of these brothers served eight years 
(1776-1784) 111 the Essex county militia, of the Continental army, during 
the war of the Revolution. Matthias served two years in the Miami cam- 
paign under Gen. "Mad" Anthony Wayne in 1792-3. During this period 
his wife and children lived in the Cincinnati block-house, where his youngest 
child, Jerusha, was born. 

The subject's great-great-great-great-grandfather was Edward Spinning, 
the son of Humphrey and Anna Spinning. He was born in 1666 and died in 
1726 at Elizabeth, New Jersey, at the age of sixty years. LJe was a member 
of the Presbyterian church. Lie married Anna Lee, who died at Elizabeth, 
New Jersey, her will being dated January 2j, 1726. They were the parents 
of one child, Ebenezer, born 1712, died April 13, 1771 , who married Phoebe 
Williams, and is referred to at length in the preceding paragraph. 

Humphrey Spinning, the great-great-great-great-great-grandfather of 
Doctor A. L. Spinning, was born in England in 1630, and died on March 29, 
1689, at the age of fifty-nine years. * He was a member of the Presbyterian 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 383 

church, and was the real founder of this family in America. His uncle, 
Humphrey Spinning, who was born in England in [600, emigrated to New 
Haven. Connecticut, in [639, bringing with him his nephew, Humphrey, who 
was at that time seven years old. Later they moved to Hartford, Connecticut, 
where the uncle died in 1656, leaving his property to his nephew, Humphrey. 
The latter then moved to Elizabeth, of which he became the founder, having 
received a land grant of two hundred and thirteen acres, signed by Lord 
Cartaret, during the reign of King Charles II. Upon this land he founded 
the town in about 1663. On October 14, 1657, he married Abigal Hubbard, 
who died at Elizabeth, New Jersey, and to them was born a son, Edward, in 
1666. Me is referred to specifically in the preceding paragraph. Subse- 
quently Humphrey Spinning again married, his wife's given name being Anna, 
and to this union were burn four sons .and three daughters. From the time 
of Humphrey Spinning to the present, members of this family,' now numerous 
throughout the United States, have been more or less prominent in their 
several communities, being regarded as among our best and most loyal citizens. 

William II. Spinning, father of the subject, was a druggist by profession, 
and also followed farming. He was a soldier in the Civil war, serving three 
years and three months in the Sixty-third Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He 
spent the major portion of his life at Wallace, Indiana, where his death oc- 
curred on April 15, 1898. I is widow survives, making her home at Wayne- 
town, this state. Mr. Spinning was well known and highly respected in the 
communities where he lived. 

A. L. Spinning grew to manhood in Fountain county and here he received 
his early education in the common schools. Early in life he determined to 
follow the medical profession, and with that end in view he entered the Indiana 
Medical School, now the University of Indiana, where he made a splendid 
record and from which institution he was graduated in the year 1891, after 
which he practiced at Wallace, Indiana, until July 15, 1895. For a period 
of six years he had charge of the state hospital at Michigan City, giving 
eminent satisfaction to all concerned, and discharging his duties in a manner 
that reflected much credit upon his ability. For one year he practiced in 
Michigan City, then went to Prague, Oklahoma, where he remained a year, 
then came to Covington, Indiana, in February, 1904, and since then has been 
actively engaged in the general practice here, building up a large and lucrative 
patronage and taking his place among the leaders of the medical profession 
in this part of the state. He has kept well abreast of the times in medical 
research and is in every way deserving of the eminent success he has achieved. 

Doctor Spinning was married on December 12, 1902, to Clara A. 



384 FOUNTAIN AND WARUF.N COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Krueger, the accomplished daughter of John and Christina Krueger, both 
natives of Germany, from which country they came to America when young, 
their parents having died in the fatherland, and they took up their residence 
at Michigan City, Laporte county, Indiana, where they established a 
home and became highly respected citizens. Two children have been born 
to the Doctor and wife, namely: Gladys Louise and Charles Matthias. 

Politically, Doctor Spinning is a Republican, but, while lie is deeply 
interested in the affair.-, of his county and state, he does not find 'time to take 
an active part in politics and has never held office. He belongs to the Fountain 
County Medical Society and holds membership with the Masonic order at 
Covington, having attained to the chapter degrees. He is one of the leaders 
in the local Presbyterian church and he stands high in all the circles in which 
he moves. 



OMER B. RATCLIFF 



In no profession is there a career more open to talent than is that of the 
law, and in no field of endeavor is there demanded a more careful preparation, 
a more thorough appreciation of the absolute ethics of life or of the under- 
lying principles which form the basis of all human rights and privileges. Pos- 
sessing all the requisite qualities of the able lawyer, Omer B. Ratcliff stands 
today among the eminent practitioners of Fountain county, Indiana. 

The first member of the branch of the Ratcliff family to which the sub- 
ject of this sketch belongs, to come to Indiana was Thomas Ratcliff, a native 
of Ohio. Among his children was John Ratcliff, the subject's grandfather, 
who spent most of his life in Parke county, this state, but died at Kingman, 
Fountain county. Omer B. Ratcliff s parents were William R. and Mary C. 
(Ewbank) Ratcliff, the former born November 30, 1831, in Parke county. 
He was not a man of much school education or book learning, but in the 
school of experience he had learned well and was a respected citizen of his 
community. In 1854 he married Mary Ewbank, who was born in Dearborn 
county, Indiana, on January 19, 1835. Both are still living. William R. 
Ratcliff was a farmer in the early days and owned and operated one of the 
■earliest saw-mills in this section of the state, being energetic and industrious 
in all his affairs. To him and his wife were born eleven children, four of 
whom are living. 

Omer B. Ratcliff first saw the light of day on April 24, 1869, at the 
paternal homestead in this county, where his parents still reside. After com- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 385 

pleting the course in the common .schools, he entered Union Christian Col- 
lege, at Merom, Indiana, where he was graduated in [892 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. From there he went to Oskaloosa College, Oskaloosa, Iowa, 
where for two years he taught higher mathematics. Having decided upon 
the practice of law. he entered the law department of Indiana University, 
where he graduated in 18c/), receiving at such time the degree id" Bachelor of 
Laws and in addition thereto a Master's degree in mathematics from the In- 
diana State University. 

Mr. Ratcliff then returned to the home farm, to the operation of which 
he devoted his energies until 1902, when he came to Covington and opened an 
office for the practice of the legal profession, to which he has since devoted 
his entire attention. His abilities were quickly recognized and he has com- 
manded a good clientage during the subsequent years. As a lawyer Mr. Rat- 
cliff evinces a familiarity with legal principles and a ready perception of facts, 
together with the ability to apply the one to the other, which has won him tin- 
reputation of a sound and safe practitioner. His zeal for a client never leads 
him to urge an argument which in his judgment is not in harmony with the 
law, and in all the important litigation with which he has been connected no 
one has ever charged him with anything calculated to bring discredit upon 
himself or cast a reflection upon his profession. From April 21, 1902, to 
January 1, 1907, Mr. Ratcliff rendered efficient and appreciated service as 
prosecuting attorney of the old twenty-first judicial circuit, composed of 
Fountain, Warren and Benton counties. In this connection it may be noted 
that Mr. Ratcliff took a conspicuous part in the case of Fred Chase vs. Moses 
Fowler Chase, generally known as the famous Chase case, in which nearly a 
million dollars was involved. By virtue of his office it became his duty to 
defend Moses Fowler Chase in an attempt to have a guardian appointed for 
him. 

Eminent lawyers from France and the United States became involved 
in the controversy and as such officer it became Mr. Ratcliff' s duty to take 
care of the defendant's interests in the struggle. After a careful investigation 
of all the facts in the case, he became convinced that the appointment should 
be made, and after the trial of the case and the finding of the jury of the in- 
competency of the defendant, he refused to join in a motion for a new trial 
or to appeal said cause to the supreme court. His course in the matter won 
the compliments of the lower court and reflected to the credit of Mr. Ratcliff 
for his courage to stand for what he knew to be right without any thought of 
pecuniary profit or other consideration. 
(25) 



386 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

In 1912 Mr. Ratcliff received the nomination from both the Republican 
and Progressive tickets for the office of circuit judge. 

On the. 4th day of December, 1900, Mr. Ratcliff was united in marriage 
with Minnie Jones, a native of Iowa and the daughter of Jsaac and Sarah 
(Mather) Jones, the latter being a direct descendant of Cotton Mather. Mrs. 
Ratcliff received a good common-school education and possesses qualities 
which have won for her many warm personal friends. Mr. and Mrs. Ratcliff 
have one child, Ernest, who was born October 9, 1902. 

Politically, Mr. Ratcliff gives a stanch allegiance to the Republican party, 
while his religious affiliation is with the Presbyterian church. He has been suc- 
cessful in his profession and has accumulated some valuable town property. 
He is the owner of the best equipped law library in the state of Indiana, out- 
side of that of the supreme court. A man of fine character and social disposi- 
tion, he has won a host of friends, who esteem him for his personal worth. 



OLIVER P. LEWIS. 



There is no member of the Fountain county bar who occupies a higher 
position in the estimation of the people than does Oliver P. Lewis, the well- 
known attorney at Covington. During his many years of practice he has built 
up a very large clientele and he is regarded as an exceedingly safe counsellor 
in all matters pertaining to legal questions. It speaks well for any man who 
may have the confidence of the people to such an extent that he is regarded 
as especially adapted to the settlement of estates and matters of equity. Mr. 
Lewis's services are likewise in large demand where the drawing of intricate 
papers is involved, in fact, as a lawyer he is easily the peer of any of his pro- 
fessional brethren at the local bar, and the honorable distinction already 
achieved is an earnest of the still wider sphere of usefulness that he is 
destined to fill, and the higher honors to be achieved in years to come, as he 
is yet in the prime of manhood and a close observer of the trend of the times 
and an intelligent student of the great questions and issues upon which the 
best thought of the greatest minds of the world is centered. 

Oliver P. Lewis is a native son of Fountain county, born on August 14, 
1861, and is the son of Murphy and Maria (Myers) Lewis. Murphy Lewis 
was a native of North Carolina and came to Fountain county in 1850. He 
here began teaching school and was so engaged for twenty-five years. Ik- 
settled in Mill Creek township, where he engaged in farming during the 
interims between his school terms. In June, 1802, he enlisted in the Sixty- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 38/ 

third Indiana Volunteer Infantry and served three years, being mustered out 
in June, 1865, at Atlanta. Georgia, and discharged at Indianapolis, lie took 
part in the Atlanta campaign, being in the battle of Franklin, after which he- 
was transferred to the Twenty-third Army Corps. Embarking on the largest 
ship in the world at that time, the "Great Eastern." Mr. Lewis was taken to 
Fort Fisher, where they made several successive charges. lie was later a 
witness of the surrender of Johnston's army. One great-grandfather of Mr. 
Lewis, John Van Gundy, served in the war of the Revolution, while another 
great-grandfather, Abraham Myers, was a soldier in the war of 1812. 
Murphy Lewis was the father of nine children, namely: William 11., of 
Memphis, Tennessee; John \\\, of Wabash township, this county; James W., 
of Covington; Oliver P., the immediate subject of this sketch; Josiah J., who 
died on October 31, 1899, at the age of thirty-one years; Clarence E., of 
Sheldon, Indiana: Ira II., of Hoopeston, Illinois; Albert M., of Wabash 
township; Frank, of Covington. 

Oliver P. Lewis secured his preliminary education in the common schools 
and graduated from the Covington high school in 1882. He then entered 
the office of the Hon. Samuel Fletcher Wood, one of the ablest and most 
distinguished lawyers in the state of Indiana, and studied law under his 
tuition and was admitted to the practice of law in 1886. In the spring of 
1887 he opened an office in Covington and has since practiced his profession 
here. 

Mr. Lewis has for years enjoyed his full share of the legal business in 
the Fountain county courts. His habits of close study, industry and critical 
research, his ability to grasp and readily comprehend the law, make him 
necessarily and logically a successful lawyer. The educational, moral and 
material interests of the community are matters of concern to him, and the 
promotion of them is not forgotten in his cherished objects of life. Mr. 
Lewis was elected a member of the Legislature, serving in the session of 
1903 and rendering faithful and appreciated service in the interests of his con- 
stituents. Politically, he is a Republican. Fraternally, he is a Mason. 

On October 19, 1892, Mr. Lewis was united in marriage to Mary H. 
Nelson, the daughter of Joseph H. and Martha S. (Crane) Nelson. Joseph 
H. Nelson was a native of New York state and came to Fountain county, 
Indiana, many years ago. He was a civil engineer of acknowledged ability 
and assisted in the survey of the old Wabash and Erie canal, during which 
time his headquarters were at Terre Haute. He finally settled at Covington, 
where he spent the remainder of his life and died. Mrs. Mary Lewis died 
on March 3, 1903, at the age of forty-one years, without issue. 



388 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

NOAH R. MYERS. 

It is an unquestionable fact that the biographies of enterprising men, 
especially of good men, are instructive as guides and incentives to others. The 
examples they furnish of patient purpose and steadfast endeavor and integrity 
cannot help but influence others. Noah R. .Myers, one of Jackson township's 
most enterprising farmers and public-spirited citizens, is a man who has suc- 
ceeded at his chosen life work through his individual efforts and persistency. 
Like the oak which needs .the tempests to battle with in order to grow hardy 
and resisting, so his nature seems to have been made stronger and better 
through the hard knocks and obstacles that are the common fate of all man- 
kind at some time or other. 

Noah R. Myers is a native of the township in which he now lives and 
was born on September 9, 1850. He is the son of Michael F. and Sarah 
(Sowers) Myers, the former of whom was a native of North Carolina, com- 
ing to Fountain county, Indiana, in an early day. Noah Myers was reared to 
agricultural pursuits and has made that his life work, finding in it and kindred 
lines abundant scope for his energies. He worked on the paternal farmstead 
until twenty-five years of age, being the eldest child in the family. Since 
starting out in life on his own account, Mr. Myers has devoted himself assidu- 
ously to his work, allowing nothing to detract his attention therefrom, and 
therefore his efforts have not been divided. He has succeeded to an unusual 
degree and is numbered today among the largest landowners and most suc- 
cessful farmers and stock raisers of Fountain county. Mr. Myers owns four- 
teen hundred acres of land in this and Montgomery counties, eleven hundred 
and eighty of which are located in Jackson township, and he also has a half 
interest in six hundred and forty-five acres in Matagorda county, Texas, 
which includes some good oil land, including six pumping wells. Mr. Myers 
does not now give much attention to the tilling of the soil, leasing his cultivable 
land, and gives his personal attention to his grazing land, on which he is 
feeding some fine live stock, principally shorthorn cattle and a cross between 
Poland China and Berkshire hogs, in the handling of which he has met with 
splendid success. About two hundred acres of his land is covered with ex- 
cellent timber. Mr. Myers has made permanent and substantial improve- 
ments on his land, including the erection of a fine barn in 1894 and the build- 
ing of his fine residence in 1904. The land is well ditched and tiled and 
everything has been done possible to bring the place to the highest possible 
degree of efficiency and productiveness. 

In 1875 Mr. Myers was united in marriage to Mary J. Clore, the daugh- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 3S9 

ter of Elijah and Mary Jane (Deer) Gore. Mr. Clore was born in Kentucky 
in 1828 and came to Indiana with his parents, settling in Montgomery county, 
where he followed farming. Subsequently he moved to Fountain county and 
lived here until 1894, when he went to Crawfordsville and became one of the 
leading stock raisers of that county. At one time he owned a thousand acres 
of land in Jackson township, Fountain county, which he divided among his 
children when he retired from active fanning. His present home is what was 
formerly known as the Orphans' Home, near Crawfordsville. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Myers have been born the following children: Dcward, who married 
Effie Lowe, is living on one of the subject's farms; one that died in infancy; 
Elsie, deceased; Effie, who is at home, is a graduate of the Crawfordsville 
high school; Ruby, also at home, is now a student in the Crawfordsville high 
school. 

Politically, Mr. Myers is a stanch adherent of the Democratic party, 
though not himself a seeker after office. His religious membership is with the 
Lutheran church of Jackson township. Personally, Mr. Myers is greatly es- 
teemed by his neighbors and fellow citizens and wherever known his name 
stands for upright conduct, honorable dealing and a high standard of man- 
hood and citizenship. 



PHILIP GEMM ER. 

The Germans have brought a great many sterling qualities to this country, 
among which are thrift, energy and the love .of freedom. Many of them left 
their native land because they had heard that in America all were to be free, 
and when they found that the problem of freedom was not completely worked 
out here, they willingly gave their life's blood that this Union might stand 
as our forefathers erected it, the land of the free. After the war, their 
steadfast purpose and determination did much to sustain the country through 
a crisis, and they helped to build the nation on a firmer foundation. 

Among those wdio have done the most in the advancement of Warren 
county, Indiana, is Philip Gemmer, one of the sons of Germany who has taken 
an active part in the affairs of the community, and is one of the oldest and 
most substantial citizens. Major Philip Gemmer was born November 8, 
1832, in Nassau, Germany, which is now attached to Prussia. He was the 
son of August and Christiana (Back) Gemmer. August Gemmer was born 
and educated in Germany. He married Christiana Back, and they had a 
family of four hoys, Peter and Frederick, who are both dead, and Henry 



390 FOUNTAIN AND WAKKKX COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

and Philip. Philip's mother died in Germany when he was a hoy, and shortly 
afterward the family started for America. On the trip over, Mr. Gcmmcr 
married Miss Kinsler. By this union there were four children, John, Justus, 
Catherine and Emma, all of whom are living. The family lived on a farm 
near Canal Dover, Ohio, for fifteen years, and then came to Indiana, and 
settled on a farm in Wabash county, where August Gemmer lived until his 
death, and the family are still living in that location. 

Philip Gemmer, however, left them on the Ohio farm, when he was nine- 
teen years of age. lie had received his education in Germany, and was ready 
to start out and make his own way in the world. He first went to LaGro, 
Wabash county, Indiana, and commenced learning the trade of a cabinet- 
maker. After two years he went to Lafayette where he finished his appren- 
ticeship in his trade, and decided to go into business for himself at West 
Lebanon, Indiana. He was very successful there, and had a prosperous busi- 
ness when the call for volunteers came in 1861. Then he cheerfully left all 
in the cause of his adopted country. He was discharged after three months' 
service in the Tenth Indiana, but re-enlisted in 1862 in the Eighty-Sixth Indi- 
ana Infantry, and served over three years. Mr. Gemmer was mustered in 
as captain, and became major in the Eighty-Sixth Regiment, Arm}- of the 
Cumberland. Where danger called, these men might be found, and they saw- 
real service in battles at Perryville, Kentucky, Stone River, Chickamauga 
and Mission Ridge, Tennessee, and Atlanta and Peachtree Creek. Georgia, 
besides Kenesaw Mountain, Allatoona and Buzzard Roost. After the war he 
was honorably discharged and came to Marshfield, Indiana, where he went 
into the grocery business for about two years. 

Major Gemmer moved to Wjlliamsport, Indiana, in 1867, where he con- 
tinued in the grocery business for about seven years. For about three years 
he lived a retired life, and then turned his attention to farming and stayed on 
the farm for about seven years. He had one hundred and eighty-five acres 
of land near Attica, Indiana, and he thoroughly enjoyed his productive fields. 
About this time he was made township trustee and held that position for four 
years. He was then elected county treasurer on the Republican ticket. 
While he was taking such an active part in public affairs, Major Gemmer 
rented his farm, and came to Williamsport to live. But immediately upon the 
cession of his arduous public duties he returned to his farm, and he spent 
altogether about ten years on his place before he sold it to his son Wilmer. 

Though Major Gemmer might well have retired, and felt himself thor- 
oughly justified in enjoying a well earned rest at that time, he was not one 
to love a life of ease, and became actively interested in the lumber business 



FOUNTAIN AND WAKREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 39 1 

He was very successful in this line and operated his business personally for 
sixteen years. He was induced to retire about four years ago, and has been 
enjoying himself with his large family of children and grandchildren since 
that time. Major Gemmer was married three times. By his first wife, 
Margaret Moore, whom he married in 1865, he had one boy, Frederick, who 
married Jesse Bittihger. Through this marriage Major Gemmer has two fine 
grandchildren, Earl and Lorenzo. In 1871 he married Lydia E. Smith, and 
they had two children. His son Wilmer married Lota Biggs, and they and 
their four children, Catherine, Phillip, Carolin and Ralph, live on the farm 
upon which Major Gemmer lived for a number of years. Their daughter, 
Lydia E. Gemmer, married J. G. Collicatt, and they have three girls, Mary, 
Ruth and Martha. In 1873 Major Gemmer lost this wife, and later he was 
married to Minerva Fleming, and they had one child, George, who married 
Nettie Brown. George Gemmer is in the automobile business in Detroit. 
They have one child, George, Jr. . 

Major Gemmer and his third wife now live at their residence in Will- 
iamsport, Indiana, enoying the many activities in which they are engaged. 
Airs. Gemmer is a member of the Eastern Star, and is one of the most active 
spirits in the Presbyterian church. Major Gemmer is a Mason and a mem- 
ber of Bryan Post, Grand Army of the Republic, of which order he has served, 
as commander. 

Though Major Gemmer travels about the country a great deal, visiting 
his children and grandchildren, and taking an interest in their affairs', he is 
still actively interested in local conditions, and is one of the most prominent 
men in the community. He is a self-made man, and henoe in a position to 
understand business conditions and to counsel wisely when he is sought for 
advice by his neighbors and friends, by whom he is highly respected. But his 
place in the hearts of his grandchildren is unsurpassed, for he can entertain 
them by the hour with real war stories and tales of his youth across the sea. 
One whose harvest of life is so abundant may unhesitatingly let his life stand 
as a lesson for future generations. 



ROBERT KROUT. 



Among the well known citizens of Jackson township who have taken 
their full part in all the affairs of the community, and have always lent their 
assistance to all efforts for the common good, is Robert Krout, recently trus- 
tee of Jackson township, and formerly its assessor, in which capacities he has 
served so faithfully and well that he has satisfied not only the party which 



392 FOUNTAIN AND WAKREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

elected him, but all the citizens of the township, of whatever political affiliation. 
Robert Krout was born in Jackson township on December 5, 1865, the 
son of Henry and Melinda (Fine) Krout. His father was born in the same 
township in 1836 and his mother was born in this county in 1833. They were 
the parents of nine children, Caroline, Evaline, Robert, Jacob, Luella, Etta. 
Annie, M. I. and one who died in infancy. Henry Krout received bis educa- 
tion in the old log cabin schools of Jackson township, began farming at an 
early age, and spent his life in farming in Jackson township. He died in 
1895, leaving a memory respected by all, for he was an honest and hardwork- 
ing citizen of many sterling attributes of character. His wife, the sr' ject's 
mother, lives now on the old home place. 

Robert Krout attended the common schools, and then began fanning. 
At present he owns seventy acres of land in Jackson township, twenty of 
which he does not plow, but keeps in pasture and woods. His is an excellent 
and productive farm, though not of large acreage. In 1884 Mr. Krout was 
married to Alice Harrison, the daughter of John and Sarah (Hamm) Hani- 
son. Her father is a cousin of President Benjamin Harrison. Mr. and .Mrs. 
Krout are the parents of five children, namely: Homer, who married Edith 
Allen and lives on the home farm ; Ora, who married May Titus, lives on one 
of the Myers farms in this township, and has two children, Marjorie and 
Ruth, who are the delight of their grandparents: Earl, who died in kjio, at 
the age of nineteen; Jessie and Virgic, at home. Mr. Krout's farm is situated 
in the extreme southeastern corner of Fountain county, and adjoins Mont- 
gomery and Parke counties. He carries on general mixed farming, following 
a rotation of crops, and has obtained from his farm a comfortable Jiving. 

Mr. Krout is a member of the Lutheran church. Fraternally, he is a 
member of Masonic Lodge No. 495 at Wallace. In politics he is a Democrat 
and active in the affairs of the township and county. From 1900 to 1904 he 
•was assessor of Jackson township and from 1904 to 1908 trustee. He is a 
man whose ready congeniality has gained and kept for him many friends, and 
no citizen of the township is better known than is he. 



LEWIS E. FRENCH. 



No better farmer could be found in Davis and surrounding townships, 
Fountain count}', than Lewis E. French. He is one of those men who, early 
in life, realized the fact that success never smiles upon the idler or dreamer 
and he has accordingly followed such an aphorism all the years of his active 
manhood, devoting his life to ardent toil along lines that cannot but insure 




(f^ ^c^o-uj £ n '/i^yts txk 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 393 

success. The prosperity which he enjoys has been the result of energy rightly 
applied and has been won by commendable qualities. He has been a busy and 
careful worker in his chosen life and has never allowed the "grass to grow 
under his feet." 

Air. French was born in Warren county, Indiana, July 20. 1851, and is 
the son of Samuel and Alary E. (Bowlus) French. The father was born in 
Parke county, Indiana, in 1828, of which county David French, the paternal 
grandfather of the subject, was a very early settler, having come from Ohio. 
The mother of the subject came to this section of Indiana when she was 
twelve years old. with her parents, who located in "Warren county, two and 
one-half miles southwest of Williamsport. Three children were born to 
Samuel French and wife: Cleantha, who married Rum Robb, and they live in 
Warren county; Henry died in 1900; and Lewis E., of this sketch, who was 
second in order of birth. The father of the above named children settled in 
Warren county, where he spent the rest of his life engaged in agricultural 
pursuits. He was a Democrat, but he never held office. 

Lewis E. French grew up on the home farm and was educated in the 
common schools. In 1884, he was united in marriage with Bridget Reradon, 
daughter of John and Hannah Reradon, natives of Ireland, where they spent 
their earlier years, coming to America and locating in Warren county, In- 
diana, when that county was comparathely new and contained few settlers. 
They were thrifty and courageous, and possessed other characteristic traits 
of the Irish, so the)' soon found themselves in possession of a good home and 
farm. Mr. Reradon worked on the construction of the Wabash railroad when 
it was built into Warren county. Mrs. French was born in that county and 
there she grew to womanhood and received her education. 

Two children, Nina, who died at three years of age, and Clara, who lives 
at home, have been born to the subject and wife. 

Politically, Mr. French is a Democrat, has been more or less active in 
local party affairs, and is now successfully and satisfactorily discharging the 
duties of county supervisor; he is also a member of the advisory board of 
Davis township. 

Mr. French is the owner of one of the most desirable farms in this part of 
the county, owning the old Odell farm, which consists of two hundred and 
twenty acres of as valuable and well improved land as Davis township can 
boast of. Here he carries on general farming and stock raising on an extensive 
scale and has accumulated a comfortable competency through his good man- 
agement and close application. He has one of the finest homes in the county. 
It is a commodious, beautifully decorated and convenient residence, in the 
midst of a fine grove and well kept lawn. 



394 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

SYLVESTER H. ELWELL. 

Specific mention is made of many of the worthy citizens of Fountain 
county within the pages of this work, citizens who have figured in the growth 
and development of this favored locality and whose interests are identified 
with its every phase of progress, each contributing in his sphere of action to 
the well-being of the community in which he resides and to the advancement 
of its normal and legitimate growth. Among this number is he whose name 
appears above, peculiar interest attaching to his career from the fact that all 
of his busy and useful career has been spent within the borders of this county, 
which has been the arena of his activities for sixty-three years, or during one 
of the most active periods of the great development of this locality, in which 
he has played no inconspicuous part. 

Sylvester H. Ehvell was born in Mill Creek township, Fountain county, 
Indiana, on October 12, 1849, an d is a son of Amaru h and Caroline (Sines) 
El well. The lather was also a native of the Hoosier state, having been horn 
on January 16, 1822, while the mother, who was a native of Ross county, 
Ohio, was born on January 6, 1828. Amariah Ehvell came to Fountain 
county in 1831. The subject's grandfather, John Ehvell, took up govern- 
ment land here and carried on farming operations until his death, which oc- 
curred in 1856. His son, Amariah, followed the same pursuit, in which he 
met with considerable success, and was numbered among the leading citizens 
of his section of the county. He died in 1894, his wife having passed away 
in 1874. They were the parents of nine children, of whom six are living, the 
subject of this sketch and a sister being residents of Mill Creek township. 

Sylvester Ehvell received a good, practical education in the common 
schools of his township and has always devoted his attention to agriculture as 
his principal life work. Being practical in his methods and indefatigable in 
his efforts, he has been permitted to realize a satisfactory return for the energy 
expended and today his home place bears abundant evidence of his industry 
and excellent management. His home farm comprises one hundred and 
thirty-six acres of land, of which one hundred and ten are under cultivation. 
Here he carries on general farming operations, raising also some excellent 
grade live stock. Mr. Ehvell has lived twelve years on his present place, 
having formerly resided on his father's place for fourteen years. However, 
Mill Creek township has always counted him among her citizens excepting the 
period when he was in public official life. 

Politically, Mr. Ehvell is a Republican and has for many years been a 
conspicuous figure at caucuses and conventions of his party. During four 



EOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 395 

years, from 1880 to 1884, he served as trustee of Mill Creek township, and 
from 1886 to 1894, a period of eight years, he served as auditor of Fountain 
county, in which responsible position lie gave the same efficient and high- 
grade service which characterized his performance of the duties of the minor 
office, retiring from office with the good will and commendation of his fellow 
citizens. Fraternally, Mr. Elwell belongs to the Masonic order, holding mem- 
bership in Yeddo Lodge No. 636. lie was at one time affiliated with the In- 
dependent Ordei of Odd Fellows, but is now dimitted from that order. 

In June, 1868, Air. Elwell was married to Martha Walton, the daughter 
of David R. and Ruth (Carter) Walton. These parents were early settlers 
of Parke county, Indiana, they having been natives of Ross county, Ohio. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Elwell have been born four children, namely: Elmer Grant, 
who is connected with the postoffice department at Washington, D. C. ; Mary, 
who died at the age of twenty-one years; Eda is at home; Pearl is the wife of 
William A. Banta, a liveryman at Crawfordsville, this state. 

Mr. Elwell is a plain and unassuming man, well endowed with good 
sense, and his genial, manner as well as his sterling qualities of character have 
won for himself a warm place in the hearts of his fellow citizens. 



ANSON G. MADDEN. 

Among the enterprising and progressive citizens of Fountain county none 
stand higher in the esteem of his fellow citizens than the gentleman whose 
name forms the caption of this sketch. He has long been actively engaged in 
agricultural and stock raising pursuits, and the years he has spent in this 
county have but served to strengthen the feeling of admiration on the part of 
his fellow men owing to the honorable life he has led and the worthy example 
he has set the younger generation. Mr. Madden's reputation as a judge of 
live stock has transcended the borders of his native state and he is known as 
one of the leaders in this respect of the middle West, having been honored by 
a leading position as superintendent of live stock at the Louisiana Purchase 
Exposition in St. Louis, 1904. He also enjoys a wide reputation as an auc- 
tioneer, having few peers and no superiors in western Indiana. He has made 
a success of whatever he has turned his attention to, being a man of keen dis- 
cernment, a close student and straightforward in his relations with the world, 
and a man of indomitable energy. He believes in doing well whatever is 
worth doing at all and therein perhaps lies the secret of his success. 



39^ FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Anson G. Madden, proprietor of Glenwood Stock Farm in Fulton town- 
ship, Fountain county, was born in Parke county, Indiana, September 23, 
1859, and is the son of Samuel C. and Lydia A. (Marks) Madden. The 
father was born in Clinton county, Ohio. He came to Parke count)', Indiana, 
as early as 183" and there devoted his life to farming. He was one of the pio- 
neers there, having built a log cabin and cleared his land, literally hewing out 
a home from the vast woods that covered the country at that time. He en- 
dured the hardships and privations bravely and became well established and 
was 'influential in the early affairs of that county. In 1899 he retired from 
active life, moving to Kingman, Fountain county, and died a year later, in 
1900, his widow surviving to an advanced age, passing away in 1909. They 
were the parents of two children, Miles M., who lives on the old home place 
in Parke county, and Anson G., subject of this sketch. 

Anson G. Madden was reared to manhood on the home farm and there 
he assisted with the general work during crop seasons, attending the common 
schools in the winter time. He came to Fountain count)' in 1S96, locating at 
the town of Kingman, where he engaged in buying and shipping grain and 
live stock, and from that time to this he has followed auctioneering all over 
the county, and he has cried sales in ten different states. He is one of the 
best known, most popular and successful auctioneers in this section of In- 
diana, in fact, ranks with the best in the entire country. Pie is also one of 
America's best judges of horses and he makes most of the states of the 
Union in starting races. He has also started many county races. He was 
honored during the St. Louis World's Fair by being appointed superintendent 
of the horse and cattle department, having been chosen by the committee 
over eleven hundred other applicants. This is certainly a criterion of his abil- 
ity and wide popularity as a stock man. He discharged the' duties of this re- 
sponsible position in a manner that reflected much credit upon himself and 
to the eminent satisfaction of all concerned. 

Mr. Madden is the owner of a finely improved and valuable farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres, all tillable, and very admirably located one-half mile 
south of the village of Cates, Fulton township, this county. He rents part of 
his place, which is known as the "Glenwood Stock Farm," as stated above. It 
is well improved and he has an attractive home and large substantial outbuild- 
ings, everything about the place denoting thrift and good management. Here 
is carried on general farming and large herds of graded stock are handled. 
He moved to this farm on March 1, 191 2, having spent the five years previous 
in Covington. 

Mr. Madden is a Democrat and is active in party affairs, being a leader 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 397 

in a county which is nominally five hundred Republican. He was formerly the 
efficient county clerk, having been elected to this office in 1906 and serving 
four years, to the satisfaction of all concerned irrespective of party alignment. 
Fraternally, he is a Royal Arch Mason, holding membership in the Covington 
chapter; he also belongs to the Improved Order of Red Men and the Order of 
Owls. He belongs to Masonic Lodge No. 314, at Kingman, the Knights of 
Pythias, No. 24, at Kingman; also the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, Lodge No. 483. at Crawfordsville. He is prominent in fraternal circles. 

Mr. Madden was married to Marilda Pithoud, and to this union one son 
has been born, Claud P., who has built up an excellent business at Danville, 
Illinois, as auctioneer, and he makes his home there. Mr. Madden was later 
married to Lydia Lindley, and to this union three son were born, Fred L., 
George S. and L. J. The subject's third marriage was to Nellie C. Bowsher, 
daughter of Sylvester and Marilda (Backus) Bowsher. This union has re- 
sulted in the birth of one son, Anson Glenwood. Sylvester Bowsher and wife 
were among the early settlers of this part of the county, and Mr. Bowsher 
became prominent in local affairs. . He was a stockholder in the bank at 
Kingman, and was one of the organizers of that institution. Both he and 
his wife passed away in 1900. 

Mr. Madden is a self-made man and has won his way in life unaided. 
Personally, he is a man of pleasing address, obliging, genial, a good mixer, 
makes and retains friends without effort, and he is in every way worthy of the 
high esteem in which he is universally held. 



JOHN S. BOORD. 



Among the strong and influential citizens of Fountain county whose 
records have become an essential part of the history of this section the hon- 
ored gentleman whose name appears above occupies a prominent place and 
for years has exerted a beneficial influence in various ways. His chief char- 
acteristics are altruism, keenness of perception, a tireless energy, honesty of 
purpose and motive and every-day common sense, which has enabled him not 
only to advance his own itnerests, but also to largely contribute to the moral 
and material advancement of the community. 

John S. Boord, well known teacher, farmer and minister, and one of the 
most representative and popular citizens of Fountain county, of which he is a 
native and where most of his useful and busy life has been spent, was born on 



39^ FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

April 28, 1853, ancl is the son of Jonathan and Miriam (Dudley) Boord. The 
father was a native of Ohio, from which state- he came to Fountain county, 
Indiana, with his father, Elijah Boord, when the former, Jonathan Boord, 
was eight years of age, and here he grew to manhood under pioneer conditions. 
Elijah Boord entered land from the government, for which he paid one dollar 
and twenty-five cents per acre, and he established the permanent home of the 
family in Van Buren township, erected a cabin and began clearing the new 
land, finally developing a good farm. He and his son, Jonathan, were both 
hrick masons by trade, which they followed in connection with agricultural 
pursuits. They built nearly all the brick houses in this locality, which substan- 
tial structures will long remain as monuments to their skill. Here they both 
spent the rest of their lives, the death of Elijah Boord occurring in 1855 and 
that of Jonathan Boord in 1888. They were known as energetic, hospitable and 
public-spirited citizens, men of exemplary character. 

Eight children were born to Jonathan Boord and wife, named as follows: 
Johanna married Russell Warrick; Elijah M. is living in Covington; Ira Allen 
lives at Stone Bluff, this county; John S., of this review; Nancy, now de- 
ceased, married Charles Sawyer, of Troy township; Elizabeth married Will- 
iam Crumley, of Van Buren township; George makes his home in Van Buren 
township; Joseph J., of this township. 

The father of the above named children was a Republican in politics, and 
he was more or less active in public affairs; he was justice of the peace for 
many years during the early days and was also postmaster at Merom, Sulli- 
van county, for some time. He was also active in church work, being a deacon 
in the Osborn Prairie church for many years, being one of the main pillars of 
the local congregation. He was a man who delighted in doing good w herever 
it was needed. 

John S. Boord was educated in the common schools of his native county, 
later completing the course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, at 
Union Christian College, at Merom, Indiana, having made an excellent record 
in that institution. He began life for himself by teaching school, which he 
followed with very gratifying success for a period of twenty years or from 
1876 to 1896. His services were in great demand and he was popular with 
both pupils and patrons, for he was both an educator and an entertainer and 
kept well abreast of the times. Believing that a larger field of usefulness 
existed for him in the ministry, he abandoned teaching in 1S96 and began 
preaching, and he is still active. He organized the church at Fountain in 
1902. He has always been an active church worker, and he has done much 
good in this locality along religious lines. As a speaker he is logical, earnest, 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUN iTES, INDIANA. 399 

an able expounder of the scriptures and not infrequently truly eloquent. He 
and wife have always lived on their farm of one hundred and twenty-five 
acres, which is well improved, and on this he and his boys carry on general 
farming. 

Mr. Boord was married in 1SS3 to Rose Anna Campbell, daughter of 
Samuel and Sarah (Spinning) Campliell. The father was born in Ohio, from 
which state he came to Richmond, Indiana, in the early days, later coining to 
Fountain county, where he became well established and well known. Here 
Mrs. Boord was reared to womanhood and received her educational training- 
Four children have been born to the subject and wife, namely: Cecil E., 
born June 29, 18S4, received an excellent education, and he is now professor 
of chemistry in the Ohio State University and makes his home in Columbus. 
He was educated in the common schools and the high school at Vecdersburg, 
later taking a course at Wabash College, at Crawfordsville, Indiana, from 
which institution he was graduated in 1907; he subsequently did five years' 
work at Columbus, and was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Philos- 
ophy. He was also given the degree of Master of Arts at Columbus. He is 
a young' man of brilliant intellect and for whom the future augurs much of 
sticcess and honor. Samuel J., the second child born to the subject and wife, 
first saw the light of day on April 28, 1888; he married Julia Crane, and is 
farming in Van Buren township, this county; Wendell P., born June 28, 1890, 
and Teddy, born January 3, 1897, both live at home. 

Mr. Boord formerly voted the Republican ticket, but he is how an advo- 
cate of the principles of prohibition. He has never been very active in politics 
and has held no office. 



CHARLES C. LUCAS. 

Improvement and progress may well be said to form the keynote of the 
character of Charles C. Lucas, farmer of Mill Creek township, Fountain 
county, and although he hails from the Blue Grass state, which he still de- 
lights in, he has not only been interested in the work of advancement of in- 
dividual affairs, but his influence is felt in upbuilding the community of the 
Hoosier state, where he has elected to make his permanent home. Mr. Lucas 
has been a very industrious man all his life, striving to keep abreast of the 
times in every respect, and as a result every mile post of the years he has 
passed has found him further advanced, more prosperous, more sedate and 
with a larger number of friends than the preceding; in short, the record of his 



400 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

business career might be summed up in the terse expression that he is "above 
want and below envy." 

Mr. Lucas was born in Herrodsburg, Kentucky, March 27, 1861. He is 
a son of E. P. and Susan (Jones) Lucas, both natives of Kentucky, where they 
grew to maturity, received their educations and. were married. The father 
learned the carpenter's trade when a boy and made it his chief life work. He 
moved to Georgetown, Illinois, in 1876, where he followed farming the rest 
of his life. His family consisted of the following children: Melvina, who 
married G. W. Moore, of Sidell, Illinois ; Charles C., of this review ; George 
W. is a merchant at Wavelaud, Indiana; James is farming in Oklahoma; 
Clara married G. T. Baum, a farmer of Indianola, Illinois. 

Charles C. Lucas grew to manhood under the parental roof, and he re- 
ceived his education in the common schools, moving to Illinois with his par- 
ents in 1876, and for a period of eleven years he engaged successfully in the 
grocery business at the town of Shelbyville, that state. Then he farmed two 
years, and in 1904 came to Mill Creek township, Fountain county, Indiana, 
and here he has since been engaged in general farming and stock raising. . He 
has become the owner of a fine farm, well improved and very productive, con- 
sisting of one hundred and ninety-two acres, all under cultivation with the 
exception of twelve acres of timber. He has a good home and other desirable 
buildings about the place. 

Mr. Lucas was married on December 23, 1886, to Belle B. Douglas, 
daughter of Dorman B. Douglas, of Catlin, Illinois, where the Douglas family 
has long been well known. To this union three children have been born, name- 
ly: T. G. Lucas is night agent for the Big Four railroad at Crawfordsville, 
Indiana; Claude C. Lucas and W. A. Lucas are at home with their parents. 

Politically, Mr. Lucas is independent, preferring to vote for the man 
instead of the party. Fraternally, he is a member of the Masonic order. 



MARION ABOLT. 



Agriculture has been the true source of man's dominion on earth ever 
since the primal existence of labor and has been the pivotal industry that has 
controlled, for the most part, all the fields of action to which his intelligence 
and energy have been devoted. Among this sturdy element in Fountain 
county, Indiana, whose labors have profited alike themselves and the com- 
munity in which they have lived, is the gentleman whose name heads this 




Ji 






FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 4OI 

sketch, who has for many years been one of the substantial and best known 
farmers of this section of the state. An enumeration of the representative 
men of this vicinity would be incomplete without specific mention of this 
popular, influential and respected citizen. A member of one of the old and 
highly esteemed families of the county, he has stamped the impress of his 
individuality upon the community, standing ever for progress and advance- 
ment along all lines that would benefit the people at large. 

Marion Abolt is a native son of Fountain count)-, having been born in 
Richland township on the 24th of December, 1854. fie is the son of John 
and Mary (Furr) Abolt. John Abolt was born in Ohio in 1816, and in 1825 
he came with his parents to Richland township, Fountain county, being num- 
bered among the earliest settlers of this section of the state. The subject's 
paternal grandfather was Jacob Abolt, who lived to the age of ninety-nine 
years, having been during his active years a successful miller and influential 
citizen. John Abolt was a farmer by vocation, which he followed during all his 
active years. He died in 1905, his wife having preceded him to the grave in 
1898, They were the parents of three children, namely: Samuel, who lives 
in Warren county, this state; Alice, who became the wife of Samuel Rice, and 
Marion, the immediate subject of this sketch. The mother of these children 
was a Baptist in religious belief and Mr. Abolt.'s political faith was in the 
Democratic party, in the success of which he was deeply interested, though he 
was not in any sense a seeker after public office. He was a man of splendid 
personal character, holding an enviable position in the community because of 
his sterling worth. 

Marion Abolt received his education in the common schools of his home 
neighborhood, attending also one winter term in the schools at Newtown. He 
was reared to the life of a farmer and has always devoted himself to that 
vocation, in which he has met with a very gratifying degree of success. He is 
the owner of five hundred and twenty-three acres of splendid land, of which 
four hundred and fifteen acres lie in Richland township and one hundred and 
eight in Troy township, and of his land, four hundred and fifty acres is in 
cultivable condition, the entire estate being numbered among the best farms 
of the county. Mr. Abolt is progressive and up-to-date in his methods, being 
at all times ready to adopt new ways of doing things when the practicability 
and wisdom of the new way has been demonstrated. He has carried on a 
general system of farming, raising all the crops common to this section of the 
country and giving due attention to the rotation of crops so that the fertility 
of the soil will be perpetuated. He sows from one hundred and forty to one 
hundred and fifty acres to clover every year and it is seldom that he has a poor 

(26) 



402 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

crop year. Mr. Abolt also gives considerable attention to the raising of good 
graded stock, principally hogs and cattle, of which he has sold large numbers 
to shippers every year, hut during the present year he will ship his own stork 
direct to market. He has heen very successful in all his operations and he- 
cause of his business qualifications and his persistent efforts along legitimate 
lines he has accumulated a handsome competency. 

On November 17, 1887, Mr. Abolt was united in marriage with Martha 
J. Miller, the daughter of James and Keziah (Solomon) Miller. Her father, 
who was a successful farmer in Troy township, was a native of Fountain 
•county, bom in 1834, and his death occurred on the home farm on September 
11, 1895. He was the father of ten children, of whom six survive. Mr. Mil- 
ler was a Spiritualist in religious belief, while in politics I. supported the 
.Republican and Greenback parties. Mrs. Miller died on October 1, 1887. 

Mr. and Mrs. Abolt became the parents of four children, namely: Naomi 
A., who is the wife of Jasper Bales, who is engaged in farming on the sub- 
ject's place; Amy died at the age of three years; Borden and Oveta are stu- 
dents in the graded schools at Newtown. 

Politically, Mr. Abolt is aligned with the Democratic party, in the sup- 
port of which he is zealous, but is not a seeker after public office. Religiously, 
he is a Baptist, belonging to the church of that faith at Newtown and contrib- 
uting liberally to its support. His influence is ever given to those phases of 
public activity which tend to promote the best interests of all the people and 
he is rightfully numbered among the representative men of his community, 
where his life has been characterized by an integrity of the highest type. 



G. L. CORY. 



The Cory family is one of the oldest and best known in Fountain county, 
Indiana, and G. L. Cory, of Kingman, Indiana, promises well to uphold the 
family reputation of public spirit and progress and to make a mark for him- 
self in this world. He has already made his presence distinctly felt in his 
community. 

His father, J. M. Cory, was born in 1847 m Fountain county, Indiana, 
where he lived his early life, and married Serene E. Misner. In 1879 he pur- 
chased a drug store in Harvcysburg, Indiana. He ran this store for nine 
years, then moved the store to Kingman, Indiana, where he continued until 
January 1, 1912, when he turned it over to his son, G. L. Cory, who had pre- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 4O3 

pared himself for the charge by a term in Purdue University, studying phar- 
macy, as well as through his actual experience. J. M. Cory has five children, 
Katie, C. E., G. L., M. L. ami Wayne Cory, the latter of whom is in the drug 
store with his brother. 

G. L. Cory was born in Mill Creek township, Fountain count}-, Indiana, 
February 23, 1882, and there received his early education. In 1902 he married 
Crete Copeland, daughter of Oliver and Anna (DeBaun) Copeland. Oliver 
Copeland is an extensive buyer of horses, and one of the best judges of horses 
in the county. 

G. L. Cory and his wife did not desert the land of their fathers, but have 
lived at Kingman with their two children, Gerald, who is eight years old, and 
Frances, who is two. 

Although his hair is not white, his business associates and fellow citizens 
seem to have a very good opinion of G. L. Cory"s head, and he has already 
served as city treasurer and clerk at Kingman, and is one of the foremost citi- 
zens. The office of city treasurer is now held by his brother. Mr. Cory's prom- 
inence in his own community has not narrowed his interests, and he is iden- 
tified with orders and lodges in several parts of Indiana. He is an Elk, with his 
membership at Craw-fordsville, Indiana, and is a member of the Masonic 
lodges in Kingman. He is also identified with the Knights of Pythias, the 
Modern Woodmen of America and the Court of Honor. He is young, full of 
enthusiasm and energy, and his wider interests are enabling him to do a great 
deal of good in his community. His name is prominent in all activities that 
lead to the increased good of his native town and county. Mr. Cory is a young 
man who has already "done things." 



WILLIAM FURR. 



No higher compliment can be paid to a man than to say that when he 
started in life he had nothing, and that he owes all his present prosperity en- 
tirely to his own efforts. This can be said of William Furr, one of the well 
known and prosperous residents of Mill Creek township, who by his own 
energy and perseverance accumulated a large amount of farming land, lie- 
came one of the best farmers of his locality, and has always stood well in 
the opinions of his neighbors and acquaintances. 

William Furr was born in Cain township, Fountain county, Indiana, on 
July 31, 1 83 1, the son of Jacob and Mary (Gosling) Furr. His parents came 



4O4 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COINTIKS, INDIANA. 

to this county from Kentucky in 1826, locating in Jackson township, but later 
removing to Cain township, where they spent their lives in farming, and lived 
happily with their numerous family and in the society of their neighbors. 
William Furr, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, came to this 
county with a family of seven, six boys and one girl. He was a farmer ami a 
man of a nature rarely adapted to the exigencies of pioneer life. Jacob Fun- 
died in 1845. They were the parents of twelve children, of whom William is 
the only survivor, and he has reached the ripe age of eighty-one. 

William Furr obtained his education in the early schools of Fountain 
county, and began the actual work of farming as soon as he was old enough 
to do so. He has spent his life in that vocation, and starting out with a strong 
body and clear brain, he slowly accumulated property and invested his savings, 
aided by the counsel and efforts of his wife. He was married on January 1, 
1855, to Mary Hesler, the daughter of Jacob and Frankie (Lightfoot) Hester. 
Her parents came from Kentucky about 1820, among the early settlers of the 
county. Her father had been a negro driver in Fleming county. To William 
and Mary Furr have been born five children: Elbert 11., of Mill Creek town- 
ship, a farmer; Elliott and Sylvian, farmers of the same township, and Jacob, 
who is at home. 

Not long ago Mr. Furr was the owner of three hundred and forty acres 
of fand in one of the best sections of Fountain county, and his crops were un- 
surpassed by those of any farm in the neighborhood. Now he has retired fn >m 
the greater part of the active work of farming, and has divided his land among 
his sons, reserving but sixty acres for himself, on which he lives content to look 
back over the achievements of his life and to give valuable advice when needed 
to his sons and younger neighbors. He made all the improvements now on 
his f-^rm. Mr. Furr is not a member of any lodge. His religious affiliations 
are with the Christian church, and he takes an active part in its work. His 
life has been spent in the community in which he now lives, and has been al- 
ways identified with its interests, while he is now one of its oldest residents, 
but is no less in touch with all that is going on about him. 



T. M. JACKSON. 



No resident of Kingman is better known in Fountain and surrounding 
counties than is T, M. Jackson, who has been for many years engaged in the 
stock business at Kingman, and while he has by his rare judgment and keen 
foresight' gained prosperity, he has not failed in acquiring a host of friends 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 4O5 

in his journeys about the country, and is a man whose genial comradeship and 
sterling worth have caused him to stand high in the appreciation of Fountain 
county people. 

T. M. Jackson was born in Rush county, Indiana, September 4. [861, 
the son of Samuel S. and Sara (Blair) Jackson. His parents were natives of 
North Carolina, and came to Rush county. Indiana, in [860. In 1878 they 
returned to their native state, and in 1892 came back to Indiana, this time lo- 
cating in Fountain county. Samuel S. Jackson was a hard-working and ener- 
getic farmer, well liked for his many excellent qualities wherever he went. 
He died in Fountain county in March, 1900. He was married twice, and was 
the father of eleven children, nine by his second wife, the mother of the su1>- 
ject of this sketch, who is living at an advanced age in Kingman, and who 
has the exceptional fortune of seeing ah her nine children still living, grown 
up and active in the world's affairs. 

In early youth Mr. Jackson attended the public schools and there re- 
ceived his education. His parents first came to Mill Creek township and later 
to Fulton, this county, but the subject has spent most of his life in .Mill ('reck 
township. At the age of twenty-one he started out for himself, and has been 
in the stock business ever since, beginning modest!)-, but gradually increasing 
the extent of his business, dealing in stock, buying, feeding and shipping, until 
now he ships from one hundred to one hundred and lift}' carloads yearly, and 
buys all over Fountain county, also in adjoining counties in Indiana and Illi- 
nois, owing his success entirely to his own efforts and management. He has 
also given a good deal of attention to the breeding of good horses, and at 
present has an imported Belgian stallion, which he has owned for five years, 
a three-year-old Percheron stallion and also keeps a Shire horse, a draft horse, 
and a jack at Aylesworth, while he has at Kingman a fine road trotting horse, 
whose superior can not be found in the county. In 1907 Mr. Jackson moved 
to Kingman, where he owns twenty-seven acres of land near the corporation 
limits, and he has since lived there, and makes this town the center of his 
stock buying and shipping. 

In 18S2 Mr. Jackson was married to Lydia A. Kiger, the daughter of 
Elias and Ann R. (Neal) Kiger. Her mother was a native of North Carolina, 
her father was born in this county near Silverwood, and was a farmer before 
entering the Sixty-third Indiana Infantry in the Civil war. He died in the 
army of the measles. Mr. and Mrs. Jackson are the parents of seven children, 
namely: W. P., who is assisting his father; Dottie, at home; Claude, a farmer 
of Mill Creek township; Artie, who married Fred Ewing, of Kingman; 
Charles C, of Silverwood, Indiana; and Lula and Straudie, at home. Frater- 



406 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

nally, Mr. Jackson is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
the Knights of Pythias and the Rebekahs. In politics he is a Republican. Ik- 
is one of the representative citizens of Kingman of whom the town may well 
be proud, for in his attaining prosperity for himself he has helped to bring 
added business to the town, and is always ready to aid in any enterprise for 
the good of the community. 



MILES MARSHALL. 



The statement is often made that the king of America today is the 
farmer. The man who owns beautiful farm lands, in the state of Indiana, fully 
improved, and loves his stock and his work, is by far richer, more independent, 
and happier than the most influential financier on Wall street. Miles Mar- 
shall is the owner of some of the prettiest farms in Fountain county, is one 
of the largest land owners and most influential men there. 

His grandfather, Thomas Marshall, was of English descent, his ancestors 
having come over to this country from England, and settled on a farm in 
North Carolina, where Thomas Marshall and his son Isaac were born, the 
latter in 1S14. After his father's death Isaac brought the family to Indiana, 
where he married Nancy Lindley. Her father, Reuben Lindley, was also born 
in North Carolina, and came to Fountain county, Indiana, in 18^5. He farmed 
in Mill Creek township for many years, and died there when he was almost 
ninety years of age. 

Miles Marshall was born in Fountain county March 10, 1850. In 1880 
he married Ella E. Dice, daughter of Flenry and Charlotte (Rice) Dice. (For 
the history of the Dice family see sketch of Franklin Dice in this work.) They 
had two children. Walter D. Marshall married Olive Myers, and is now living 
on the farm, helping his father run the old home place. Clinton B. Marshall 
married Jessie Talbott, daughter of Doctor Talbott, of Crawfordsville, In- 
diana, and is a prominent lawyer in Indianapolis. Both boys were given a 
good education and both graduated at Wabash College, CrawfofdsyOe, In- 
diana, in 1904. 

Mr. Marshall has four hundred and seventy-seven acres of land in Van 
Buren township, two miles and a half from Veedcrsburg, Indiana. He farms 
his land generally, and also deals in graded hogs and other blooded stock. Mr. 
Marshall has made a great many improvements on the place, and has one of 
the most modernly equipped farms in the district. He is also interested in 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 407 

several Veedersburg interests, and spent a part of his life in that place. He 
lias lived on the old home farm for eighteen years, and nine years was spent 
on his farm south of Veedersburg. 

Mr; Marshall is a Republican, but sometimes votes independently. He is 
a member of the United Brethren church. He is also a member of the Knights 
of Pythias at Veedersburg, Indiana. 

Although he is a very prominent man in the community, and one of the 
most influential and wealthiest men in Fountain county. Mr. Marshall is mod- 
est and retiring, and spends his time working instead of talking about it. He 
is very well liked in the country around Veedersburg, and is looked upon as 
one of the old aristocrats of the place who has helped to make Indiana what it 
is. It is such men that have made Indiana the beautiful country that delights 
the eye as one passes through on train or iuterurban, and have made the soil 
productive, produced crops that have stimulated trade, and made this century 
one of progress. 



CHARLES F. SMITH. 

One of the first citizens and most influential men of Kingman, Indiana, 
is Charles F. Smith, postmaster at that place since January, 189X, and active 
in all the interests of the community. The public spirit which his father ex- 
pressed has found increased life in the son, and he has not only held his place 
in the service of the government with credit, but carefully worked out his in- 
dividual prosperity and service as a private citizen. 

His father, Col. John T. Smith, was born in Johnson county, Indiana, in 
183 1. He availed himself of the best education afforded by the state of In- 
diana at that time, attending old Asbury College (now DePauw University) 
and Indiana University. He first followed the law, practicing in Greene and 
Clay counties, but later felt that his real work was in the ministry and became 
one of the most influential Methodist ministers in Greene county. He also 
found time, however, to participate actively in all the affairs of his commun- 
ity, and lost no opportunity to do good in every line. He held the position of 
clerk of Greene county for two terms. When he died, in 1908, at the ripe age 
of seventy-seven, his loss was keenly felt by the whole community, as well as 
by his large family, six of whom are still living. His wife, Mary C. (Ann- 
strong) Smith, was born in Greene county, Indiana. She is still living, and 
is at Terre Haute, Indiana, with her daughter. 

Their son Charles spent his early life and received his education and 



408 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

training at Bowling Green, Indiana, where later in his life, for four years, 
he Occupied the position of postmaster. He came to Fountain county and lo- 
cated at Kingman, in 1895. There he engaged in the jewelry business, and 

has been very successful. Later, Mr. Smith added to the scope of his busi- 
ness and has dealt in notions also. In 1898 he became postmaster, and has 
held that position since that time. 

In 1892, Mr. Smith was married to Iva O. Comer, the daughter of 
Emery and Mary ( Peyton) Comer. She was of the same good stock of that 
part of Indiana, her father being a farmer in Owen county, and she grew up 
in close friendship with nature, from whom we learn such valuable lessons of 
life. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have two children, Mary Lucile and Dorothy Jane, 
both of whom are living at home with their parents. 

Mr. Smith is a Republican of the stanch old school He is active in a 
number of lodges and associations, among which are the Knights of Pythias, 
Lodge No. 24. He is also a member of Camp No. 3621, Modern Woodmen of 
America. 

Mr. Smith is the type of the man who has done well the duty which he 
has found nearest, — the kind of men that have made the good state of Indiana 
stand high in the political and social life of the country. He has spent his life 
in central Indiana, and proved that there is no better place to find work to do, 
and happiness to enjoy, than in the place that we arc given in which to work. 



OLIVER W. McGAUGHEY. 

It is interesting as well as instructive to study the methods by wdiich the 
individual rises by his own efforts from an inauspicious environment to a 
place of importance in the community, to note the lines along which progress 
has been made, which work of advancement has rendered possible the ad- 
vancement of the general good along material, civic and moral lines. One of 
the well known and influential citizens of Fountain county, Indiana, who has 
not only Avon success for himself in the face of obstacles, but has also done 
much toward the general upbuilding of the locality of which this history deals 
is Oliver W. McGaughey, attorney at law, at Veedersburg, who is also en- 
gaged in the loan and insurance business. 

Mr. McGaughey was born near Greencastle, Indiana, December 20, 1870. 
He is the son of Jacob and Mary A. (Leonard) McGaughey, natives of Put- 
nam county, Indiana. The family came originally from the north of Ireland, 



i Ms 





^^^UjMW^^i^ 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 409 

the first of the name to take up his residence in the New World being William 
McGaughey; the great-great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch; he was 
a soldier in the Revolutionary war. The family founded the town of Mc- 
Gaugheysville, Virginia. Michael McGaughey, the subject's paternal grand- 
father, moved from Pennsylvania to Kentucky, and later he left the Blue 
Grass state and took up his residence in Putnam county, Indiana, where lie 
devoted the balance of his life to agricultural pursuits. The Leonards came 
originally from Germany and for many years made their homes in North 
Carolina, from which state they moved to Putnam county, Indiana, in an 
early day, where, like the McGaugheys, they became well established. 

Four children were born to Jacob McGaughey and wife, namely: George 
Stanley, who is a minister in the Christian church at Bicknell, Indiana; Charles 
E. is an attorney at Roachdale, Indiana, and he is at present postmaster at 
that place; Minnie married Al Call, a mechanic, of Morton, Indiana; and 
Oliver W-, subject of this sketch. 

Jacob McGaughey, father of the above named children, was a member 
of the Christian church, as was also his wife, and politically he was a Repub- 
lican. When the Civil war came on he enlisted, in 1 86 r , for ninety days, under 
the first call for troops. He re-enlisted and rose to the rank of first lieutenant', 
proving a very faithful soldier for the union, and he was honorably dis- 
charged at Huntsville, Alabama. 

Oliver W. McGaughey received his early education in the common 
schools, later attending Shurtleff College, at Alton, Illinois, and he also took 
a four years' course at Wabash College, Crawfordsville, Indiana, from which 
he was graduated in the year 1899 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He 
took post-graduate work in Butler College, Irvington, a suburb of Indianapo- 
lis, studying there one year. Thus well equipped for life's struggles, he en- 
tered the ministry, becoming pastor of the Sixth Christian church at Indian- 
apolis, where he remained three years, then accepted the pastorate of the Cen- 
tral Christian church at Columbus, Indiana, where he remained two years; 
he then had a call to the First Christian church at Everett, Washington, where 
he spent two years. Although as a minister he was very successful, greatly 
strengthening the congregations of the charges mentioned above and winning 
the hearty approval of all concerned, he gave up this line of endeavor, and in 
1906 he returned to Indiana and, upon the death of his father-in-law, he en- 
tered the drug business at Veedersburg, Fountain county, continuing the same 
for two years. Since that time he has been engaged in the practice of law, in 
connection with which he carries on a loan and insurance business in Veed- 
ersburg. He has been very successful in these varied lines of endeavor and is 



4IO FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES. INDIANA. 

today one of the leading business men and substantial citizens of Veedersburg 
and one of Fountain county's most progressive men of affairs, his business 
constantly growing through his close application and honesl dealings with his 
fellow men. 

Mr, McGaughey was first married- on November i. 1809. to Alberta 
Booe, daughter of Art and Elvesa (Glasscock) Booe, to which union one child 
was born, Gilbert Arthur .McGaughey. On September 17, 1911, Mr. Mc- 
Gaughey was united in marriage with Ardella Inlow, daughter of John Inlow 
and wife, of Veedersburg. 

Mr. McGaughey is a member of the Christian church here; he is an elder 
in the same and he preaches part of the time. Politically, he is a Republican 
and has long been more or less active in the ranks and influential during cam- 
paigns. He is chairman of the Fountain county central committee. He was 
elected mayor of Veedersburg in 1909, but resigned after serving in this ca- 
pacity for a period of one year. As a public servant he has discharged his 
duties in a manner that has reflected much credit upon himself and to the 
eminent satisfaction of all concerned. Fraternally, he belongs to the Masonic 
order, the Modern Woodmen of America, Tribe of Ben-Ilur, and the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, also the Phi Delta Thcla. a college fraternity. 



JAMES R. SONGER. 

One of the prettiest country homes in Van Buren township, Fountain 
county, Indiana, is that of James R. Songer, three miles from Veedersburg. 
Mr. Songer has lived on this place all of his life and has improved it con- 
stantly. He is one of the foremost citizens and most influential men in that 
district, and has the distinction of being of a family of the first settlers in that 
part of Indiana. 

Adam Songer, his grandfather, came to Indiana from Virginia in 1826, 
and settled on land in Fountain county. This land was signed over to him by 
John Quincy Adams, President of the United States, in 1826, and has never 
passed out of the family. James R. Songer was born February 24, i860, in 
the old home place, where his father, James Songer, was born in 1828. James 
Songer taught school in the old log cabin school house for several winters. He 
farmed all of his life. He married Sarah J. lsley and they had nine children: 
James R. ; Walts, who lives in Tulare, California ; Arthur, who is with James 
R. Hardy, a druggist at Veedersburg; Julian, who is dead; Manford, who also 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. -J 1 1 

lives in Van Biiren township; Florence, who married William Gookins and 
lives in Van I'.uren township; nn<\ Court, who is also a fanner in the same dis- 
trict. One child died in infancy. 

James R. Songer married Alice Vandeventer, the daughter of John Van- 
deventer, who was horn in New Jersey, February 5, 1832, and moved to Mill 
Creek township, Fountain county, Indiana, where he still lives. His wife was 
Elizabeth (Keeley) Vandeventer. They had a family of four children. (For 
the history of the Vandeventer family see sketch in. this work-.) James R. 
Songer and his wife live in the old Songer place, which he bought from the 
rest of the heirs, on eighty acres of the land originally settled by his grand- 
father. He has remodeled the old place and brought it to a high state of culti- 
vation. They had four children: Guy married Delia Mullen, and they live 
near Veedersburg on a farm ; Katie married Luther Mullen, and they live on a 
farm near the old home place; Roy and Glenn are at home. 

James R. Songer and wife own one hundred and eighty-three acres of 
land in Van Buren township and one acre in Veedersburg. He farms about 
one hundred and thirty acres of it generally and raises a hue grade of Poland 
China hogs. He also buys and fattens cattle for the market. 

Mr. Songer has been energetic and untiring in his work on tin land 
which his father settled. He has brought it to a high degree of cultivation 
and production and his place is up-to-date and in a fine condition. The result 
of the work of such men in the country is far-reaching. They build up trade, 
furnish food for the thousands who live cooped up in the cities, and instill 
into the life of the nation fresh, pure young blood, direct from contact with 
nature. We should never fail to recognize the fact that it is because of the 
work of our forefathers in carving out a nation in the wilderness that the 
United States is what it is today. 



GEORGE F. SINES. 



The life of George F. Sines reads almost like a book of fiction. There we 
find the hardship of the pioneer's life, the building up of the home in the new- 
West to a large and prosperous estate, to leave it at the call of his country and 
take part in one of the most terrible wars that the world has ever known. 

George F. Sines was born in Fountain county September 26, 1840. His 
father and mother, Joseph and Mary Ann (Griffith) Sines, were born in Phila- 
delphia county, Pennsylvania. They came west in the early days, and settled 



412 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

in Cain township, Fountain county, Indiana, where they farmed for a while, 

and later moved to Mill Creek township, and both have died. 

George F. Sines received his education from the common schools and die 

farm, where he spent forty year- of his life. In 1851 he married Cal 
Rayphole, daughter of Anthony and Elizabeth (Redman) Rayphole. Mr. 
Rayphole was also a farmer of Fountain county, coming here from ( >hio. I ie 
was a prominent man in the community and spent the end of his days there. 
In 1892 Mrs. Sines died, leaving nine children to endeavor to fill her place in 
the home. 

Marjorie C. Sines, the oidest daughter, married James Ward, a druggist 
at Veedersburg, Indiana. Barbara married John B. Condon, a railroad con 
ductor, and is now living in Chicago, Illinois. Sylvester B. Sines married 
Nora Crowder, and is now living at Yeddo, Indiana, and Nellie G. Sines mar- 
ried Fred Beal and is also living at that place. Lottsee C. Sines married 
Byron Thomas, and li\es near Danville. Illinois. The rest 
J. G., Mary A. and Clara E. Sines, live at home with their 
Indiana, where he has been in the general mercantile business 
He has a splendid general store there, with about four the 
stock, and has been very prosperous. He has built up and 1 
farm and added to his possessions constantly. Mr. Sines 
hundred and twenty-two acres of land, two hundred and ti 
hue tillable soil. 

When volunteers were called in 1862, Mr. Sines left hi 
i'y, and enlisted in the Sixty-third Indiana Infantry, serving first under Cap- 
tain Conover, and later under Capt. Schuyler La Tourette. With those brave 
and true men of the sixties, he fought from Chattanooga to Atlanta, where 
he was wounded. Then followed a siege amid the horrors of the hospitals, at 
Knoxville and Nashville, Tennessee. Notwithstanding the fact that he had 
already served the cause so faithfully Mr. Sines continued in the service until 
the end of the war and was honorably discharged July 3, 1865, to return home 
and lend his aid there in the civil life, as he had as a soldier. 

Mr. Sines is one of the leading Republicans in Yeddo, and for fifteen 
years was postmaster at that place. He is also a Mason of Lodge No. 636, at 
Yeddo. The firm determination in everything undertaken and the untiring 
work in every cause of right that Mr. Sines has shown, characterize the men 
who have been victorious in all walks of life.. We look with interest on the 
accomplishments of the man who has made all he has himself, and see how in 
gaining prosperity for himself he has given prosperity to his county and state 
as well. 



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FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 4T3 

GARRET GRADY.. 

History proves that the men who have found their early education strug- 
gling with nature, the men who have been forced to wrest a livelihood from 
the earth, ami earned everything they have gained, have been the ones who 
have, stamped themselves indelibly upon their communities and their country 
and haw done the most to place the United States in its present place m the 
world today. One of the self-made men and war veterans of whom the citizens 
of Fountain county are proud is Garret Grady, whose family was one of the 
first settling in this part of Indiana. 

Mr. Grady was born in Fountain county. February 22, 1833. His father, 
Reuben Grady, was born October 26, 1806, in Kentucky and came to Indiana 
in the early thirties. He took land from the government in Van P.iuen town- 
ship. Fountain county, and lived there until his death, in 1897. The subject's 
mother was Margaret (Pearson; Grady, who died in 1887. They had eleven 
children: William, John, Allen, Garret, Newton, Reuben, Man J.. Jessie, 
Samuel, Kitty Ann and James F., all of whom, excepting Garret, are dead. 

On February 18, 1868, Garret Grady married Emily Isley, daughter of 
David and Rachael (Chumlea) Isley. He was born in Fountain county, In- 
diana, and died in 1850. She was born in Tennessee, and died September 8, 
1894. Both families were old settlers and farmers. John Chumlea was one of 
the first settlers in that part of the country and was a gunsmith by trade, as 
well as a millwright. David and Rachael isley had two children, Alary Jane, 
who died when she was young, and Emily, who married Garret Grady. David 
Isley was a farmer and died at the age of twenty-seven years. 

Garret Grady had four children : Dora Belle and Harry are both dead. 
Hardy Grady lives on an adjoining farm and runs the old home place, and Ed- 
ward is a lineman for the Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad. Mr. Grady 
has one hundred and sixty acres of land in Mill Creek township, which he has 
cleared himself and has changed it from a primeval wilderness to a high state 
of cultivation. He had made all of the improvements himself and has a very 
comfortable home now, to take the place of the old log cabin, originally built 
by his grandfather, Jacob Isley, who obtained the land from the government 
and in which they first lived. 

In 1862, Garret Grady left his productive farm, his home and family 
and joined Company H of the Sixty-third Indiana Infantry, under Capt. 
Schuyler La Tourette in Sherman's army, and fought from "Atlanta to the 
sea. - ' He took part in battles at Resaca and Atlanta, and chased Hood across 
the country, fighting at Franklin and Nashville, Tennessee. He spent the 



414 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

next three months in the hospital at Troy, New York, and was mustered out 
in May, 1865, and returned to his home. 

He has served his country as faithfully in the capacity of an active citizen 
as he did as a soldier during the war. He and all of his family are members 
of the Christian church and active in all movements for the good of their 
community. Air. Grady lias made all lie has by hard work, and his reward has 
been plentiful. He lias not only given to his country in the cause of freedom 
all that was within his power but, in building up his personal prosperity, he- 
has left a great heritage of good for those who come after him. 

The subject's son Hardy enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and 
Fifth-eighth Indiana Volunteers in the Spanish-American war ami served six 
months. 



ALLEN SUMMERS. 



;le all he 




him- 


i'S just w 


hat 


it i^ 


appalled 


by 


smai: 


, product 


ive 


farn 


te that is 


in 


itself 



There is a peculiar attraction about a man who h 
self; he enjoys everything more intensely because he 
worth, and he has laid a foundation of character that 
obstacles. The farmer who has himself to thank for 
ami good stock, has a satisfaction in every part of hi 
a reward for work well done. 

Allen Summers, of Fountain county, Indiana, has cause for such satisfac- 
tion and opportunity for such enjoyment. His is a family that has grown up 
with the country. His grandfather, Elijah Summers, was a farmer in Jack- 
son township when Fountain county was in its infancy, and his grandfather, 
George Redenbaugh, took land from the government in Mill Creek township 
when there were only two men here, and, risking all the dangers of the pio- 
neer's life, cleared his ground and cultivated his farm until his death. His 
father and mother, N. M. and Delila (Redenbaugh) Summers, were both born 
in Fountain county. He was born in Jackson township, and has been one of 
the foremost farmers in that part of the country. They still live on the old 
homestead, he being seventy-one years of age and she seventy. They had 
five children: George died in infancy; Lydia married Thomas Day, and 
Samantha married Thomas Norris, both living on farms in Mill Creek town- 
ship; John married Luella Day, a native of the same county. 

Allen Summers, the oldest son, was born in Mill Creek township, Febru- 
ary 16, 1864, and spent his early life on the farm, gaining an education that 
has been valuable to him in his later years. In 1884 he married Mosuri Leon- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 4I5 

arc!, daughter of Alii and Mildred (Lambdon) Leonard. They were originally 
farmers in Orange county, where he died. Mildred was brought to this county 
by her mother and step- father. They have two children, Clarence II.. who 
married Mabel Reed, is a merchant in Steam Corner, Indiana, and Walter Lee. 
who is at home now, after having graduated from Indiana University, at 
Bloomington, Indiana, and Yale University. At Vale he did remarkably well 
in all of his studies, and was given the title Doctor of Jurisprudence, which 
has never been given there before. He also has the degrees of Bachelor of 
Arts and Doctor of Law. 

Allen Summers owns eighty acres of fine farming land, highly cultivated, 
and is making money, selling his cream from some fine Jersey cows to the 
creamery in Yeddo, Indiana. He has a large barn and silo and has every mod- 
ern convenience on his place, which he built himself. In fact he has made 
almost all of the improvements on a remarkably productive and well equipped 
farm. 

Mr, Summers is a Democrat, who has never neglected his farm to hold 
any office. He is a Mason at Yeddo, and is held in high e>teem by his neigh- 
bors in the district as a valuable citizen and a man of sound judgment and 
level head, who can appreciate what he and others have, because he has made 
all he owns himself. 



HENRY LAWSOX. 



Some of the best blood in America is due to the Irish, who came to this 
country in search of freedom; loyal, trustworthy, lug-hearted, and naturally 
leaders of men, settling in the fanning districts and giving to their communi- 
ties generously of the best in themselves. Henry Lawson's great-grandfather 
was one of these, and one can still trace his influence in the attitude of Henry 
Lawson toward Mill Creek township and his popularity in that region. 

This man, with the fire of the Emerald isle in his veins, came to Virginia 
and located on a farm, where his son John was born. He, also, felt the call 
of the West, and after farming for a while in the old state, came to Parke 
county, Indiana, and established the home farm, carving out his home in the 
wilderness. He married Catherine Brent, a native of Montgomery county. 
She died in 1864, leaving ten children, of whom Laura, Walter, William and 
Mary are dead and Rachel, James, Emma, John, Rebecca and Henry are still 
living. John Lawson then took a second wife, Melissa (Huff mire) Lawson, 
and has two children by this marriage, Manson and Nettie. He was a Demo- 



4 16 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

crat, and was justice of the peace for many years, well known throughout the 
country around for his kindly and just nature and careful dealing with all 
cases that came under his jurisdiction. He was a i i ber oi hi ! " 
church, and died in [899 on the old home place. 

Henry Law son was born on the home faun in Parke county, Sugar Creek 
township, September 8, 1856. He was married there in 1878 to Florence Sow 
ers. Just five hours after the marriage, however, she was killed, due to an un- 
fortunate accident in the charivari. Mr. Lawson afterward married Phebe 
Barker, daughter of Bryant and Annie (Sowers) Barker, who were old set- 
tlers of Parke county, having come originally from North Carolina, and were 
prominent farmers in the county. They have seven children, Alan ford, John, 
Joe, Amanda, Emma, George and Wilson, the latter of whom is dead. 

Henry Lawson has lived in Mill Creek township. Fountain county, for 
twenty-three years and has been very prosperous. He has a farm of thirty 
acres of line tillable soil, and, has brought his land to a high degree of cultiva- 
tion. He has been very active in the affairs of his community, and is looked 
up to by his neighbors as <> ; n' of the brightest and most able men in the town- 
ship. He has been township trustee, to which offici as el :cted in 1908. 
and also held the offii hi] deput) 
assessor for three years. He lias been aggressive, making il the mprove- 
ments on his place, nine miles from Veedersburg, Indiana, himself, helping 
along with even' public work and using his influence for good in every op- 
portunity which .ias presented itself. Mr. Lawson is a Universabst by belief, 
and is a Mason at Yeddo. His wife is also a social factor in the community, 
and is a member of the Eastern Star, to which order her husband also belongs, 
as well as the Royal Neighbors. 

Mr. Lawson is a good example of the law that says that as we give we 
receive, and he has prospered, and is the type of the citizen who has made 
Indiana the prosperous state that it is today. 



THEODORE M. MEEKER. 

While Fountain county has many excellent farms, and many of its citi- 
zens can be reckoned successful farmers, there can be found no better farm 
for all general purposes than the Shawnee Site farm, near Attica, and no more 
successful farmer and stock raiser than its owner, Theodore M. Meeker, for 
he by his years of experience has demonstrated the practical value of farming, 
and, moreover, the practical value of giving more than ordinary attention to 
the operations of farming and the care of stock. He was born on the old Dry 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 4I7 

Run farm in Richland township, Fountain county, on February 22. 1852, the 
son of Usual Halford and Sarah (Dudley) Meeker. His education was begun 
in the common schools, then at the aye of eighteen lie attended Vlerom Col- 
lege for six months. He then look up farming am! stock raising, winch he has 
since continued. His parents moved in April, 1856, to the farm where he has 
since and now lives. 

On December j_\ 1894, Mr. Meeker was married to Julia Virginia Mc- 
Knight, the daughter of Linton and Margaret (Mai Knight. To 

this union were horn four children: Frank married fir.-i Calma May Thomp- 
son, by whom he had two children. T. M. am] Irene, and was later married to 
Edith Quiggle, who has borne to him one daughter, M. Virginia; Jacob E. 
married Maud Larr, and is the father of three children. Ofin B., Naomi and 
Miriam; the third child died in infancy, and the fourth, O. M., married Bar- 
key Galloway and has two children. Gerald Don and I tarold. 

Mr. Meeker is the owner of Shawnee Site farm of five hundred and fort) 
five acres, of which four hundred acres are under cultivation. He at one time 
owned one thousand and fifty-five acres. The farm is well improved, with 
good hams and a handsome and' substantial home, and .shows on every hand 
the evidences of careful and practical farming. For more than twenty years 
Mr. Meeker ha- been a breeder of Aberdeen Migus cattle, and the cattle 
coming from his farm are justly admired by the buyers and the' neighbors. 
Since 1909, in partnership with his son, Orville M., he has been engaged in 
dairying. ]Mr. Meeker has also been active in other business interests bes es 
farming. lie is a director of the Mutual Insurance Company of Mi 1 . 
and Fountain counties. He has always taken an active interest in bringing to 
the attention of his fellow farmers the latest and best methods of cultivation 
and operation of farms, and has been for some time president of the Farmers 
Institute. For thirty years he has been an active member and at one time he 
was first advisory councilman of the Horse Thief Detective Association. 
In politics he is a Republican, and is a member of the county council. 

Mr. Meeker is a conscientious member of the Christian church, in which 
he has been a deacon for twenty years, and for the same length of time a mem- 
ber of the Western Indiana conference and treasurer of the local mission 
board for the conference. He is also a trustee of Merom College. He has been 
active in church work, and believes in a thorough extension and application of 
the Gospel as the best remedy for all the evils of the day. Standing among 
the first rank of farmers, and a citizen who has ever used his strong influence 
to the betterment in every way of the condition of those around him, he is a 
man whose high reputation is deservedly founded Upon a basis of sturdy and 
upright character. 

(2/) 



418 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES., INDIANA. 

JOHN WESLEY METSKER. 

The subject of this sketch is one of the leading Farmers and stock raisers 
of the township in which lie resides and as a citizen, alive to all that tend to 
pi imotc the interests of the community and benefit his fellow men, he stands a 
conspicuous example of the intelligent, broad-minded American of today. 
John VVesle) Metsker is descended paternally from Teutonic ancestry, and 
traces his family history hack through several generations t< > Germany, of 
which country his great-grandfather, Jacob Metsker. was a native. Isaac 
Metsker, son of Jacob Metsker, came to America many wars ago and ivas 
among the earliest settlers of Warren county, Indiana, where he purchased 
land from the government and made a number of substantial improvements. 
The original family homestead is near Pine Village, and it was there that the 
subject's father, John K. Metsker, spent the greater part of his life and 
achieved distinctive success as an enterprising tiller of the soil. John R. 
Metsker was horn in 1817 in Ohio, came to Indiana with his parents when 
quite young and departed this life on the family homestead in the month of 
April, 1888. His wife, a native of North Carolina, died m the year icjoj. 

John Wesley Metsker was born Septemher 2S, 1842. in Warren county, 
Indiana, and has spent all of his life in the vicinity of the original farm which 
his grandfather entered. Me was reared to agricultural pursuits, early chose 
farming for his vocation and has followed that honorable calling with marked 
success ever since, being at this time one of the leading agriculturists and stock 
raisers of Mill Creek township and among the most enterprising and progres- 
sive citizens of Fountain county. 

Mr. Metsker has a fine farm of one hundred forty acres, which he has 
brought to a high state of cultivation, and on which are some of the best build- 
ings and other improvements in the above township. In connection with 
tilling the soil, he gives much attention to Live stock, in the breeding and rais- 
ing of which he has few equals and no superiors in his part of the state. For 
a number of years he has made a specialty of line Jersey cattle, principally 
for dairy purposes, and Po'and China hogs, while his horses, of which he 
keeps from twelve to fifteen, are of standard breeds and noted far and wide 
for their many points of excellence. Associated with him in the raising of 
horses is his son, Webb Metsker, an intelligent and. wide-awake young man 
whose knowledge of horseflesh and how to develop strong, beautiful and sym- 
metrical animals is second to that of no other man in the county similarly 
engaged. At the present time they have a number of line pacers and trotters 
which have won their full share id" prizes, in addition to which their fine ani- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, (NDIANA. 4J<) 

mals of the Belgian breed have also attracted much attention from horse men 
and others interested in introducing improved live stock among the fanners 
of the county; 

Mr ; Metsker keeps abreast of the times on all mailers of public import 
and, though not a politician in the usual sense of the term, he manifests a 
lively interest in the leading questions and issues of the times and gives his 
support to the Republican party. His domestic life dates from the year -1870, 
when he was happily married to Sarah Little, whose father, George Little, 
was a native of Ohio and an early settlor of Warren county, Indiana, wl ere 
his death occurred some years ago. Mr. and .Mrs. Metsker have had live 
children, the oldest of whom, Carrie, married A X. Rord, a farmer and school 
teacher of Mill Creel-: township, and has a daughter of her own, seventeen 
years of age: William. Everett and Raymond died young; Newton Webb 
is the youngest of the family. The last named, who, as already indicated, is 
associated with his father in fanning and rearing of live stock, was married 
in January, 1912, to Edna Alice Moore, daughter of George Moor, , deceased, 
and lives on the home place with his parents, lie is a man of high standing, be- 
longing to the lodge at Kingman, an energetic farmer and business man. and 



J \MES II. CRANE. 

Among the progressive farmers of Van Buren township worthy of 
special notice in a work of this character is the well known gentleman under 
whose name the following lines are written. Henry Crane, father of the sub- 
ject, was born in Warren county, Ohio, in 1808, came to Fountain county, 
Indiana, many years ago and improved the farm in Van Buren township 
which James H. now owns. He was an industrious tiller of the soil, a praise- 
worthy citizen and departed this life in 1894, lamented by all who knew him. 
Evaline Simmerman, wife of Henry Crane and mother of the subject, is a 
native of Fountain county, Indiana. 

James H. Crane was burn February 7. 1857, in Fountain county. Indiana, 
and received his early education in the public school. Actuated by a laudable 
desire to increase bis scholastic knowledge, he subsequently entered Union 
Christian College in Sullivan county, where he pursued his studies for two 
years, during which time he finished the teacher's course with the object in 
view of engaging in educational work. After one term in the school room, 
however, he decided to adopt some other vocation; accordingly be turned his 



-five 


■ acres in 




with ex- 




e best in 




ivarious 


Cr; 


ine lin. is 


ful 


« ith the 



420 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

attention to agriculture, which he has since followed with gratifying sin 
being at this time one of the enterprising Farmers of Van Buren township, as 
well as a representative citizen of the community in which he resides. For 
1 tie pears Mr. Crane paid considerable attentioi to live >to l< and was suc- 
cessful in the breeding and the raising of high-grade Poland China hogs, but 
of late he has grow" grain almost exclusively, diough keeping some cattle, 
which add very materially to lit.-, income The farm winch he owns consists 
of one hundred and sixty-eight acres of fine land, all except twent; 
cultivation and highly improved. The unimproved trad i 
cedent timber, maple predominating, and his sugar camp is one 1 
the country. This woods, which is little disturbed, ts the h ' I 
kinds of wild animals and during certain seasons of the year Ah 
recreation in hunting this game, being a keen sportsman and ski 
gun. As already indicated, the Crane farm was first settled by the sub 
father, who cleared the greater part, of the land and made n >st of the im- 
provements. Under the efficient management of the present proprieto . 
has remodeled the buildings and added other no one 

the best farms in the township and as a place of residence it answers every 
purpose which a comfortable and atti active rural home is designed to subserve. 
In the year of 1883 Mr. Crane contracted .1 matrimonial alliance with 
Margaret CoSfing, daughter of Dayton and Margaret (Marques 
which union two children were born, Glenn, who married [mi a Campbell and 
manages the home place, and Fred, who assists in the cultivation of the farm 
and who is also married, his wife having formerly been Lena Beverj of this 
county. In public -matters Mr. Crane has well settled convictions and his read 
ing and investigation have led him to espouse the cause of ocialtsm , tl 
best and surest correction for prevalent national evils, lie is a reader and 
thinker, well informed on the great questions of the times and keeps in close 
touch with current events, on all of which he has well grounded and decided 
opinions. The mother of Mr. Crane is still living at a good old age and makes 
her home under his roof. 



GEORGE M. HOUSER. 

No family has been better known, and few as well, as the Housers, for 
they have been prominently connected with the affairs of Fountain county for 
three-quarters of a century, during which time they have played well their 
several parts in the general development of the same and have borne unassail- 




tff. M /VtTU4£A- 



FOUNTAIN \.ND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

able reputations. Since the family established theii permanent home in the 
wilderness here the county has developed From a wild, sparsel) settled section 
to one of the leading farming communiti' of tin tate. They could fi 
the greal future in store for those who were willing to remain here and work 
diligently. 

George M. Houser, one of the substantial Farmers of Richland township, 

Fountain county, was born January 4, 1848, in this township and county, and 

son of Jonathan and Sarah 1 Newer) Houser. The father was born in 

Virginia, December _>(>, 1803, and there he spenl his boyhood days lie 

near what is now X 

ivho married fonathl 



his native s 


tate to 


Fountain county. Indiana, and settled 


wtown. lie 


and S; 


irah Newer were married March 18. 


ie the paren 
h Garver, \ 

s | ,1 




en, namely: Mary Catherine, 
[2, 1835; Abraham \\\. of 
[837; John W., bom February 18, 


i) [9, [&] i ; 




izabeth, wife of John Neil, of Hills- 

' R 1 if Cain township, this 

iew, is the youngest. 


set was rear 




.he old homestead and he received a 


1 the public 


.school 


s of his community. On March zj, 


.11 marriage ■ 




la Bible, daughtei of Job 1 ai d Mary 


were early s 




in Montgomery county, Indi 1 



George M, Hou 
practical education i 
1884. he was unite. 1 
(May) Bible. They 
subject's wife died in (904 at th< je < :ai mi m was 

without issue 

Air. Houser is a Prohibitionist, but has never sought or held public office. 
He is a member of the Anti-Horse Thief Association ai Dry Run, this county. 
He belongs to the Christian (New Light) church. 

The >ubjeet is the owner of one hundred and sixty acres of fine land, 
which he has kept well improved, having built a good barn and other build- 
ings, and he has made a pronounced success as a general farmer and stock 
raiser, lie still lives in the log cabin, which has been added to and made a 
sort of bungalow, an attractive and picturesque old place, it being the original 
house built here by his father in 1834, and is thus seventy-eight years old. The 
father came into possession of the place now owned by his son, George M. 
Houser, in 1834 and here he developed a good farm and spent the rest of his 
life, dying on July 24, 1870, at the age of sixty-six years and six months. He 
was well known throughout the county in the early period of her history and 
he did much for the general good of his immediate community, and bore a 
good reputation, being especially noted for his hospitality and his close adher- 
ence to the Golden Rule. 



422 FOUNTAIN AM) WARREN CO! .-.[IIS, INDIANA. 

LEANDER SONGER. 

The subject of this review, who has joined nl majority and gone 

to his reward, as an honored citizen of Fountain county whose lite ai 
lluence made for trie good of all with whom he came in contact. A God-fear- 
ing man. honest and upright in a'! of his dealings and esteemed b\ a 
circle of friends and neighbors, his death was felt a.- a personal l<»s by many 
and his place in the community where he so long resided will lie difficult to 
fill. 

Leander Songer was horn in Fountain county, Indiana, in the ye; 
the son of Adam Songer, who came to this part of the state from Virginia in 
pioneer times and entered a tract of land in Van Buren township, which he 
cleared and on which he spent the remainder of his life. (See sketch of j. R. 
Songer.) The subject was reared on the family homestead, attended such 
schools a- the country afforded during his childhood and youth and on arriv- 
ing at manhood's estate lie turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, which 
he followed with encouraging success t.. the end of in-, days He tvas a man 



juahties 
institute 



iwnship, this county, the father being one 
1 1 j indicated. Two children were born to 
the older of whom, Frank, is a physician and surgeon 
le married Ida Jan way, and is one of the successful 
medical men of the town in which he resides. Anna S., the second in order 
of birth, is the wife of Albert Henderson, a tomb-stone cutter of Lafavctte and 
one of the esteemed residents of that city. In addition to her own children, 
Mrs. Songer opened her heart and home to a youth by the name of Raymond 
Boes, whom she took from an orphan home at the age of eighteen ami to 
whom she has since devoted the same love and care that she would have shown 
to one of her own -flesh and blood. The young man still lives with his foster 
mother and assists her in the management of her affairs and in looking after 
the interests of the fine farm of one hundred and twenty acres on which she 
lives and which, under her judicious direction, is now one of the most beauti- 
ful and desirable rural homes in the township of Van Buren. 



line of 


Ins .'ai 


ling he 




engagei 


1. He 


possess( 


:d in a 1 


win est 


eem an 


d beget 


confiden 


minded 
Ln 


citizen 
the >•( E 


Ship he ■ 
IT 1858 . 


A r. Son 


whose | 


parents. 


, Umber 


m m and 


among 


the ear 


ly pione 


ers of T 


of the I 


irst me 


chanics 


in the t< 


Mr. an, 


:1 Mrs. 


Sorter 


the old 


of Hillsboro, 1 


Indiana. 


He m; 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 423 

Mr. Songer was an uncompromising supporter of the Republican part} 
and wielded a strong influence in local political affairs, though never an 
an! for office. He always tried to live up to his high ideals of life and dut< 
and, as stated in a preceding paragraph, h< ever stood for law and ordi i 
for whatever made for the best interests of his fellowmen. lie was 
from the scenes of his earthly trials and triumphs on the 27th day of .March. 
[909, at the ripe old age of seventy-three years, his death being. widely and 
cleeplj lamented by the large number of neighb > ns who had learned 

to prize him for his manly character and sterling worth. 



WILLIAM P,. MYERS. 



Tli 
ui clai 



while his profits are sufficient b 
manual labor of farming. 



iiintain count 


:y, but 


none of then 


n, the home 


of (he 


- 


- a careful at 


id stucli 


ous man, who 


his brains ra 


(her ih; 


• his muscle, 


rmeiit and he 
n to obtain 


eping 11 


f his farm, 
i' help in the 



William B. Myers was horn in Fountain county, Indiana, ti 

1S60. the son of Franklin and Sarah (Si ;er 1 . [yers. His I ttl ei 
an early day with his father, Jacob Myers, from North Carolina, their native 
to Fountain county, and here look land from the goi eminent, where they 
spent the remainder of their lives in farming". Franklin Myers lived in Jack- 
son township, one mile east of his son William's present farm. He became a 
large landowner and one of the most prosperous farmers of the community. 
He died in 1896, his wife in 1875. They were the parents of seven children, 
namely: Mariah, the wife of Henry Clore, of Parke county; Noah K.. a 
farmer of this township (see his sketch elsewhere in this work) ; Katie, the 
wife of Butler Myers, a farmer of this township; George, who died in Mont- 
gomery county; William B. ; Albert, of this county, now deceased; and Wilson 
of this county, also deceased. 

In 1884, after serving his apprenticeship on the home farm. William B. 
Myers was married to Emma Litsey, the daughter of Ulysses and Julia 
(Dooley) Litsey. Her father was a native of Kentucky, her mother of Parke 
county. Her father came to Indiana when young, farmed in this county, 



424 FOl ' rAIN WD WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

and later moved to Marshal!, where he carried on truck farming, and there 
he and his wife remained till their health failed, when the) made their home 
with William B. Myers until her death. Mr, Myers has two children, I I 
who married rhomas Crimes, ; md Leslie, at home. 

Mr. Myers' farm cot I .. tid ninety-six acre.-, on 

he carries oh general mixed farming. He raises Polan >gs and 

Shorthorn cattle. Nearly all the farm is tillable. Sevent) acre are in tim- 
ber and some of the trees are giants of the kind whii : days, 
while the timber furnishes a sugar camp which is a source of profit to its 
owner. Nearly all the improvements on the farm have been made by Mr. 
Myers, He has good fences and excellent hams, while on his present barn. 
built in 1903, appears the name of the farm. "Germany View Farm." and 
also that of its owner. The farm is extremely well k pt and all the wot 
clone by hired help. Mr. Myers keeps fifty head of cattle, twenty horses, 
about two hundred and fifty hogs, and keeps one hundred acres in corn, one 
hundred in wheat and oals, and one hundred in clovei and pasture. He farms 
on substantially the same scale as his father before him, and in approximately 
the same manner, except that he is quick to adopt all modern laborsaving ma- 
chinery, which was not invented in his father'.- more active days. Mr Myers 
stands high in the esteem and respect of his neighbors, and is one of th< most 
influential men of the community. 

Mr. Myers is a member of the Evangelical Lutheran church. In politics 
he has been a lifelong Democrat and has held the offici ssioner 

from 1897 to igoo. and other township offices, lie is also a member of th< 
Wallace Horsethief Detective Association. 



E. M. COX. 



This representative farmer and enterprising citizen is one of Fountain 
county's native sons and a descendant of an old and respected family that 
migrated to Indiana in pioneer times and settled originally in Parke county. 
Allen Cox, the subject's grandfather, a North Carolinian by birth, moved to 
Indiana many years ago and in addition to entering government lands in the 
above county, purchased other tracts from settlers in the vicinity and in time 
became one of the well-to-do men of his section of the country, lie died where 
he originally located, leaving several descendants, among whom was a son, 
Atlas Cox, whose birth occurred in North Carolina in 1^25, and who accom- 
panied the family to Parke county when quite young. 



]!', e 




, \\ 


hose 




Swr 


tin .;, d li 








Sntt 
tain 


county ; 


c 


el'esti; 




this 

in t 


review,' 1 

tie late ( ' 
1 Indian; 




1 wai 





FOUNTAIN AN] 425 

Atlas Cox was a farmer, a dealer in real estate, 
all-around handy man with almost any kin 
year- a on his place, the first < 

Fountain county, and from it the settlei for a numher of mile in - .• 
direction obtained the tree- with which their orchards were planted. 
Hockett, who became the >x, was also of Xorth Cai 

birth and was born the same year as her husband. 1 

follows : Rebec ried William 

Laura (deceased) was the wife of Walter 

p, Foun- 

ised, Erasmus 

v served a =hort time 

he spring Company K. Forty- 

ilitary career v. a- cut short the fi 11 

: i ed a i 

in the districl scl te spent hi :arg amid, the active duties of the 

farm. . parents until attaining his majority and then began life 

uponil ponsibilit) as a tiller pf the soil. To thi hon rable ocation 

he has ging success, own a\ 

present time a finelj I and sixty acres, where he 

carries rjn g neral agriculti . lines lie has 

long enjoyed much more than local reputation. In the matter of live stock 
hr makes a specialty of Duroc hogs, which he raises quite extensively for the 
market-, and tine graded cattle, for which there is always a greater demand 
than he can supply. In his political affiliation he is an ardent supporter of the 
principles and policies of the Republican party, and his religious faith is 
evidenced by a consistent membership in the Methodist Episcopal church, with 
which communion he has been identified for a number of years. 

Mr. Cox was married September 19, 1884. to Mary Tomlinson, whose 
parents, William and Martha Jane (Pike) Tomlinson, moved to Indiana in 
an early day and settled in Parke county, where the father's death occurred in 
1905 : the mother, who is still living, has reached a ripe old age. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Cox seven children have been born, namely: Ethel; Ancel, wife of Leo 
Yerkes; Byron, a farmer of Mill Creek township, whose wife was formerly 
Mary Marshall; Ella married Roy Eberly and lives in that township also; 
Arhot; Eston and Wayne, who are still under parental roof. Mrs. Cox is 
the third of a family of eight children, the names of her brothers and sisters 
being as follows: Allen; Charles (deceased) ; Louisa (deceased) ; John (de- 
ceased) ; Mrs. Sarah Grimes; Henry, and Lizzie, wife of John Meyers. 



426 FOUNTAIN AND WARUEN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

In closing this brief review of a ery active and li er, suffice 

it to say that Mr. Cox has always been actively 
advancement of his township and county, an a 

man is due the credit of the p ;enl excellenl jrsti 11 ... el roads which 
n<>\\ penetrate t< nearly every part of Mill ( reek and adjoining jti 
He was a leader in inaugurating these much-needed improvements, an 
before work began he can i > house, solicit 

from his fellow citizens and later contributed . 

the pushing forward and completing H.e is truly , 

pirited, believing in progress and n ement and his inftuen i ha 



A. B. IeHAVEN. 



The great task of clearing the land of its 
be realized by the people of today. Not a crop I be sown nor an orchard 

tree planted until the large rees had been cut down and removed with fire or 
with a te m "h rses or oxen. Even then the stumps wen trance 

and it is doubtful if so much as half a crop coul 
[lulled out or burned up. The amount of har< 

timber seems almost incredible. It was :<] never to end, and 

all members of the family were requii I I la , and at all 

seasons of the year. The family represented In the worthy subject of this 
sketch passed through all these and many kindred experiences in this locality 
in the earl) day.-, for the DeHavens braved the wilds of Fountain county 
when it was sparsely settled and literally hewed out their home from the dense 
woods, developing a fine farm from the virgin soil. They were people of 
thrift and close application and never permitted obstacles to thwart them or 
hardships to appall them. They became our best citizens, for while laboring 
for their own advancement they never neglected their duties to their neigh- 
bors and to the material, civic and moral upbuilding of the county. One of 
the best known members of this worthy family of the present generation is 
A. B. Deliaven, who, for a long stret h of years, was one of Fountain county's 
most progressive agriculturists and who is now living in retirement in the 
town of Covington. 

Mr. Deliaven was born in the place where he now resides on January 6, 
1843. H e ' s the son of Jacob and Susan (Osborn) Del lax en. both parents 
natives of Scott county, Kentucky, the father born on December i_\ 1808, 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COI v'TlES, INDIANA .[27 

and the mother's birth occurred on January 8, 1810, each representing splendid 
old families of the Blue Grass state. There they grew tip and won- educated 
in the old-fashioned school. They n "■ id from the "dark and b.ood} 
ground" country in 18.27, coming inn were married 

here and located in the woods in Troj township, where tin cabin 

and started life in true pioneer fashion. I hey worked hard and persevered and. 
in due coui se of time had a valuable farm and a good home in which tin., 
die resl of their lives. Twelve hildreri were born to them seven of whom are 

is a I '■ ' ■ it and was an influent iai man in the 
n n ■■ DeHavens are adherents of the New School Baptist church. 

A, B. ' la eri r to man! i .: • In n farm and there he 
hard in assisting in bringing the place up to an efficient state of developn ent. 
He rec ived such educational training as the on if those days 

afforded, ': early in life he took Up farming for . livelihood and this has 
been his main vocation. He started with nothing, but by hard work and care- 
ful management he prosp r d am tli r of >ne of the valuable 
farms.of this county, consisting i two hui ti'.lable 
land and forty acres of timber. He ! ed this J under high grade im- 
provements and managed the same so skillfully that it has retained its original 
fertility and stren: h oi ;oil. There h( carried on gei "al i rig and stock 
raising until igo8, I i In purchased a 
: t. tndi; n to si i there- 
after, and here he has since lived retired from the active duties of life. I I ■ ,- 

work and honest dealings with ins fellow men. 

Mr. DeHaven was married On December i -, 1868, to Margaret Osborn, 
daughter of William and Elizabeth (Dicken) Osborn. They were also early 
settlers in Indiana, Mr. Osborn having came to this state when a young man 
from Kentucky, and here he established a good home and was a highly re- 
spected citizen. 

Four children have been horn to Mr. and Mrs. DeHaven, namely: Ida 
is the eldest ; Ross has remained on the homestead, which he is ably operating; 
Alva, who was next in order of birth; and Arista, who is a member of the 
baseball team of Dayton, Ohio, this being his fifth year. 

Politically. Mr. DeHaven is a Democrat, but he has never been very 
active in public affairs and has never aspired to any political office. In religious 
matters he belongs to the Baptist church, in which he is a deacon and an active 
worker. Fraternally, he belongs to the Masonic order at Covington, and he 
stands high in all the circles in which he has chosen to move, being a man of 
genial personality and exemplary habits. 



428 FOUNTAIN AND WARKKN - 

WORTH R] 

pfcuously idenl 
with the educational life of this s> Worth Reed, the present 

cashier of the Citizens Ba ill be best reniemb 

work as a teacher, although his career in th< b bid: fair to be 

equally i He has won for himself an h in the 

world' 1 - affairs and is a distinctive type of the succei le nun:. Not 

a pretentious 01 exal ed life has been 1 to itsell 

and to which the biog i] I :rl with feeling and satisfac- 

tion, He is a worth}- representative 

who braved the wilds of the early days and endured the hardship ii [< i ~ : 
such a life in pushing farther west the frontier of > of 

his family having been well known h< 

county, for the general development of which tl [r. 

Reed is known to be a man who is liberal in his vv 
opinions of other.. He is easih the peer of any of his con! ti] i 

tellig . ikes pains to keep him 

Formed upon current events He ; - quiel in dei lean 

of deeds rather than words. He is essentially 

he has large faith in humanity and is opti n tic in all of his ■ 

Worth Reed was born in Fountain county, Indiana ;. 1853. 

and is the son of Stephen and Sarah A. (Finley) Reed. Stephen Reed was 
horn in Loudoun county, Virginia, December 10. : 
curred during the administration of the first President of the United S 
and he was always a great admirer of Washington. His grandfather, James 
Reed, served his country in the Revolutionary war, and Stephen [\ccd him- 
self was a soldier in the war of 181 2, in which he rendered very faithful 
service. He left Virginia for the then sparsely settled middle West, floating 
down the Ohio river in a flat-boat to Kentucky, where he lived until 1826, 
when, with true pioneer spirit, he pushed on westward and established his 
permanent home in Fountain county, Indiana, thus being among the earliest 
settlers here. He found here a wilderness where the ring of the woodsman's 
axe had not been very frequently heard and where roamed at will various 
kindreds of the wild and where sometimes passed the nomad tribes of red 
men. But the elder Reed was a brave, and courageous man, 
and cared not for the hardships and privations; being impressed with 
the fair valley of the Wabash and, having the sagacity to see a great future 



FOUNTAIN AND VVARREJN COUNTIES, IN] 429 

for the same, he went to work with, a will, ... [farm, 

established a comfortable ionic and here spent the rest of his lii 
Jul} , 1866, at the age of seventj ed his life to | i 

farming, lie was a hard-working, honest, hospil ble. ich as 

Ibe r< upon in the 1] il ' ling. 

atephe rn of his union 
with Sarah . ■...,] wife, of winch number Worth Reed, of 
this sketch* was fifth in order of birth. A son by the first marriage, Sampson 
Reed. I n bu I thi cou iS t: Wished 
the prese Citiz- 1 trdy & 
Reed, • . ik tich firm nam. ten Mr. Hardy and 
Mr. Reed dissolved partnership, Sampson K 1 holders 
and changing the name to the Citizens Bank, by whi known, and 
vyhich he continued to >ui c< tsfi lb ■ pi rati until his d< ath . ; 
u [n ' .1 canital stock of twem 



Worth Reed grew 



Purdue JJniyer it) at Lafayette, India d record for 

scholarship, completing the course leadii degree of Bachelor of 

Science, which was conferred on li 

After U tying ... Reed traveled for a period of three and 

one-hall' year- in th« East; representing a book-publishing company, giving 
the same eminent satisfaction in every respect and greatly increasing its pres- 
tige wherever lie went. Having long entertained a laudable ambition to 
become a teacher, he quit the road and took up school work, in which lie was 
most successful from the first, and in a few years he took rank among the 
leading educators of the state. Although his services were in much demand. 
he remained as principal of the Linnwood school in the city of Lafayette. 
Indiana, for a period of twenty-four years. His long retention here is cer- 
tainly criterion enough of his satisfaction as a teacher and of his popularity 
among the pupils and patrons of the school, which he managed in a manner 
that caused it to rank with the best of iis grade in the state. He kept fully 
abreast of the times in all that pertained to his work and ever improved the 



43° 

work tinder Ii h i i . i i e ideas, 

i ih.if he was ertainer and a 

winning at on good i\ ill and resp ,: I therel 

the besl results possible. He was for many years a well known fig 
various meet ■ He took mm 

institutes and ' hautauqtia .■ i irk, and now that In i ith From the 

rani H missed from edncatii <r\ 

pn nnini nl and highl} egarded. 

the death of Sampson Reed, mention I 
appointed by the tin ee e: ecul >rs to fill the po the ' 

Hank oi * ovington, made /acanl b\ the death of the subject's half-brother, 
and lie is at ibis wi discharging the duties of this position, 

eminent satisfaction to all concerned. 

On June ij, [893, ; united in man . Shoup, 

of Battleground, Tippecanoe count}, [n education 

is a daughtc r of Danii aMar) Shi >up, the 

French descent, hei South Caro- 

lina when young an 
born to the subject and wife, Dori 

Mr. Reed h alu 13 
part}', but he lias never sought the eruolun ha ter 

member of the Delta Delta Chap iigma Chi fraternitj 

1 niversity, and he ; " ! mgs to Tippecanoe Lodge Mo. 492 
Lafayette. Religious!}', he is identified with the Pn lurch. 

Unlike many men who have made teaching their life work. Mr. !' 
never become narrow, but has manifested an interest in the general affairs of 
the world, and is an excellent conversationalist on any topic of current inter- 
est, broad-minded, observant and keenly alert, a man whom to know is to 
accord the highest respect owing to bis many estimable characteristics. 



WILMER NAVE FOSTER. 

Among the worthy citizens of Fountain county is Wilmer Nave Foster, 
who commands the respect of friends and neighbors by an honorable, upright 
life and whose interest in the vocation of agriculture has brought him to the 
front as one of the leading farmers and stuck raisers of the township in which 
he lives. He is a native and life-long resident of Fountain county, having 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTJ l-:S, INDIANA. 4,^1 

been boi n in Sha i i8tli da; of Vugust, i B; 6, the 

George Ai l r < i ter, a pi i miinenl b 

be found in these country i irl_\ life was spenl 

in tlie fi< Ids during the sun i n 1 

ited bj 
atteri' 

tudii . ng his 

; tctical e cperience 

e to familial ize h If with agricultural s< 
strong, tvell ' ; - /eloped yi li , man, eminentl) able to pro 
the honorable vocation he had ch life work. 

; his attention to the 
1 th< ;oil and : is success has been uch as to place him in th 

Lhe o itinl j fn additii m i 
cultun , he is 

[ly in the matl - 

in • ! few, if 

in ihc state ! ter is an excell : tock 

h influence 
e their 

a ben< factoi lis conn tnitj nd ti ••• i hip. As a 

farmer, he beli 

tematii hods < el 

contrary, his well directed labors have invariably bee bj large and 

liberal returns. By reducing the most acceptable theories to pi 
done much to elevate the standard of husbandry in his community, and his 
example is being widely imitated by many of his fellow citizens, not only in 
his own, but in other 'localities as well. His farm of three hundred sixty- 
three acres in Shawnee township is all under cultivation, the buildings and 
other improvements thereon being among the best in the county and he is 
certainly well situated to enjoy the many material blessings which have come 
to him as a result of his judicious ! ibors, rare foresight and efficient manage- 
ment. 

Mr. Foster is an advocate of whatever tend-, to improve the materia' and 
moral condition of his neighborhood and his influence is generously exerted 
in behalf of all enterprises with these ends in view, lie manifests a lively 
interest in political affair-;, wields a strong influence for the Republican party, 
and at one time was a candidate for the Legislature, but, with the rest of his 



432 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, [NDIANA. 

affered defeat by reason of the ov-i the opposi- 

tion. He is a m No. 143, Benevolei and I 

in which org; an active wo in uphold 

iug its principles. 

I •'<; S ;' ! *' iber 20, 1897, Mr. Foster wa: united ii 1 1 ith Artie 

Meeker, daughter of Jacob and Janie (Dice) Meeker, the issue of whicb 
union h - been four child en, namelj :• F) 
and ( 'hades Frederick. 



■ 



■ tiong me sterling sons 01 fountain county, »vho have attaint ' to <i 

- in their home community is the gentleman whose 

name appi "ofacknowl ability, 

orney i manner 
that has won tlie m 

Claude B Philpoti 

father was born D< 

all ins life, his death 00 

a comrrion-schi 'I educati m :."- ; n hi§ chant 

He |s sun ived by his widow, who mal 1 Hiey \ ere 

the parents of one child, rh ibjcct ■ iternal 

grandfather, James I hilp tl v 1 ; ' Mill creek township, di d 

Claude B. Philpott secured his preliminary education in the public 
schools. He supplemented this by attendance at Quaker Seminar}-, in How- 
. this state, graduating with the class of 1899 and then, having 
: : 6ti the legal profession for his life work, he entered the law depart- 
ment oi the Indiana University. [n 190S Mr. Philpott began the practice 
of lav. in Kingman. Subsequently he moved to Covington, where he has since 
been prominently identified with legai affairs, having his share of the business 
in that line: His abilities were quickly recognized and in November, min, 
he was elected to the office of prosecuting attorney, being the present incum- 
bent of that office. A man of pleasing presence and forceful personality, 
Mr. Philpott has on man)- occasions demonstrated his power before court and 
jury, and in the argument of a ease he is characterized by a courtesy that is 



i • .i . UNTIES, J 

itcd by bench anil bai . I le has successfully 
cases, al\\ i an att< >rnej , 

,.v 23, ryo 1 0] ha L. Sowei 

ivas born on August 31, 18S0, the d VV. and Martha 

; Mill < reek t< 1 Irs. Philpott 

and re; Politi Mr. Philpott is a Democra 

in the sn church rclatioi i 

church. A man of |uaint- 

: in number. 



SAMU] 

il pursuits who 

tn is filled with men 

he East who h; rnment 

- 13 bject of this 

1 

.Indiana ned, for he believes thai h< 

ins and prairii 

■■ 
untain county's poor i ' • ■ 

uglas county, 

is, December 7, 1865. He i m and Eiizabeth (Myers) 

father born in Fountain county, Indiana, in 1838, and here he 

the major part of his earlier years, moying to Douglas count}-. Kansas. 

in [865 and there he lived until his death, on November 4, 1871, having always 

farmed for a livelihood. His family consisted of five children, two of whom 

are living. They were named as follows: Sue married Isaac Harbert, a 

fanner; Rista Alfred is deceased; Methias Fii is deceased; Samuel II. of this 

review: Mina is living in Kansas. 

Samuel H. Sowers received his education in the common schools, and 
when a boy he left Kansas and came to Fountain county, Indiana, he and his 
sister making their home with their maternal grandfather, Eli Myers, who was 
one of the early pioneers of this locality, having settled in the woods here in 
[827 and by hard work carved out a good home and here he became a well 
known citizen in the early days of the county's development. 
(-'3) 



434 FOUNTAJ VN11 M.-ia.X « . DIANA. 

iuel H. ' ' 

widow oi Wil F. M; Miriam A. Grimes: she was 

born and reared in Indiana. 

el) : Leo R., 
parents ; Fern, deceased, am 

.Mr. Sowers took charge oi the county farm in Septenib 
he lias conducted the .same with gratifying results and ii 
refleel i limself and b > the emin< til sati 

cerned. The farm contains two hundred and ■ -fivi ici 

has kept well improved and undei a high sta 
annual yields of varied crops have beei I that Mr. Sowers is 

an up-to date and can il gi n :ral n er. lie rotates his 
lates the soil so that il ha ts original U tilil 

strengthened and; made i» He carries on general 

and, ace irding to the cons 

incumbents of the. po >nnt) farm thai the peo- 

ple have ever 1 
The average is from thirl 
thin^ is operated und 
repair ai comf 

Mr. Sowers i 'olitically , 

. Uvfi; Seen loyal in his support if the party. 



rNIS RUSK 

A member of one of the honored families of Fountain county. Indiana, 
the name Rusk has been associated with the history of this section of the 
state for a period of ninety years, the paternal grandather of the subject hav- 
ing braved the wilds of Cain township as early as 1822 and be was thus one 
of the earliest pioneers and from that day to this members of this family 
have played no inconspicuous part in the history of the county. The) have 
been known as especially public spirited, contributing in any way possible to 
the general upbuilding of the same, and the) have been esteemed for their 
honesty and neighborly inclination.-, always being willing to assist others on 
the highway of life, believing in the old adage that "no man bveth to himself 
alone." It is such worthy families as the Rusks that have builded this line 
section of the old Hoosier state to what it is today, one of the choice localities 



I ni ■ I \l>, \\|, \\ .\ I - ':i COI [NDJ VNA. 

of the Middle West, and to ihem and othei oJ a lil t type wc owe a debt of 
gratitude \\ hicli cannot be paid. 

Di lis Rusl .:■..-' 

r 7. 1830, an grew to m m- 

d on the ho 

being still 
l success fi ' 1 nan. ] 

hool house 1 unit 

It was nol unl il 185 r that he ca 1, 

; ' 
ion oJ D,i\ id, Jr., and Martha l Bali I Rusk 1 es own an I Han 

counti< I h '. r< pectively. In thai state th to maturity, were edu- 

md married, and to 1! ■ n the E rn: Abigail 

ceased; Den;:; Squire lives in Montgomery 

county: Robei d ■' in ■' i n William Biddle, of Waynel 

: Rusk, Sr., lite subject'' grandfather, a nati < of Scotland, came 
Cai ishi . ■ ■ 1 le hundred and 

sixty acres of lam 

1 , built a log cabin cleared a 
his famil) , w hi - came in tl lent 1 

' was established. 1 h by tl 

sketch. 

The father of the sul ct was a Dem ; cally, and in 1 

in itters he was a member of the Baptist church. 

Dennis Rusk was married on October 9, 1S51. to Paradis< 
daughter of David and Betsy Maxwell. I ler death occurred in 1851, and Mr. 
Rusk was subsequently married to Margaret I 7 .. Hall, daughter of Elijah Hall, 
a native of Virginia, who eventually came to Fountain county, Indiana, and 
established the famil)- home. Mr. Rusk's last wife passed away on April _>/, 
1895- 

'Jdie subject's family consisted of ten children, seven of whom are living 
at this writing, namely: Millard, of Cain township; Delilah was next in 
order of birth; David lives in .Montgomery county: Mary, who married 
George Parker, of Cain township; Elva married W. S. Fowler, of Montgom- 
ery count)-; Albert lives in Cain township: Burton is a hardware dealer at 
Attica, this county. 

Politically. Dennis Rusk is a Democrat, and he belongs to the United 
Brethren church. He has been township assessor. He is the owner of three 



436 ' ■ NMANA. 

■ ' 

on it stand m ideno 

■ ■ - 



AMUEL WARRICK 



The \ 

- 
life ha not I • with satis 

i as he r< call 
and the victories won in 1 pendent position which 

his But tl i r - ■ 

and ex< characl 

i dy and inde- 
li is of i itizenj of 
[ e beg 

Mr. V\ I -. [837. H< is 

. an (Jen 

[842, 
md there the farming the rest of their li . e 

Samuel Warrick was five years old when he accompanied his parents 
from Ohio to Indiana, and lie grew to manhood on the old home place in Han- 
cock ci unity, assisting his father with the general work about the place during 
crop seasons when he beame of proper age. and during the winter months he 
attended the common schools in his district. 

When a young man he learned the carpenter's trade, at which he became 
very skillful in due time, and he has made carpentering and farming his life 
work. Pushing on wesl aid he canx- to Fountain county in 1854 and located 
in VanBuren township, the land being poorly developed and the settlers fev, 
lie remained there until 1863, when lie came to Troy township and piircha etl 
forty acres and here he established his permanent home, and. having worked 
hard and managed well, he has added to his original holdings from time lo 
time until he now owns one of the choice farms of the township, consisting 



F0\ l\\l I II V \KK1 < HANA. ;,;,' 

of two hundred 

i i, all ol ihich i undei 
which is still limber H general farmi 

and he ha i good duelling and 

Mr. Warricl 

I 
i. i « . ■ ■ 

children ha\ t to the subjei 

Ambi ise, 
F. A. ' ' T., who was the tv 

.1 ; and An ohn K. Oden. 

Republican and he 

isor oi Troy township, v- h 
the satisfaction of all concerned. He is a faithful member of the Met! 
Episcopal ch 11 



WILLIAM R \iA 

It cannoi !je othei tliar inl ■■■■ tinj 

in this work the v in ing i ■ 
; : 01 tlined, and tl 

' light on to tl ility and to 1 

ea< | ■ « areer. Kadi man whi i st 

his part in connection with human life and human activil 
recognition whatever may be his field of endeavor, and it is the functi< 
works of this nature to perpetuate for future 

concerning those represented in its pages, and the value of such publications 
is certain to be cumulative for all time to come, showing forth the individual 
and specific accomplishments of which generic history is ever engendered. 
One of the worthy native sons of the locality of which this volume deals is 
W. R, Massey, who has spent practically his entire life here, engaged in vari- 
ous pursuits, and he is therefore well and favorably known throughout this 
section of the state, and he is a creditable representative of one of our best 
old families, members of which have played well their parts in the general 
development of the community and set such high examples of citizenship as to 
entitle them to the respectful consideration of all who have known them. 

W. R. Massey, who is now engaged in the real estate and insurance busi- 
ness in Covington, was born in Fountain county. Indiana. December 24. [862. 



438 FOUN t'AJ S ANU WAM 

; . I tnd Martha J - . the fall i 

m which stal he came to India 
in early ' ' oy when he accoit 

ain county ; they were a 

tural pursuits and. he was known 

nd fathei of the 
W . R.. ne farm when 

he assisted with the gen< . n he became oi proper age, and d 

r months he attended the.i non scl food pra 

tical ei riculturi 

l.oi iim years, then I 
his attention to merchandising, tl 
month 

I estate; and fire in 
e same ne he ser 

I Fountain .count 

' - y acceptably fo 

of that township for a peril d of fou 
to all c< n< erned. In the meai tittle he - lucrative ] 

returned 1 urn, remain 

ngton, ' after sj : oi Loui - na 

He is '■■ i i I est md fire in 

aw office on the south side oi iousi quare. 

Mr. Massey was married in [885 to Mary Vaughan if Frank- 

lin and Frances (Webb) Vaughan. Her father was a native of Virj 
from which state he came to Indiana in an early day and here, through indus- 
try, established a good home in which he spent the rest of his life. 

Five children have been horn to the subject and wife, named as follows: 
Leland, who has remained a member of the home circle; Charles E., who mar- 
ried Ina McDaniel, lives in Covington and is in partnership with his father in 
the real estate and fire insurance business; John Q. married Hazel Cox, and 
he is proprietor of a barber -lum al Mellott, this county; two died in infancy. 

W. R. Massey belongs to the Masonic order and the Knights of Pythias, 
also the Modern Woodmen of America, all at Kingman. Indiana, and in 
religious matters he belongs to the Christian church, lie is a self-made man 
and i\ therefore deserving of a great deal of credit for what he has accom- 
plished in the face of obstacles. 



, . ■ . i D iKRI 

ie of the oldest a • 

U 

if the to 

legree th< ; . • ■ 

... ell, sun ol 

i . 
1821, eat y learned to Fountain 1 1 

and 1 ti, where he folio 

3, he" lived a retired life. 
■ 
making her home at this 

durin of tliat part of the 

iosI rtany the firsl mem- 

bi own. He was a 1 

\ ide ii advaiv 

■ 
bell 1 ■ t: . J 

name ii 

• i 
Herbert 1 Fountain 

[S53, i is ed 1 in the publi 

[e beg; 
calling, acce] lerkship in 

held for a period of two years. Fortified with a practical knowiedge oi 
ness, lie embarked in the mercantile trade for himself in 1877, and has con- 
tinued the same with marked success from that time to the present, a period 
of more than thirty-five consecutive years, during which he lias advanced from 
the one little room in which he began in a very modest way until he new oc- 
cupies three commodious apartments and carries one of the largest and best 
stocks ol" general merchandise in the county. His business has grown with 
each succeeding year and today lie is not only the oldest merchant in New - 
town, and among the oldest in Fountain county, hut also one of the most suc- 
cessful, as his extensive patronage and solid financial standing abundanlh 
indicate. 

Mr. Campbell, on January 5, 1881, was united in marriage with Anna 



• ivcly, 1 being 

...... I ' form 

if New ^ 
..,! : ie Ru . Lb ad in ordei ■ i ' : - tli 

r X ■ < ; Adams, Massaclu 
i the stot VIr. Campbi U I 

ir expense 
best ad vanta Uter a 

school " 

ung ladies at 
finishing the prescribed course, 
which noted i ■ was gradual 

Wabasl : 

record i a student. 1 i 

. 

Mr. Can 

church, j.p(\ ; :i y ! ; ti L - he ! 

antile bus 
proved of 

i- im which h :vei r recei 1 liber; return 



S UIUFJL ! DE. 

1 he best title one can e.-.tal 
intelligent community is a protrai n >rable residence therein. The 

late Samuel Cade was a lifelong resi nl and by his 

genealogy represented two old and well i n imilies. He was a man of 

well defined purpose and never failed to carry to successful completion any 
work or enterprise to which he addressed himself. He established a reputa- 
tion for industry, honesty, prudence and foresight such as few men attained. 
He always possessed energy, resolution, determination and in early life acted 
according to the motto, "I will find a way or make one." His good common 
sense, caution, resolution and accurate powers of observation, together with 
the traits above named and others of equal importance, enabled him to over- 
come every obstacle and establish a career highly successful in all of its parts. 



' 



Lie hi r>l the mi >st e ■ lensi ■. 

one of tin 

il. He accum 

n in the 
I I 

26. lie 
ide. on 
... long o\ i rland jourm y 
. itain count} , Indiana, a • 1 
.1 

1 . lent to a life on the frontiei 

. - . 

nted \vi k in hi leveloj 

boy, and he recei te old-fashioned si 



n an t. He 

l>ai ns and outhti [ding ■ ■ 

de, sending to the markets annually greal numbers 

and no small part of his large competent was secured in 

this w '-'50. id Mary i . Conover, 

._>. One son, William Thomas, was born to them. 

He died Novenibei Vlr. Cade was married on January 4, 1854. to 

Eliza J. Clark, who was horn on August 29, 1835, in Clinton county. Indiana, 

being the daughter of David C. and Mary (Slipher) Clark. Her father was 

born and reared in Frankfort, Germany, from which place he emigrated to 

America when a yOung man. Grandmother Flenner was also born in Gei 

many. The grandfather was educated in his native land and was a good 

German scholar. The following children were born to David C. Clark and 

wife, namely: Augustus Ficart, deceased; Stephen, who lives at Frankfort, 

Clinton county, this state; Isaac N. is a Baptist minister and lives in K 



442 

City; Jonas 

Davi I arc all thi asecl; 

dren tt'i 

I li 
in v*e ied Frank Hurst, 

.:■ prog 3 of local affa 
; ' tie publii 

bi - i 

I irital 

I 



■ ■■■■■ idry. J 

fann i; 

I -reli tnce which ch ira ih< > 

._. than i(> be reared in close touch with nature in ihe healthful, life- 
inspiring labor of the fields. It has always been the 
have sprung the moral bone and sinew of the country, and the maji ri 
our nation's great warriors, wise statesmen, renowned scholars and d 
giiished men of letters were horn on the farm and are indebted to its earl}' 
influences for the distinction which they have attained. Among the -; ! 
tial tillers of the soil in Fountain county. Indians, is the enterprising gentle- 
man under the caption of whose name this article is written, he having sprung 
from a race of sturdy and painstaking husbandmen. 

G. 1)- Snoddy, of Wabash township, was born in Fountain county, on 
January u, 1874, and he is the son of Samuel i. and Susan ( Koons) Snoddy, 
one of our most prominent ea ion of whom is found on an- 

other page of this work, in die personal sketch of M. \Y. Snoddy. 



FOUN I COUNTIES, J 

G. D. Sin >ddy was r 

ation in I 

I 

n, in 1899. I Le lias 
l 
the 

Around hi - 
hung about the 
tudi i riti farm consists 

»vhich two hun 1 - the balance 

,; the 
j well' in I !(.- carries on : 

- 

al i t }', al 
progrcs ud taking care 

is plai 

1 

D 

i'al i 

Th< uti 

I he is interested in the 

n who supports all measures looking to the 

. he lias never sought political offices. Fra- 

Uy, he i- a member or" the Knights of Pythias, of Wabash township, and 

belongs to the Improved Order of Red Men at Covington. 



S. L. WILKINS. 



This is an age in which the farmer stands pre-eminentl) above any other 
class as a producer of wealth. He simply takes advantage of the winds, the 
warm air, the bright sunshine, the refreshing rains, and by nature's help md 
by virtue of his own skill in handling nature's gifts he creates grain, hay, 



I'M " .... 

i has cv 
i 

if three-cj i ie 

for ea learn the art o 

life vocatii u . he\ i ' 

r this line o id a 

1 01 ntry where h 

rhe air is pure, where, on 

■ he had 

life kVOI 

Mi. 1 . ulill Creel rish 

i 
ha 
■ . 

has b 
i 
[gemei i ye. ^ear 

the vali ; -four 

acreSj « it u] improvement and cultiva- 

: farming and stock raising. I !■ hai made all 
the suj>erb improve hat are seen today. He has lived here 

. nity lies in the fertile Wabash valley, and dur- 
ing his residence here of over three decades he has noted wonderful changes 
and has taken a very active part in the same. He has a pleasant residence and 
a good set of outbuildings. 

Mr. Wilkin-, was married in (88o to Clara Johnson, daughter of Levi 
and Jane (White) Johnson. Her father was born in this county and he de- 
voted his life to agricultural pursuits, his death occurring in 1870. The John- 
son family has been well and favorably known in this locality since the early 
days. The death of Airs. Wilkins' mother occurred in Wabash township, in 
189.T 

Two children have been born to Mr, and .Mrs. Wilkin-, namely: I t; I 



I 

Ian 'i 

■ ■■ i 

i 
1 

pf ti i Religiously. 

I 

•■ . 



: 

i 
Bin en town 

■ 

of the Fou 

■ 
N Ella, B< md Charles 
curred in 183-'. died in 1909. The mytl 
this life in the year 1910. 

Ed Greenley, who first saw the light of day on January 9, i. : 
reared on the h ime place in \'an Buren township and has spenl the greater pari 
of his life at or near the place of his birth, 1 le enjoyed such educational ad- 
vantages as the public schools afforded, later attended the normal school al 
Ladoga, grew up with a proper appreciation of the true dignit) of hone 
and began life for himself as a farmer, which honorable \ lie has since 

followed with more than 

Po jessing sound judgmenl and keen discernment in matters of business, 
realty from time to time until he is now one of the large 
land owner., of the county. To his homi plai of on hundred and 1 
.1. res in Van Buren township hi d pi rial attention, while a large 

farm of two hundred and sixty acre; in the township of Waba h, Ik rent . 
receiving therefrom no small part of his im 



44') ■ ■ 

I 

inter mo old capacity for some y 

1 
indii at le ii 

nection 

I b 
branch . 

In hi political beliei . I Jreei 

lad} of 
beauti ful with her husbain 

motion if their m lildren have 

mion, namely A\o married lin 

! 

hi une circle. 



R. V. : 

I he old settler. 

Roberl the i I • come to the wilds 

oi iv< ago and undertake the task of clearing 

m the dense woods. When he arrived the clearings 
in this Wabash country were few and far between and he found plenty lo do 
in subduing the heavy timber and brush wood that cumbered the soil and kept 
out the sunlight. Tie was a man of fearlessness and courage and permitted 
no obstacle to stand in Id's way. Fie found here a land of wild beast^ with 
now and then a nomad band of Indian-., with winding trails through the greal 
forests, but no roads; the streams had no bridges and his neighbors were re 
mote and scattered over a vast territory. But the family became well estab- 
lished here through perseverance, and the name Brewer has been well known 
in this locality since those early days, one of the best known of tl 
generation being R. V. Brewer, successful farmer of Wabash township, who 
is himself a link between the pioneer epoch and the present. \nd he re. alb, 



manj inl esl d ' 

rated hen 

1 

I 
the somi iv hat 

lefi 
years, then crossed tin 

and he 

i 
met and marri< 

surviving until 
R . V. B 

- 

i 

his good management. 

tion, all but a small pastun 

four acres, which he works himself, just to find a little something to employ 

a part of his time. He cleared his land and developed it. and built a line home 

and an excellent set of outbuildings. He is spending his declining years in 

the midst of comfort and quiet as a result of his former years of activity. 

Mr. Brewer was married in 1857 to Sarah Ella Cook, daughter of John 
D. and Rachael (Mood} ) Cook, and to this union five children have been 
born, namely: Delsina E. is deceased: Alva, Charles G. and Eniersi 
survive; the other daughter, Ottis Ann. is deceased. On November 4, 1888. 
the subject was married a second tunc, his last wife belli 
of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Kellum) Booe. Mi 
era part oi Indiana, and he came to Fountain i 

after his first marriage, and here he spent the rest of his life engaged in farm 
ingf. his death having occurred here. -Mrs. Ella Brewer was horn in Fountain 



I 

I . . 

clivt- in ... ie hv 

I 
I 



I 
ie v 

I 
listorians thai i 

i I 

I 

: family. Think oi 
old subscript! lev the brai 

... lc ' 

... 
i 

. 
years in honorable retirement in his ; .. Covingtoi 

amid just such conditions as we describe above, he having bei n the son of a 
typical frontiersman. The Randolph family braved the wilderness of the 
Wabash region when it was sparsely settled and when hardships and pri- 
vations were the rule and the conveniences of advanced civilization were the 
exception, but they were hardy and courage ed until they 

succeeded. 

Mr. Randolph was hum on what is known as Silver [sland, in tin 
ni of Fountain county, Indiana, September ri, 1836. lie is the on oi 
Aaron l\ and Charlotte (I linger) Randolph. Jiis father was born in Xew 
Jei <■. and from there he moved to Cincinnati, (dun. when young and re- 
mained in the inetn 1 >hio rivei two years, and then he came to 
Fountain county, Indiana, establishing his home in the southern part of the 



I 

re tl i 

i 

iid moved idence 

in vYashingl 

for what he 
g I until he be- 

lt" the county 
-: ■ am tain o 

.. 
r 
i 

[' ferti 

Mr. Ra 

ud E i 

Liltural 
a to Montgomery county, 
, and 1 i bote! in the early days, on the old turnpike between 

Craw fon • ' Fayette, and h al • opi a I [arm there on which 

he reared his family, becoming well established and well known. At his 
tavern, or in those days known principally as wayside im nany a 

traveler to the West and not a few men of distinction in statesmanship and 
other fields of endeavor. There the death of the mother of Mrs. Randolph 
or infed. Mr. Wright later moved to Iowa ami died there at the home of 
1 1 on. 

To Mr. and Mis. Randolph were born (lie following children: Lottie, 
who lives in Illinois, is the wife of J. C. Rile} ; William L. is deceased; Mor- 
ton is also deceased; Lula, who is living on the Indiana Mate line, married 
(29) 



rs; Stephen 

i 
Politically. Mr. ] 

i 
Lion of all le < tl rler, ai 



' HAAS. 



f l , - ie Haas fan 

ill 

I 
U ' f all wh' i ' i 

■ 

ily at New to 

fore i. and there he took up lai ar and 

twenty-five cents per acre, which he developed and on which he reared his fam- 
ily, and became a well known pioneer of the county, and here he spent the rest 
of his life engaged in farming, and on the old homestead Ins son, Allien I laas. 
was reared, and he, too, spent his life in agricultural pursuits. Late in 1 I'e lie 
moved to VVingate, Montgomery county, where lie and his wife reside at this 
wi iting. i i iii) \\\, of th 

,-a, who is living at home, she being the elder of the two. 
tiny \V. 1 laas was reared 
and he received a fairly good education in the < : He took up 

farming for a livelihood am! is now 

■-in of i me h 
under his able management, yields a handsomi pi ' 



I 

be Co- i>1 i . 

i 
i 

■ , ... 
■ 

■ 

I 

I 

: belongs to th 
... itueri 



n\ 

1 
I 
pears 

com about [778 ere wen f Mellon who 

ac :oi : command ; 01 

in Virginia and one in 01 : 

was married and reared a fami I daughters. John 

Mellott, one of these sons, grew to maturity and married a lady by the name 
of Eve Sipes, wh'o bore him the following children: Gideon, George, Jacob, 
Andy, John, William, James, Abram, Charlotte, Ida and Susan. So far as 
known, all the Mellotts in the United Stales are descendants or offspring of 
these three brothers. 

George Mellott, second son of the aline mentioned John, came tn Ran- 
dolph county, Indiana, in an earl) day and on March im, [84 ;. ma 
Barbara (Beary) Rupert, who was born March 31, 1816, in <]<;:< 
who with her parents moved to Randolph county, Indiana, in the year 1828. 



I 
fer I fried 

i 

I 
ii md 1 band died J [9.] 

■ 

1 
1 

: 
dts and owing 

,nJv a nieager edm u :1 :: : 

Ii ■ ; . . - iai nonth 

lifcsted a decided ta 
u 

/ . , 

r .1 

> th iteers and 

1 1 . 

ipoli: 

1 

and thi 

ton. At the expiration of his period ol enlistment in k 
discharge at Indianapolis and immediately thereafter returned home and re- 
sumed the peaceful pursuits of civil life, which he has still continued. 

Mr. Mellott ha: been twi married, the first time in [864 to Synria C. 
Tudor, who departed this I nth of May. 1910, and in June of the 

ensuing year he was united in the bonds of wedlock to Delia Parsons, his 
presenl wife. To the first marriage four children were born, namely: Ellen, 
who died at age of fourteen years; George died when eighteen mi 
Wil'iam, who married Ora Strader and now lives in Sullivan county, Indiana; 
d as trustee of Richland township For a period of six yeai 



I 

I 

the war Mr. M ■ 

a period of rl 

: I . . 

' | lu- 

ll 

i 

n an 

i 



to 

i. aders 
in their communities and are homebuilde'rs and law-abiding, for the] are, al- 
most without exception, thrifty and assimilate very readily our mode of gov- 
ernment, having themselves been reared under a republican form of govern- 
ment. So we have ever welcomed them, for they have here benefited alike 
themselves and us. Of this sterling citizenship the Ramser family of Foun- 
tain county is a worthy exponent, and of which one of th< n mem- 
bers of the presenl generation is Charle. c Ramser, a progressive farmer of 
Wabash I being of the sec >n ; g I Swiss in tlii 
his birth having occurred in Fountain county, Indiana, on September 18, iSUy. 
He is the son of fohn and Elizabeth (Ritz) Ramser. The fathe 



; 

;■ 
i 

ime on 

l 

h 

i 
i 

- 



■ . 

■••■ ii 

ish to hi] lich consis 

, 
iod i ad i .... 

i di d Pi n stock raising, making a, specialty of Poland-Chin; 
and graded hogs of other breeds, his fine .stock always finding a very read) 
market owing to their uperior quality. His place is very admirably located 
five miles south of ' '-o\ ington. 

Mr. Ramser was married on June g, [896, to Mary tola Snoddy, the 
daughter of William 1. and Liza Jane (Johnson) Snoddy, one of the well 
known old families of Fountain county, further mention of whom will be 
found elsewhere in this work. Mrs. Ramser grew to womanhood in her 
tive community and received her education in the common schools. The 
union of the subjeci and wife has been withoul issue. 



I 

Democra 

nd has never held I 

intin current 






ome, he 



occui d 
id he is the son 
! M. I " . . paver 

| 
county,.' In .... 

■ 
I thi ' 

' [e an I his v >ai : :n, of 

which number th< i living": Jonathan, Washington, Isaac, Kate 

l married a .'.: r. Ho\ ; married \\ illia m re), and the 

Rice was a Democrat in politics, but never aspired to public 
; to devote his attention to his personal affairs. He was a 
member of the lodge of Independent Order of Odd Fellows at .New- 
town. 

Samuel Rice was reared under the paternal roof and secured hi.' educa- 
tion in the common schools. He was reared to the life of a farmer and has 
never seen any good reason why he should forsake that vocation for any other. 
fn this he has shown good judgment, for as a farmer he has demons! 
ability of a high order, having maintained the farm at the same high standard 
set by his father before him. He is up-to-date in his methods and dues not 
hesitate to investigate new idea-, being progressive and advanced in his mal ■ 



COVNTIES, INDIANA. 

up 'i h far is well impro\ ed in e\ ei) i esp< cl and is mm 
he township. 
In r$7i Mr, Rice i 

n<] .' ■ 

ihio. I'n Mr. Rio 

! 

■ I i 

red and K< 
Mr. Rice married Alice 

i 
I 

..... 
presenl time a i ■ I flp^rf ■ 

Ifare of the commi n 
ber of the b< arc! of directo and 

men, he has easily m; 



There is no cla from the 

I 

mini tering of comforl 
fflictei th thai pan ol human existence may be lengthened and 

a great degree of - ijoyed during the remainder of their e; 

sojourn. There is no standard by which their beneficent influence can be 
measured j their helpfulness is limited only by the extent of their knowledge 
and skill, while their power goes hand in hand with the wondi i I 
nature that spring from the source of life itself. 

One of these worthy benefactors of mankind is Charles M. Cogj 
of the well known and successful general physicians of Fountain county, who 
for a number of years has maintained his home in the ni ngton. 

He was born in Knox county. Ohio. August 18, [853, aud is tin 
fonathan and Louise (Marquand) Coggins. The father, who was a native 
of Philadelphia, was a carpenter b) ti tdei which he Foil I 



0UNTA1 ■ ■ 

i 

a \ oung man lie c; 

■ 

■ ■ lie ad 

being a kind, 

■ 

l -.- 

later attending one con 

i 

with i 

■ 

earliesi ■ 

mill, 
lichis one of the b ' : 

,i ■ ■. : i lion in Fountain county. One 

who married Prof. Will- 
i N T ye; of Purdue University^ and her death occurred on September 
1 6, 1907. 

Politically, the Doctor is a Republican ami he is loyal to his party's prin- 
ciples, lie was elected a trustee of Wabash township in ro,o8. He belongs 
to the Fountain County Medical Society and holds membership with the 
Knights of Pythias at Snoddy's Mills. 

' to( tor Coggins has a fine modern home, facing the road and Cole creek, 
and he has been very successful in a financial way. lie owns a spl 
Ihirty-six-horse-powei Auburn automobile. Tie first came to Cole en 
Snoddy's Mills many years ago as physician for the Bunker Coal Company, a> 
mining was carried on much mure extensively hen 1 then than now. P 
sonally, he is a genial, obliging gentleman and is popular with all cli 



458 FOI rAIN AND WAK1 i 01 ' 

J. FRAXt 1 1 

['( irai 

nntain con 
1 

mc of hi 

:rtainly no other i 
impressed his 

terests of 1 hin the 

limits of this 

merits form no irn i 

besl he can : facts in 

, tribute to his wo 
busim 

general welfare of a peopl at hea 

J. Fr; 

\pr:' I : 

rs as hi of resitlei 

' ania, who in i ' ; -' h < 
state : 

beginning to a commandir pi < imong th< leading mercl] I town. 

From time to time he was obliged to increase the capacity of his store in order 
to keep pace with the demands of his customers and at his death, which 
occurred in the month of May, 1890, he was proprietor of the largest dry 
goods establishment in the city and had much more than a local reputation in 
business circles. Mary Hendricks, who became the wife of John \Y. McDer- 
mond, was also of Pennsylvania birth and a full cousin of the late Hon. 
Thomas A. Hendricks, formerly governor of Indiana, Vice-Presidenl of the 
United States and for many years among the nation's most eminent states- 
men. She lived to be fifty-nine years of age and departed this life in Attica. 
October, [890, five months after the death of her husband, who passed away 
in May, 1890. 

J. Frank McDermond spent his childhood and youth in his native town. 
received his educational training in the public schools of the same, and at an 



FOUNJ UN VND WARREJS COUNTIES, I DJ , '.. 459 

early age was taken into his father's store where b) practical 1 sperienee he 
soon acquired a knowledge of the basic principle. 1 of the mercantile trade. 
Perceiving in his son a natural adaptability For busii 
reasonable efforts in the lad wa uniliar 

early ever I I a capabl 

and obliging salesman. might have a liase of 

the business he was ] 
father to New \ 01 i 

vhich 1 
wholesal dealers ai I roved o great value to him in after <■ 

Drained h E lately succeei 

the business, young intl) in vie" a 

uuun to ever) other 1 nsideration. Bending 
tion of m; t< ring his . il tig and becoi ing more than an ord i 

merchanl lis adyai • rapid and while mere youth he Was 

able, with his father 

plan- 1 . ' Etei ■ i : 1 

of. thel hich under his 

: ad of the larg< 

; in Danville or 1 
md com ' nost exti erne merci ai 

I 
in re< sing ' i tit - he nanib ted not 1 ent if it- ever) 

tail, bul e ecutn ■ abilit) if a high ord :r. To me< ids oi 

the trade he has enlarged the capacity of his i I me to time erei ting 

new and improved buildings and adding many new features' in order to keep 
abreast of the times and in touch with the most advanced thoughts in all that 
pertains to the mercantile trade. Believing in the efficacy of advertising as 
a medium for extending his business, he has already expended something in 
excess of forty-two thousand dollars in this direction, the result of which has 
been the increase of his sales by more than one million dollars, besides giving 
him wide publicity and adding very materially to Attica's reputation as an 
important business center. Another means of increasing his patronage are 
the bargain days and reduction sales which he holds from time to time and 
which, being extensively advertised, are always largely attended not only b) 
the people of the city but by customers from the country and from other and 
distant points. 

Under the title of the Progressive Department Store, which is really 
ten stores in one, be carries a full stock of nearly everything required in 



46O FOUNTAIN A.ND OUNTI" INDM 

the mercantile hue. including dry goods, dn 
and linoleum, women's an< 

men's and boy's niture. 

, machines, cut a 

in atoi s and ma 
articles, the mention pi which would transcend thelin ;etch. 

intent on a Ivaneing his own interests in building up a ! 
li the pe< iple appreciate and « hii li 
to the community. Mr. McDermond has nol bp( 1 unmindful 
dutj ; ' erialpros erity I he ha 

tributi pi cial-y 

■ 



uiuiut • ii ■ , .a- uiih 11 iia\e jcsuue 1 

city's prosperity and welfare. NV>I h irections 

gb tlie medium ■ d the A" 
Association, an organization 
grOwth of Attica than any >thei agency. He servt ; of the 



into the State \- ■ the title of the Merc! 

was also " ; ) ; of the s an tlie Ltpbuil ing 

"t an additi n 
at i!< mn'nal prices so as to encoui ig I to the gn w tl 

vvel fan of the city. 

Mr. McDermond ha:, been importuned al different times to accept the 
office of mayor and councilman, but this as well as all other public honors 
he has persistently refused in the belief that he can accomplish more for the 
city as a private citizen than as an official. Not the least of his contributions 
to the material growth and beauty of Attica is the magnificent modern resi- 
dence which his family occupy, in addition to which he owns a cozy bungalow 
on the hank of the Waba h ten miles north of the city where he spends the 
summer months and entertains his many friends, including his Sunday school 
class and the various fraternal societies to which he belongs. During the 
heated seasons he motors to and from his place of business, spending the 
evening's and nights amid the cool breezes of one of the most attractive and 
ideal sylvan scenes to he found anywhere along the beautiful river on which 
his rural home is situated. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN C01 ITIES, J tDIANA. [6i 

Mr. -Mi Do niond is a firm ' ■ and 

of years has been a zealous n nil^er of the Met] idist ] 

the most active u'orkers in the local branch in Utica. lie 
interested in school, and he contributes liberally to all iin< 

good work undei the auspii o to private cl 

and benevolences, ne distress or re) 

to assist ilu- deserving poor and unfortunate I iki I prising, vvide- 

awal t men hi lanifi »1 a lively interest in seen and at this 

1 ■ ;ith the folloi ^ ation 

been an inflm nji in each, namely: \ttica Lodg< ' i tl 

Accepted Masoi i Royal Arch Ma: ral L"em- 

ple, Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, [ndianapolis ; An- 
cient Accepted Scottish Kite. Sublime Prince of the Royal Secret, Thirty-sec- 
ond Degree: Order of the Eastern Star, Attica, Indiana 
No 143, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, La 

t < )rder 
1 lo vs; 
Shawnee Tribe r\o. 373. Improved Order of Red :n\ Royal 

nan of Ami rica, Camp No. 



r 1890 to 1 1 1 in ia \ . Trebii 
Raj Ei gan, (laughter of C. B. Trebing, and is now 

five "children. whos< names are as follows: J. Frank, Jr., Chai 
jila, Anna .Marie and Ralph Emmerson. 



W. W. SHULTZ. 



The subject of this sketch, a successful farmer and stock raiser and 
since 1909 an honored resident of Newtown, is a native of Fountain county, 
being a son of Isaac and Ann (Ogle) Shultz, the father born in Adams 
county, Ohio, the mother in Fountain county, Indiana. \Y. \Y. Shultz, whose 
birth occurred on June 5, 1858, was reared to agricultural pursuits, received 
his education in the district schools of Richland township audi grew up to 
the full measure of well-rounded manhood with proper conception of life 
and duty. He early turned his attention to husbandry and has continued 
the same with gratifying financial results ever since, being at this time the 
owner of a finely improved farm of one hundred thirty-one acres in Richland 



462 FO0N r \l.\ ..-. D v. 

township, where, in connection with tilling the : 

reputation as a breeder and raiser of high gradi \- already 

Mr. Shuhz resided on his beautiful country place until rcjoo. win 
to Newtown, where he owns a commodious modern home plentifully si 
with conveniences and comforts, and since the year indicated he has 
! identified with the varied interests of the town. \t the - 
time he president Of the town board and as such has 

iou1 much important legislation, besides using his influence in 
other naterial growth the village and add to il 

reputation as a desirable ['.lace o lie is a Republican 

and in hi- religi< its belief wife belongs to Lhe church 

of that denomination in 

Mr. Shultz, in the marrie I to 1 

intain count) . i I larnei . tlie 

resulting in the 1 hildren, 

Ethel Thompson and mai 

widdie, a farmer of Richland township; Etta; wif( I Peek; Lirmie, 

w hose hnsbai rval J< I died 

i [uences 
and have ever tried to kee] unsullied the h ;t 
name. 



BERNARD S. ORR. 

The gentleman to a brief review of whose life the reader's attention is 
herewith respectfully invited is among tlie foremost business men of I 01 
county, and to his enterprise and progressive methods the city of Attica is 
indebted for much of its recent industrial development and general material 
advancement. In the course of an honorable career, his success has been 
very gratifying and the imp- riant position which he now holds in the leading- 
financial institution of his city speaks well for his high standing in business 
circles and for the trust reposed in him by his associates and the public ar 
large. B. S. Orr is a native of Fountain county; Indiana, and the seventh 
of a large family of eight children, whose father, James \Y. Orr, was among 
the earliest .settlers in this part of the state. By occupation James W. ( Irr 
was a wagon-maker. He worked at his trade for some year-, near Rob Roy 
in Shawnee township, and later turned his attention to farming, which voca- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, [ND] 463 

ti.'ii he followed until his death, on the 22d of January, [87C. Mr. Orr 

■ nan 1 I L\va3 took .1 prominent part in the affairs of 

■a a a leadei ui th L-ii publican pari} in the 

township where he lived. He ei ■ ■ ioner al one time, 

■ - ; ! •■ pn hate judge, and after holdin uffice always went bj the 

• :' 'J je" Orr. 1 hi maiden lai I tlrs. J. W. ( >i r was Susan 

hern on lie, 1 came to this count} in an ■ time 

married Dr. 1 lenry Bacon, of Toledo, 

Ohio. She :.- still livin - ttica her home. The following are the 

names of the children boni to : *le woman: Alice, James \\\. 

n '.. Robert ! ; .. Lawrence T., Ingold E., Bernard S. and Edmund E., 



Bernard S. Orr was I 867, and received his early 

cal life on his father's farm, After complet- 
ing the : < :l li school . iurse, I B and Stratton's Business 
College i-.: : I ■ ag . fr >m which he w; 887, and a little later 
he accep ition in th( Fanners ana Merchants' Bank, Attica, 
which he tilled I'erj aca ablj until promoted to assistant cashier of the 
institut hi. H l te latte r capacity until n hen 
elected < ashie , lie has since disch 
in a very ab!e i ecoming 
with evi ry det; .■ | citation a? a 
saf . nd i Idition to his net ions, 
Mr. Orr ha , a usi : ul 11 f thi body politic; he has risen high 
in i!"- confidence and esteem of the public, has always acquitted himself with 
honor and credit, never fallen below the dignity of true manhood, and in 
no respect has he resorted to the methods and wiles of the partisan or dema- 
gogue. He is essentially a man among men and moves as one who commands 
respect by innate force as well as by acquired leadership. 

For some years Mr. Orr has been greatly interested in the material 
progress of Attica, and by his activities and influence he lias clone much in 
the promoting of public utilities, besides contributing to the material advance- 
ment of the city along various other lines, lie has always stood for public 
improvements, and to the limit of his ability has encouraged every enter- 
prise" to this end, besides using his means and influence in behalf of ever) 
measure having for its object the betterii of the social and moral condition 
of the community. A Republican in polii cs, he has never held nor desired 
public office, nevertheless he manifests an abiding interesl in the great ques- 
tions concerning which men and parties are at issue and, like all wide-awake 



464 



HIXTAIA AM) 



KEN C'OL'M 






citizens, keeps in touch with the times on n I pn 

and has ■ ncern i. k fraternal rela- 

tions are v : : - the Mas< liic order, i h ha ; 1 ecu 

time. 

!n die [893 

ter) Hiij united in 1 , the 

w ith on< i hild, a daughter who answers to 1 
Mrs. Orr owns two hundred and sev< 



townshi 

SI 1 a .vn. 
within the cit) 

and Ja< ; 
model 1 

The Parme 

ficially id 

rgest, insti 



Attica icl 

of the ample fortui 

i; dway 

. 1 

irl of 

: ' '• • ■ 

idea of the amount of business which the bank commands and die high place 
it occupies in the favor of the public. The present officers are: T. Reid 
Ziegler, president; J. Allen Wilson, vice-president, and J',. S. Orr. cashier. 



other local bank in 

its condition on the 14th < 



TAMES THOMPSON. 



All credit is due a man who wins success in spite of obstacles and by 
persistency and energy gains a competency and a position of honor as a man 



and citizen. The record of James Thompson, one 
agriculturist-- and best known citizens, is that of 
spent his long, useful and honorable life, partici 
building from a wild woodsy wale to one of the 



I Fountain county''- leadi] 
;uch a man. Here lie h 
pating in her gradual u 
ch ii( e farming sectii ms 1 




JAMES THOMPSON. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, [NDIANA. 465 

the great Hoosier state, and here he has worked out his way from an environ- 
ment none too promising at the outset to definite success and independence. 1 [e 
has been quick to adapt himself to the changing conditions of the times in 
their onward course of events and has labored so consecutively and effectively 
that he now ranks among our substantial and highly esteemed citizens, being 
held in high regard by all who know him for bis life of industry, honesty and 
public spirit. 

Mr. Thompson was burn in Van Bnren township, Fountain county. In- 
diana, July 15, [836. He is the son of one of the sterling pioneer families 
of this locality, Hartson and Rebecca (Rusk) Thompson. The father was a 
native of Freehold, Monmouth county. New Jersey. He spent his earl)- life 
in the East aiid when a young man brought his wife to Fountain county, In- 
diana, settling in Van Buren township, where he carved out a good home in 
the early days and became well known among the pioneers. lie was a wheel- 
wright in early life, but he spent the balance of his life on a farm. 

James Thompson grew to manhood in ins native county and received 
bis education in the early schools of his community, lie turned hi- attention 
to farming when a young man and this has continued his chief vocation; 
however, much of his attention has been directed to handling live stock, hav- 
ing been widely known as a cattle buyer for years, selling to 'ocal shippers 
and butchers, arid no small part of his income has been derived from this 
Sonne He prospered by his close application. Ins honest dealings with his 
fellow men and his able management and became the owner ■■ ; r e hundred 
and fifty acres of valuable land. He has given away a good deal to his chil- 
dren, but has retained two hundred and ten acres, which be has kept well 
tilled and well improved and it is one of the model farms of Van Buren town- 
ship, lie has a large, pleasant home and substantial outbuildings, and he kept 
a good grade of stock, be fore retirement. 

Mr. Thompson was married in 1801 to Caroline Lucas, daughter of 
Joseph, Sr., and Catherine ( Smith) Lucas, old settlers of Van Buren town- 
ship where they became substantial fanners. Three children have been born 
to the subject and wife, namely: Emma married Charles Dice, now deceased, 
and secondly she married William A. Marquess, who is farming on the sub- 
ject's land; Ettie married Fred Layton, a farmer; Joe H. died in 1901. 

Mr. Thompson is a Republican, and while he has been more or less 
active in public affairs, always supporting any movement looking to the gen- 
eral good of the county of his nativity, he has never sought or held political 
office. He was a member of the Masonic order at Veedersburg until [861. 
Mrs. Thompson is a member of the United Brethren church. 

(30) 



466 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Mr. Thompson is now living in a beautiful home in Sterling, a village 
just east of Veedersburg, whither he removed his family some time ago. 
He has made what he has by hard work and is entitled to a great deal of credit 
for what he has accomplished, and he is held in high favor with all who know 
him. 



of 


the 1 


leading 


an( 


1 one 


of the 


i vc 


)luine 


would 


his 


tarn 


ily and 


bee 
Lble 


:n dei 
ly im 

fain 


doped 

proved 

isteads 



JAMES F. CARTER. 

The gentleman whose name heads this review is on 
fanners and stock men of his community in Fountain count 
worthiest sons that Davis township has ever produced, and t 
be incomplete were there failure to make mention of him ar 
the enterprise with which he is identified, his hue farm havii 
from the wilderness by his honored father and later kept m 
by himself until today it ranks with the best and most desira 
in this section of the county. Tireless energy and honesty of purpose are 
the chief characteristics of this man, as they were of Ins father, who was 
well known as a thrifty farmer and large land owner in the earlier years 
of the locality's history 

James F. Carter was born in Davis township, Fountain county, Indiana, 
September iS, 1842, and is the son of Samuel and Anna (Mills) Carter. 
Samuel Carter was born in Ross county, Ohio, and there spent hi 
days, coming from that county to Fountain county, hidiana, as earl; - - ■ 

The mother of the subject had also been horn and reared in Ohio, but she 
and the elder Carter were married in. Indiana. Upon their arrival here the 1 
settled in Davis township on the farm which their son, James F. of this 
sketch, now owns and where he still makes his home. Samuel Carter entered 
this land from the government and here went to work courageously to hew 
out a new home from the vast woods with which this country was then 
sovered. And he succeeded. 

Six children were born to Samuel Carter and wife, namely: Amanda, 
who died in infancy; Mrs. Margaret Beach is deceased; Elizabeth, who 
married a Mr. Bever; James F., of this review; Mrs. Caroline Savers was 
next in order; Robert, the youngest, died in infancy. 

Politically, Samuel Carter was a Democrat and, while lie assisted mate- 
rially in the early affairs of the county, he never held office, lie was a 
member of the Baptist church. At one time he owned nine hundred acres 
of land here and was one of the leading farmers in this locality. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 46/ 

James F. Carter grew to manhood on the home farm ant] he received 
a practical education in the public schools Of Ins native community in Davis 
township, lie has devoted his life to farming and is how the owner of a 
finely improved and very productivi place of three hundred and twenty 
acres, a part »f the Origii hi tead I jonnecti m with general farming 
he handles i g< oi live stock and has a pleasant home. 

Mr. Carter was married on April [6, 1865, to Rachael A. Washburn, 
(laughter of John and Catherine (Drake) Washburn. Mr. Washburn came 
from Ohio about the same time that Samuel Carter came. 1825, and he 
settled in Montgomery county, on Black creek, where he remained for some 
time, then removed to Davis township, Fountain county, where he spent 
the rest of his life, having how been deceased perhaps a half century. His 

Elmer is deceased; Enoch died when eighteen years old; Joseph died at the 
age of fourteen; William lives in Pasadena, I alifornia; Rachael A., wife of 
Mr. Carter of this .ketch: Mrs. Elizabeth J. Bowles is living at Joplinj 
Missouri: Una Albertihe died when four years old; the other two children 
died in infancy. 

Mr. Washburn was a Democrat and a member of the Baptist church, 

in the local Baptist church. 

Three children have been born to Air. and .Mrs. Carter, name!) : Lou 
Emm married Oliver Dodge and they live at Newtown, this county ;"Criarlis 
W. is a retired hardware merchant at \\ iugate, Montgomery county; Anna. 
Catherine married L. B. Wilson, oi" Davis township, this county. 

Politically* the subject is a Democrat, but has held no office. He is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, while bis wife holds membership 
in the Baptist church. 



T. CHALMERS SHULTZ. 

T. Chalmers Shultz, cashier of the Newtown Bank and former popular 
educator of Fountain county, is a native of Indiana, and a son of Thomas 
and Clara (Gray) Shultz, who are noticed elsewhere in these pages. He 
was born June 16, 1877, in Fountain county and received his preliminary 
education in the public schools, this training being afterward supplemented 
by six terms in the State Normal School at Terre Haute, which he attended 
with the object in view of devoting his life to educational work. • Fortified 



468 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

with this excellent professional training, he taught two years in the gi 
country schools and then became principal of the schools of Newtown, winch 
position he held for a period of four years, achieving in the meantime dis- 
tinctive success as an instructor and disciplinarian. Owine to indifferent 



health, Mr. Shulu. at the expiration of the time indicatt 


d, was obliged to 


discontinue school work and dur ig the three years ens 


uing he gave his 


attention 10 agricultural pursuits in Richland towi 


At the solicitation 


of mends, he was induced, in 1907, to . p th position 


i of c.i hier in the 


Newtown Bank, which responsible position he still hold: 


3 and m the dis- 


charge of the duties of the same demonstrates busiiw : > 


ability of a high 


order and a regard for the interests of the institution .viii 


,ch has gained for 


him the unlimited trust and confidence of everybody id 


herewith 


Since accepting- the position he hoy. 




banking until he has become familiar with ev< 




he also has a wide and thorough knowledge of financia 




being well versed upon the leading questions and issues of 




abreast of the times in all that concerns the interests of 


the public. Con- 


scientiuu.- in the discharge of his duties of citizenshi] 





in the body politic, and his aim has ever been to shape h 

the highest standard of ethics, in which nitated 

by those whose characters arc yet to be 

earnest in the support of his political prim', Les, accord with 

the Republican party, he is first of all a business man. ha 
to office nor asked any kind of publi 

citizens. Religiously, lie belongs to in church and, fraternally, 

holds membership with Richland L6dg< No. 205, Tree and Accepted Masons: 
Mr. Shultz was married on June 5. 1908, to Evelyn Roster, daughter of 
David B. and Ruth (Stafford) Foster, of Shawnee township, this county, 
the union resulting in the birth of one child, who answers to the name of 
Gwendolyn Irene. 



M. L. STANTON. 



When old age approaches it is quite the usual thing for a person to look- 
back over his life to find out whether the world is any better for his having 
lived. It must be a gloomy retrospect, indeed, when no good can be found 
upon such an examination. On the contrary what a consolation it must be 
to know that one's life has been an example of excellence for the guidance 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 469 

of youth and for the congratulation of age. How pleasant it must be when 
the evening star of life appears in the. western sky, to be able to say truth- 
fully, "I have lived an honest life and have done my whole duty." ! low many 
old persons who read these lines can hold up their heads with pride and say 
with no compunction of conscience thai the world is better for their having 
lived? Ai. L. Stanton, who, after a long and successful career a-, a stork- 
man, now lives in retirement in his attractive home in Covington, is one of the 
number in Fountain county who can truthfully make such a statement. That 
his life has been honorable and upright may be surmised from the tact that 
he is respected by everyone who ha.- the pleasure of his friendship and ac- 
quaintance. He comes up from the pioneer epoch in t!. : s locality, his parents 



having began life in true first-settler fashion in the days of log 


cabms and 


far-reaching forest.-,, in the days when there were neither turnpike: 


; nor steam 


road?, -when farming was done with crude instruments and whei 


1 neighbors 


were few, but the Stantona were progressive and finally became 


well estab- 


lished here. 




M. L. Stanton is the scion of a hospitable old Southern famil 


y and hails 


from the old 'bar state, his birth having occurred in North Carolii 


ia, January 


11, j 839, but practically all of his life has been .-pent in the VVaba 


sjh country. 


He is the son of Solomon and Charity (Swain) Stanton, who 


spent iheir 


early lives in that stale and wcr^ married there, and from there- 


they came 


overland across the Blue Ridge mountains to Indiana in the earl) 


clays', Iocat- 


ing in Parke county in 184J, when the subject was two years old. 


They built 


a house in the woods and by persistent, hard work cleared ami < 


le\ eloped a 


good farm there, becoming well and favorably known among tin 


: early set- 


tiers. There the parents of the subject spent the rest of then 


■ lives, the 



father dying on July 27, 1850, the mother surviving until December 21, 
1873. Benjamin Stanton, the paternal grandfather of the subject, spent 
his life in North Carolina engaged in farming. The Stanton family has been 
well known in that state for a number of generations. 

To Solomon Stanton and wife four children were born, named as fol- 
lows: Elizabeth, who is deceased; M. L., of this review; Michael was next 
in order of birth; and Letitia, who lives in Kingman City, Kansas. 

M. L. Stanton grew to manhood on the home farm in Parke county and 
there assisted with the general work during the summer months. He was a 
studious lad and, applying himself well to his studies, received the best edu- 
cation that the common schools of that early day offered. He began life fur 
himself by teaching in different graded schools for eight seasons, during which 
his services were in great demand for he was successful as an instructor from 



47° FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

the first. But finally tiring- of the school room he turned his attention to 
farming and stock raising, also bought and sold live stock in large numbers 
from year to year, becoming a successful stock man in this locality. He is 
one of the best judges of live stock in the county. As a careful and progres 
sive tiller of the soil he also had no superiors, keeping his place under an 
excellent state of cultivation and improvement. He owns a fine farm at Cole 
Creek, Fulton township; Fountain county, consisting of one hundred and 
ninety-eight acres, one-half of which is under cultivation. 1 [< keeps a renter on 
the place. He has a fine, modernly appointed home at the coiner of Wash- 
ington and Eighth streets, Covington, where he has lived in retirement since 
1898, enjoying the fruits of his former years of activity. 

Mr. Stanton has been twice married, fir; 
which union five children were born, namely: 
and Nellie. The wife and mother passed aw 
Stanton was united in marriage with Man J. 
without issue. 

Politically, Mr. Stanton is a Republicai 
especially active in political affairs; however, 
support such measures as made for the genera 

in the material and moral development of which he has ever been gre; 
interested. He was at one time trustee of Fulton township, this com 
Religiously, he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal dun 



st to Margaret 


J. Collison. by 


: Clara, Myrta ; 


, Susa, Fred L. 


/ay in 1894, ai 


id in 1896 Mr. 


. Wann, which 


union has been 


n. though he- 


has never been 


be has always 


stood read_\- to 


.1 good of his c 


ounty and state, 



JAMES G. WARFIELD. 

Success in this life comes to the deserving. It is an axiom demonstrated 
by all human experience, that a man gets out of this life what he puts into 
it, plus a reasonable interest on the investment. He who inherits an estate 
and adds nothing to his fortune cannot be called a successful man. He who 
falls heir to a fortune and increases its value is successful in proportion to 
the amount he adds to his possession. But the man who starts in the world 
unaided and by persistent industry and correct principles forges ahead and 
at length reaches a position of honor among his fellow citizens achieves 
success such as representatives of the two former classes can neither under- 
stand nor appreciate. To a considerable extent James G. Warfield. of Cain 
township, Fountain county, Indiana, is a creditable representative of the 
class last named, a class which has furnished much of the bone and sinew of 
the country and added to the stability of the government and its institutions. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARUEN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 47 1 

James G. Warfield was born in Montgomery county. Indiana, on April 
2, 1840, and is a son of George and Mary (Gardner) Warfield, natives, 
respectively, of Tennessee and Hancock county, Indiana. George Warfield 
lived in his native state until he was nine years old, when he accompanied 
his parents on their removal to Butler county, Ohio. His father and mother. 
Adam and Mary (Bowerman) Warfield. were farmers, though the elder 
Warfield had followed milling in Tennessee. They were persons of strong 
character and stood high in the communities where they lived. In 1838 
they moved to Rush count}', Indiana, and two years later their son George, 
father of the subject,' moved to Montgomery county, this state, where he 
engaged in farming, which he followed during the remainder of his life. 
He married Mary Gardner and they became the parents of ten children, of 
whom eight are living, namely: James G., the immediate subject of this 
sketch; Annie, who became the wife of Robert Herron; Mary, the wife of 
William Faunce; John A.; Eunice, the wife of William E. Ellis; Emma, 
the wife of George Hill; Bertha, the wife of Hiram Clark; William H., 
deceased; Margaret, deceased. The father of these children was a Baptist 
in religious faith and a Republican in politics. He died in 1884, at the age 
of seventy-four years, and his wife died in 1805, at the age of forty-eight 
years. 

James G. Warfield received his education in the common schools and, 
upon starting out in life on his own account he took up the vocation of 
farming, to which he had been reared, and in this line. of effort be has labored 
persistently and with splendid results. \n 1872 he moved to Fountain county 
and located on a rented farm in Cain township, where he remained two 
years, at the end of which time he removed to his present location, on a farm 
of his own ; where he has lived continuously since. When he located on this 
land it was raw and undeveloped, but he went energetically at the task before 
him and the present condition of the place stands in unmistakable evidence 
that the owner is a man of energy, good judgment and indomitable persistency. 
The farm comprises one hundred and twenty acres, all of which is in culti- 
vation but four acres of timber, and here Mr. Warfield carries on general 
farming, raising all the crops common to this section of the country, giving 
proper attention to the rotation of crops and the conservation of the soil. 
He is up-to-date in his ideas and methods and the -buildings on the place- 
add to the appearance and value, the residence being confortable and attrac- 
tive, while the barns and other farm buildings are admirably adapted to the 
purposes intended. • . 



■ 17-' l" NTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, [NUIANA. 

On October 15. [872, Mr. VVarfield was married to Anna K. Rountree, 
the daughter of John and Sarah (Kercheval) Rountree, donl 

county, [ndiana. To tins union have been born (lie following 
Mary \i. is the wife of Edwin E. Utterback, a teacher in th dat 
School at Memphis, Tennessee; fennie L. is the wife of Manford I i • . 
who is represented elsewhere in this work; Gertrude C. died at the . 
sixteen years; Edna R. is the wife of Stephen Davis, a druggist al 
town; Lucy died in infancy. 

Politically, Mr. WarHeld is filiated with the Repi 
is now serving a second term as a member of the county c 
has rendered efficient and appreciated service. In religion 
of the Christian church at 

of which he is deeplj inh r< -. : - ing liberally of his meai 
In every line of effort to which lie has applied his •:: 
the best that is in him and because of his upright life and t 
has accompanied his efforts he occupi 1 ' ry dly higl 
estimation of all who know him. 



It 1 




and 


•il, 


whe 

s SUJ 


re he 

,por< 
forth 

chich 


iiti, 


m ii 





CAPT. SCHUYLER LaTOURETTE. 

A citizen of the United State- can vveai no greater badge of hoj 
the distinction of having served the governmenl in the meni • ' 

of war between the states. It is a sacred family inhei ; if renown, to 

be prized like a jewel by all future descendants and kept bright and untar- 
nished by other acts of valor, patriotism and loyalty in the i tterests of free 
government. Even in this day when there are many of the old soldiers liv- 
ing, no one can see one of them dressed up in his faded uniform without feel- 
ing a glow of pride and without showing him studied deference. But the 
ranks of the old phalanx are fast going down before the only foe that they 
cannot meet, and ere long none will be left to recount the actual experiences 
of that memorable four years of sanguinary history. In the meantime, while 
they are still with us, let us pay them suitable honor for their sacrifices, 
patriotism, gallantry and sufferings. One of these honored veterans is Capt. 
Schuyler LaToitrette, one of the well known agriculturists of Wabash town- 
ship, Fountain county, and one of our worthiest pioneer citizens, he having 





CAPTAIN AND MRS. SCHUYLER LAToriiETTK. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 473 

spent his useful and commendable life in this vicinity, laboring for its general 
development while advancing individual interests. He grew up amid pioneer 

conditions when this part of the country was wild and settlers were few and 
lie has lived to see the wonderful transformation that has taken place. 

Captain LaTourette was horn in Fountain county. Indiana, on the old 
homestead in Wabash township, August 24, 1834. lie is the son of John 
and Sarah (Schenck) LaTourette. The father was horn near Manhattan 
Island in 1793, and the mother was born in New Jersey in 1 7<)y. and they 
spent their earliest years in the East and there the elder LaTourette learned 
the weaver's trade, which trade had been handed down for a period of five 
hundred years from father to son. The subject also followed this line of en- 
deavor for a time and his brothers and sister also followed it. John La- 
Tourette, the father, moved with his wife to Gerrnantown, Ohio, in [819, 
and there they remained ten years, then came to Wahash township, Fountain 
county, Indiana, in i8_'S where they established the permanent family home. 
They were thus pioneers and here they found a wild country, devoid of con- 
veniences, not even a good road, but they persevered and never permitted the 
hardships to thwart them and in due course of time had an excellent farm 
carved from the great forest and here they took much interest in the early 
affairs of the county in which they spent the rest of their lives, the death of 
the father occurring on February 22, 1849, the mother surviving to an ad- 
vanced age, passing away in 1873. Of their large family of twelve children, 
four are still living. John LaTourette followed weaving h connection with 
farming until his death. He was a Whig and was active in politics, hut later 
in life he became a Jackson Democrat. He voted the Whig ticket for a time 
after locating in Wabash township. 

Captain LaTourette grew to manhood on the home farm, where he 
found plenty of hard work when a boy, and he received such educational 
training as the old-fashioned schools of his district afforded, and here he has 
been content to spend his life and devote his energies to general agricultural 
pursuits. On August 11, 1862, he enlisted in Company II, Sixty-third Indi- 
ana Volunteer Infantry, and he was soon made first lieutenant, and later for 
meritorious services promoted to captain of this company, in which capacity 
he served until the close of the war, in the Army of the Cumberland, partici- 
pating in the campaigns and battles with Sherman as far as Atlanta, then 
returned, having taken part in a number of important engagements, including 
Resaca, Atlanta, Nashville and others, in all of which he bore himself with 
the gallantry and bravery of the true American soldier. He had the con- 



474 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

fidence of his men and superior officers and won the praise of all for his com- 
mendable conduct on all occasions, never shrinking from his duty no matter 
how arduous or dangerous. He was mustered out of the service at Knox- 
ville, Tennessee, in November, 1864. 

After his career in the army Captain LaTourette returned to the old 
home place and here he has since led a quiet life in connection with tilling the 
soil and raising live stock. He is the owner of an excellent farm ol one 
hundred and sixty acres of rich, valuable laud, most of which is under a high 
state of cultivation and all well improved. About his pleasant old home may 
be seen some fine old trees of the original forest. He has made a specialty of 
raising Red Poll cattle ami Shropshire sheep, which find a very ready market 
owing to their superior quality. 

Politically, the Captain is a Republican of the Abe Lincoln type, but in 
county affairs he prefers to vote for the men best qualified, in his opinion, for 
the offices sought, and while he takes considerable interest in public affairs 
he has never been an office holder. He is an active member of Covington 
Post No. 4, Grand Army of the Republic, and fraternally he holds member- 
ship with the Masonic order and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Captain LaTourette was married in 1863 to Kate Cooper, daughter of 
John and Lottie (Scott) Cooper, a highly respected Ohio family, who moved 
from that state to Fountain count)', Indiana, in 1854. locating on a farm in 
Troy township. One child was born to the subject and wife, Fredj who mar- 
ried Mabel Cossey ; they live on a part of the old place, on which are two 
sets of improvements, one being occupied by them, and the other by the 
Captain and his wife. 



OLIVER H. STRADER. 

It is said that the history of a county is the biographies of its great 
men. Just as truly, the history of a count) - is the combination of the biog- 
raphies of those men in that county who have been active in the work of 
building up the community, and through their energetic and varied interests 
have brought the agricultural districts to a high productive state, and made 
the towns business centers of importance. Among those who have been 
actively engaged and interested in the growth of Fountain county are the 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 475 

men of the Strader family. Oliver II. Strader and his father have both been 
representative citizens in that community for a number of years. 

Oliver H. Strader was born at what is known as Stevens Station, in 
Richland township, Fountain county, August i, 1859. His parental grand- 
parents were Henry and Mary Strader, natives of Montgomery county, 
Ohio, who farmed in that location until they moved to Indiana. Their son, 
Daniel Strader. was horn February 26, 1819, on their farm in Ohio. He 
was the youngest of thirteen children. In \ 826 the family moved to Dry 
Run, near Mellott, Fountain county, Indiana, and Daniel received his early 
education in this state. He was married November 23, 1843, to Sarah Jane 
Barbara Irvin, who died March 17, 1849, leaving three children, Washington, 
Alary Elizabeth and Barbara Jane, all of whom are now dead. February 14. 
1865, he married Frances Matilda Leath. who died March 5, 1882, leaving 
nine children: Edgar A. is a farmer near Chaneyville, Illinois; Elmer T. is 
a farmer in Shawnee township; Berton B. is with the Parry Buggy Works 
in Indianapolis; Daniel M. and Nettie A. are at Kingman, Indiana; Sherman 
S. is farming on the old home place: Horace X. is dead; and Oliver II. is 
living near Veedersbnrg, Indiana. Daniel Strader spent his life on the farm, 
not only raising crops, but breeding fine stock. lie joined die United 
Brethren church at Dry Run in 1845, and moved to Shawnee township in 
February, 1865. His loss was keenly felt in the community, for he was a 
good citizen and a good neighbor. lie was always ready to take an active 
part in any movement for the good of the neighborhood in which he lived. 
Politically, he was a Republican. 

Oliver H. Strader was educated in Shawnee township, and spent his 
early life on the farm. From there he went to Aylesworth and worked in a 
stock and grain office for his father for eight years, learning the business 
thoroughly. After that Mr. Strader turned his attention to farming, and has 
spent most of his time breeding fine stock of all descriptions. On March 28, 
1894, he married Allie J. Perrin, and they have had fixe children: Elsie, 
born May 13, 1895, is dead; Esther B. was born April 6, 1897; Orville D. 
was born June 8, 1899; Jennie F. was born September .28, 1900, and Dennie 
Marie was born February 22, 1907. Allie J. (Perrin) Strader was born 
at Stone Bluff, Van Buren township, Fountain county, Indiana, in a cabin on 
February 1, 1874, and was a daughter of James H. and Anne (Morris) 
Perrin. The Morris family were pioneers in Fountain county, coming from 
Ohio in an early day. James FI. Perrin has been a farmer all his life and now 
resides at Stone Bluff. He was born in Wood county, Ohio, February 1, 



4/6 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

1S40. At the outbreak of the Civil war lie enlisted in the Second New York 
Calvary, and served until (lie close of the war. taking part in the battles of 
Falmouth, Virginia, Cedar Mountain, Fredericksburg, Bull Run, and a large 
number of minor engagements. He was twice wounded. After the war he 
returned home and has since followed farming. He hail seven children named 
as follows: Charles C, a minister of the Baptist church at Areola, Illinois; 
O. U., a lawyer at Craw fords ville, Indiana; Marry E., a farmer at ' 
Indiana; Allie J., wife of the subject of this sketch ; Bertha J., who married 
Dr. Hall, of Advance, Indiana; Usual M., deceased; Clara, wife of William 
Stacker; a farmer in Shawnee township. The parents of these children were 
members of the United Brethren church and Mr. I' m was a life-long 
Republican. 

Mr. Strader is a Republican, and has taken his father's place in the 
community. He has a farm of one hundred and sixty acres; which is in a 
high state of cultivation. All of the improvements on this land have been 
made by Mr. Strader himself, and he has one of the best, farms in that part 
of the country. 



THOMAS MILLER; 



Change is constant and general; generations rise and pass unmarked 
away ; and it is due to posterity, as a present gratification, to gather up and 
put in imperishable form upon the printed page as nearly as possible a true 
and succinct record of the parent's life. One of the citizens of the present 
generation in Fountain county who is deserving of a place in a volume of the 
character of the one at hand is Thomas Miller, well known farmer of the 
vicinity of Veedersburg who has spent his long and industrious life within the 
borders of this county. 

Mr. Miller was born in Richland township, Fountain county, Indiana, 
November 7, 1838. He is the son of Daniel and Ruth (Collier) Miller. Dan- 
iel Miller was born in Pennsylvania and lived in that state until he was four- 
teen years old, then removed to Butler county, Ohio, where he remained until 
his marriage, then moved to Indiana, in 1837, and settled in Fountain county, 
five miles northeast of the present line of Richland township. The subject's 
maternal grandfather, Thomas Collier, came here the same time, 1837, and 
settled in Warren county, at the town of Independence. Grandfather Thomas 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 477 

Miller's family consisted of seven children, namely: Louis, Daniel (father of 
the subject of this sketch), Mrs. Katherine Clark, Mrs. Mar)- Nichols, .Mrs. 
Sarah Iftgert, Mrs. Elizabeth Griffith and Israel, all deceased. 

Daniel Miller's family consisted of four children, namely: Mary Ann, 
deceased; Thomas, subject of this sketch; Mrs. Margaret McKnight died in 
Minnesota; Daniel died in 1X53. Daniel Miller, father of the above named 
children, devoted his life to agricultural pursuits and was a man win had lots 
of friends wherever he was known. 

Thomas Miller, the subject, grew up on the home farm and he received 
hi: education in the common schools, all before he was seventeen years of 
age, for early in life he turned his attention exclusively to farming. In [870 
he was married to Martha A. Morehouse, daughter of Hiram and Elizabeth 
Morehouse, who came to this county in 1835 and settled in Van Buren town- 
ship. Six children were born to Thomas and Martha Miller, namely: /mama, 
who married Frank Cook, lives in Indianapolis; Luella, who married Edward 
Helms, lives in Sterling, this county; Gilbert is deceased; Vernon is a lumber 
dealer in Veedersburg; Lucretia married Guy Smith, of Jpnesboro, Arkan- 
sas; Adelia died at the age of three years. 

Thomas Miller was married a second time, having formed a matrimon- 
ial alliance, in 1898, with Anna L. Lister, daughter of Reuben and Louisa 
( Yeazel) Lister. The father was born in Greene county, Tennessee, and 
the mother was born near Dayton. She was six years old when she was 
brought to Indiana, in 1822, by her parents, who settled near Stone Bluff, 
Fountain county, thus being among the very first settlers in the county. They 
found here a far-reaching wilderness where but a few small clearings had 
been made, and by hard work they in time had a good home and a fine farm. 
Grandfather David Yeazel settled in Van Buren township, this county, in 
1822, being also among the few earliest settlers. He had five children, all of 
whom lived to reach maturity. There were eight children in Reuben Lister's 
family, of whom Anna L., who married Mr. Miller, was the youngest. Her 
birth occurred on December 28, 1856. Here she grew to womanhood and 
received a meager education in the common schools. She likes to tell of the 
days when her mother lived in a typical pioneer log cabin, with greased paper 
for window panes, puncheon floor, clapboard roof, etc. 

Mr. Miller formerly owned one hundred and forty-five acres of land in 
Richland township, but he has disposed of the same and now owns and 
operates a fine little farm of sixty acres in Van Buren township, his land 
joining the corporation line of the village of Veedersburg. His land is well 
improved, productive and very valuable. 



478 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Mr. Miller is a Republican, lie was school director for three years and 
was supervisor of Richland township for one term. He belongs to the Anti- 
Horse Thief Association, No. 107, at Veedersburg. He is a member of the 
New Light Christian' church, and has been superintendent of the Sunday 
school since 1897, has also been a deacon in the church for a period of forty- 
years, having first been made deacon in 1873. lie is an earnest church and 
Sunday school worker and has done much good in this line of endeavor. 



CHARLES A. EVISTON. 

While success cannot be achieved without unflagging industry, the futility 
of effort is often noticeable in the business world and results from the fact 
that it is not combined with sound business judgment. Many a man who 
gives his. entire life to toil, earnest and unremitting, never acquires a com- 
petency, but when his labor is well directed, prosperity always follows. Mr. 
Eviston is one whose work has been supplemented by careful management 
and today he is among those wdio have triumphed over adverse conditions 
and won success. As a manufacturer and dealer in confections and kindred 
lines he is now actively connected with the commercial interests of Attica, 
Indiana. 

Mr. Eviston was born on August 3, 1S79, and is the son of James and 
Minerva (Burnett) Eviston. These parents were natives of Ohio, who came 
to Indiana many years ago, and here the father was variously engaged. 
He was a lumber dealer and also ran a basket factory at Peru, Indiana, 
and at Butler, this state. He is now deceased and his widow is making her 
home at Butler. They were the parents of seven children, six of whom are 
living. 

The subject of this sketch received a good common-school education, 
following which he took a course in bookkeeping and shorthand. He then 
entered the employ of the Wabash railroad as a brakeman, later becoming 
a conductor, and he remained in the service of that road nine year*. In 
1909 he began the business of which he is now the head and met with 
pronounced success from the start. He is now operating the largest candy 
factory in Attica, making all kinds of candies for the home trade, besides 
which he makes from twenty to eighty gallons of ice cream per day, accord- 
ing to the requirements of the trade. He is a very careful and conscientious 
maker of these goods, permitting nothing to go into them but the very best 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 4/9 

of ingredients, and because of the excellence of their ojuality the products 
of his factory are in great demand. Besides his confectionery, Mr. Eviston 
owns a fifty-acre farm two miles south of Attica, a part of which is in culti- 
vation, the balance being timber land. On the latter land there is a coal 
mine which has been operated spasmodically for a quarter of a century and 
is still a good coal mine. 

On December n, 1907, Mr. Eviston was united in marriage with Ruth 
Nave, who was born in Attica on November 8, 1879. She was reared in 
this city and was given a good common-school education. This union was 
without issue. 

Politically, Mr. Eviston is a Republican and has always taken a keen 
interest in the success of his party. His fraternal relations are with the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Brotherhood of Railroad 
Trainmen. Religiously, he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Because of his splendid personal qualities Mr. Eviston has won the sincere 
respect of the entire community. 



MILLARD DeAT: 



Miliard DeAth, the gentleman whose life record appears in the follow- 
ing lines, holds distinctive prestige among the enterprising farmers of Foun- 
tain county, and is a citizen whose influence has ever been along the lines for 
the public good. He occupies a place second in importance to none of his 
contemporaries. The parents of the subject were John C. and Rosanna 
DeAth, natives respectively of Ohio and Indiana and among the pioneers 
of Van Buren township, where they spent the remainder of their lives. The 
name of Mrs. DeAth prior to her marriage was Walker; she belonged to an 
old and prominent family and was a woman of beautiful character and whole- 
some moral influence, who spent no pains in implanting the principles of 
honor and rectitude in the minds and hearts of her offspring. Six children 
were born to John C. and Rosanna DeAth, viz :' Elizabeth, who married 
Daniel Carpenter, of Richland township; Jemima, wife of John Cobb, of 
Lafayette; John W., of Covington; Aaron and Allen, both deceased, and 
Millard, who is the youngest of the family. The father of these children 
died in 1877, aged sixty-five years. Both parents were consistent members 
of the Christian (Disciple) church and exemplified in their daily lives the 
beauty and worth of the faith which they professed. : 



480 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Millard DeAth was born on the 23d day of January 1850, in Fountain 
county, Indiana, and passed his early life on the home farm in Van Buren 
township, where he first saw die light of day. His educational privileges were 
confined to the public schools, but in the rugged school of experience he 
obtained a valuable practical knowledge such as books fail to impart and 
which has enabled him to discharge faithfully and well the duties of a verj 
active and useful life. Reared in a rural district and early becoming familiar 
with farm labor, he very naturally chose agriculture for his vocation and 
has followed the same to the present time, being now the owner of four 
hundred acres of fertile land in Van Buren township which under his 
judicious management has been brought to a high state of cultivation and 
improved with excellent buildings that are among the best in the county. 

As a farmer who believes in the nobility of his calling, Mr. DeAth 
easily ranks with the most enterprising and successful in the township of 
Van Buren and as a citizen interested in all that concerns the general welfare 
he is public spirited, up-to-date and takes broad views of men and things. 
Politically, he may be classified as an independent Republican, being a sup- 
porter of the principles of his party in district, state and national affairs, 
but in matters local gives his support to the best qualified candidate irrespec- 
tive of parties and dictation. Like most progressive men, he is a heliever 
in secret fraternal work and holds membership with the Knights of Pythias 
and Improved Order of Red Men, in both of which organizations he is an 
active and influential worker. 

On January 18, 1877, was solemnized the ceremony which united Mr. 
DeAth and Elizabeth Campbell in the holy bonds of wedlock, to which union 
four children have been born, namely: Everett E., who married Myrtle 
Shade and lives in Richland township; Hugh, whose wife was formerly 
Jessie Rice, and lives in Mellott; Fred, who is deceased, was twice married, 
first to Nannie Gott and later to Orpha Quiggle; Marie, the youngest, is 
still under the parental roof. 



CHARLES E. HUFF. 

The subject of this review, who is cashier of the Mellott Bank, and a 
gentleman of high standing in business circles, is a native of Tippecanoe 
county, Indiana, and son of Henry F. and Amanda (Bennett) Huff, a sketch 
of whom appears elsewhere in these pages. The subject was horn November 
16, 1864, grew up to habits of industry on the farm and in the common 




1 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 481 

schools secured a fair education, which he afterwards supplemented by study 
at liuivie and a wide range of reading on man)- subjects. By diligent applica- 
tion during his leisure hours lie became the possessor of a large fund of valu- 
able knowledge and in due time was accounted one of the best informed 
young men of the community in which he lived. Having early manifested a 
decided taste for business, -Mr. Huff, while still a young man, became asso- 
ciated with \V. W. Garrett in the lumber, trade at Frankfort, which lasted 
three years and proved successful in more ways than its financial earnings. 
Severing his connection with the firm at the expiration of the period indicated, 
he took charge of the Henry Brothers lumber business at Mellott, which 
responsihle position he held with credit to himself and to the satisfaction of 
his employers until 1908 when he resigned to accept the position of cashier 
in the Mellott Bank. 

The Mellott Bank was established in the year kjoi with a capital stock 
of ten thomand dollars, all subscribed by well known citizens of the town and 
adjacent country and the steady growth of business since that time and the 
high favor in which the enterprise is held has more than met the expectations 
of the founders. John A. Dagger was elected president of the bank, Samuel 
Rice, vice-president, and Mr. Huff, cashier, which officers, together with the 
board of directors, are well known citizens of the community and in whom 
the public repose implicit confidence. Being the center of a prosperous 
agricultural country and a trading post of considerable importance, Mellott 
offered exceptional advantages for a bank and thus far the institution has 
fully justified the judgment and wisdom of the organization, besides afford- 
ing evidence of a still larger and more profitable business in the future. 

Mr. Huff possesses business ability of a high order and in his various 
positions has enjoyed the confidence of his employers and acquitted himself 
as a man whose character has ever been above the suspicion of anything savor- 
ing of dishonor. He is a skillful accountant, familiar with every phase of 
banking and to his personal popularity as well as to his ability is attributable 
much of the growth in favor and increase of business which the institution 
has enjoyed ever since its organization. In addition to the duties of his 
position as cashier, Mr. Huff devotes considerable attention to agriculture, 
owning a fine farm of eighty acres in Richland township, from which he re- 
ceives no small share of his income. In all matters concerning the public 
welfare he manifests an abiding interest, keeps abreast of the times on the 
questions and issues before the people, and is an earnest advocate and libeial 
patron of every movement and enterprise having for its object the material 

(30 



482 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

advancement of the community and the social and mora] well-being of his 
fellow men. Politically, he wields an influence for the Republican party, 
though never posing as a politician or office seeker. Fraternally, he holds 
membership with the Pythian lodge at Wingate and the Improved Order of 
Red Men at Mellott. 

Mr. Huff is a gentleman of domestic tastes and has a beautiful and at- 
tractive home in Mellott. the presiding spirit of which is the gracious lady 
who became his wife in the year 1896, and who prior to that time bore the 
name of Lenore Miller, the marriage being without issue. Mrs. J luff is the 
daughter of James and Elmira Miller, a well known and reputable couple who 
have lived in Fountain county for many year> and contributed much to the 
advancement of the community in which they reside. 



WILLIAM A. THOMAS. 

William A. Thomas ranks among the most enterprising farmers of the 
township in which he resides and as a citizen alive to all that makes for the 
best interest of the community and the good of his fellow men. he wields an 
influence second to that of none of his contemporaries. John F. Thomas. 
father of the subject, was a native of Fairland county, Ohio. He received 
a good education, taught school for a number of years in his native state 
and about 1857 came to Fountain county, Indiana, purchasing land in Cain 
township where he engaged in farming and stock raising. Fie was more or 
less a trader during his entire life, met with success in his various lines of 
activity and was in independent circumstances when called from earth in 
1877, at the age of forty-six years. Rebecca Van Gundy, who became the 
wife of John F. Thomas, was born and reared in Indiana. She bore her 
husband four children and departed this life at the age of forty-five in 1879. 
The following are the names of the children to this couple : Charles died in 
childhood; Frank, a farmer and stock raiser of Fountain county; William, 
whose name introduces this sketch, and Zelda, widow of G. Beaver, formerly 
a resident of Kansas and a farmer by occupation. 

William A, Thomas was born May 23, 1861, in Fountain county, Indiana, 
and grew to maturity on the parental homestead in Cain township where he 
first saw the light of day. After completing the common school branches, 
he entered the Northern Indiana Normal University at Valparaiso, where he 
pursued a more advanced course of study, after which he returned home and 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 483 

turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. Mr. Thomas is a farmer by 
choice and has a proper conception of the nobility of his calling. He remained 
in his native township until the spring of 1899 when he bought what is 
known as the Oak Grove farm in Jackson township where he has since lived 
and prospered, the meanwhile making a number of valuable improvements on 
his place, including one of the finest and most attractive private residences 
in his part of the country. His farm, which embraces an area of three hun- 
dred thirty-five acres, all under cultivation, lies in one of the most fertile 
districts of Jackson township and is admirable adapted for agriculture and 
stock raising. As stated above, it is highly improved and its general appear- 
ance of thrift and excellent management impresses the passerby as the home 
of an intelligent, broad-minded American farmer who is up-to-date in his 
vocation and a man of thought and influence among his fellow men. 

Mr. Thomas is a Republican and in religion a member of the Christian 
church, in which he holds the office of elder. He is active in every good 
work under the auspices of the church, contributes of his means and influence 
to all enterprises having for their object the material progress and moral 
advancement of the community and as a neighbor and citizen has the con- 
fidence and respect of those with whom he mingles. He was married oh the 
20th day of January, 1886, to Amanda Adkins, daughter of Dr. Adkins of 
this county, the union resulting in the birth of three children, viz: Ethel, 
wife of Charles Parker, a farmer of Cain township; Harry M. and Dorothy 
E., who are still with their parents. 



DAVID LIVENGOOD. 

The name Of David Livengood, one of our worthy retired fanners, is 
well known to the readers of this work. His active connection with the 
history and growth of Fountain county transcends the limits of three score 
and ten years, and within this time he has been not only an eye witness of 
the many remarkable changes that have taken place, but an active participant 
in the same, nobly bearing his part in the winning for the county a proud 
position among enterprising and enlightened sections. of the Hoosier state. 

Mr. Livengood was born in Jackson township, Fountain county. Septem- 
ber 4, 1841, and is the son of Thomas and Eva (Shuler) Livengood. The 
subject's father came from North Carolina in 1834 and settled in Ripley 
township, Montgomery county, Indiana, on the sixteenth section, temporarily, 



484 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

then entered land in Jackson township. Fountain county, where he followed 
arming the rest of his life, and there his death occurred. He !>ecame a man 
of influence in his community, was often called upon to settle disagreements 
between his neighbors, and his advice was often sought in various things. 
Me lived to the advanced age of eighty-four years. 

The subject of this sketch was two and one-half years old when his 
mother died, and in 1844 his father married again. Three children were 
born to the last union, two of whom are still living. Fourteen children were 
born to the first marriage, named as follows: John Peter, who was a minister 
for a number of years, was born April 19, 1819; Andrew, born September 16, 
1820; Alar)', born November 13, 1822; Kelin, born April 20, 1824; Susana, 
born January 30, 1826; Sarah, born November 9, 1827; Katherine, born 
September 16, 1829; Elizabeth, born January 1, 1831 ; Abigail, born August 
14, 1832; Solomon, born January 1, 1834; Caroline, born March 6, 1836; 
Luciuda, born December 15, 1837; Thomas, born February 16, 1840; David, 
born September 4, 1841. All of the above named children lived to be married 
and become heads of families before any of them died. 

David Livengood was reared on the home farm and was educated in the 
common schools, then followed farming until he moved to Hillsboro, in 1909, 
where he is now living retired. He was very successful in his life work and 
accumulated a competency. He owned one hundred and sixteen acres, and 
is still owner of eighty acres in Jackson township, all well improved. 

Mr. Livengood is a self-made man, and he made a large part of his 
competency by handling horses, mules, hogs and cattle, specializing on Duroc- 
Jersey hogs. 

Mr. Livengood was married in 1862 to Flelen Marsh, daughter of James 
and Margaret (Follick) Marsh, who came here in an early day from Ohio. 
The subject's wife was born- and reared in Fountain county. Five children 
were born to the subject and his first wife, namely : Elzetta married Mr. 
Burke and they lived in Jackson township ; Ida May married Perry Beaver, 
of Jackson township, and she is now a widow; Rosa Olive married a Mr. 
Keller, of Jackson township; Benjamin E. lives at Stone Bluff, Van Buren 
township; Minta died when one year old. 

David Livengood was married again, on March 1, 1873, to Belle-Zora 
Walker, daughter of James and Adeline (Ainsworth) Walker, of Ohio. Her 
father was from Wayne county, Indiana, and he came to Fountain county 
in an early day. Two children were born to the subject and his second 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 485 

wife: Charles K., who lives at Hillsboro, and Lesta, who married William 
Allen, of Jackson township, and they live on the hoine farm. Charles R. 
Livengood married Isa Miller, who was a teacher in the Hillsboro schools 
for a period of sixteen years, and she was also a Sunday school worker for 
many years and much interested in church affairs. 

The subject is a member of the Christian Disciple church, and for two 
years was elder in the same. He was also an elder in the Lutheran church 
for thirty years prior to moving to Hillsboro. 



JOSEPH F. REED. 

It is a pleasure to revert to the life of a good man, a man whose example 
is worthy of emulation by others, one who has left behind him the imprint 
of his personality in such a manner as always to be remembered, as did 
the late Joseph F. Reed, for many years one of the leading farmers and 
stock men of Richland township, Fountain county, Indiana, a man in whom 
there was a combination of characteristics that seldom fail of ultimate success 
in the battle of life, and he was so honest, kind and genial that he was ever 
held in the highest esteem by those who knew him best, lie was a power 
for good in his community and the past history of this locality is indisso- 
lubly linked with his career, consequently his name should not be omitted 
from this work. 

Mr. Reed was born in Van Buren township, Fountain county, Indiana, 
in 1832, and was thus a pioneer child, growing up under primitive environ- 
ments and was of a sterling pioneer family, Stephen and Elizabeth Reed. 
The father of the subject came from Kentucky and the mother from Virginia 
in a very early day and they established the permanent home of the family 
in Van Buren township, Fountain county, Indiana, where they carved out 
a good home from the wilderness and here spent the balance of their lives, 
engaged in general farming. Stephen Reed was a Democrat, but he held 
no office, being a quiet man who spent his time on his farm. He was a mem- 
ber of the Baptist church. 

Joseph F. Reed was reared on the home farm and he received a good 
education in the common schools, at least as good as the schools of that 
early period afforded. In 1858 or 1859 he was first married to Caroline 
Dagger, wbo died in May, 1866. He next married Mary Ann Young and had 
one son, Dan C. Reed, of Attica (see sketch). In 1875 he was united in 



4^> FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

marriage with Emma L. McElwee, nee Coggins, daughter of Jonathan and 
Louisa (Marquand) Coggins. Her father was from Chester county, Penn- 
sylvania, while her mother came from Guernsey county, Ohio. They moved 
to Claysville, Ohio, the father having come to that stale in [832 and was 
married there. Mr. and Mrs. Coggins had a harmonious married life that 
extended over a period of sixty-five years, and they became the parents of 
six children, namely: Emma L., who married Joseph F. Reed, subject of 
this memoir; Harriet, Hortense, Florence. Charles M., who is a physician; 
and Belle. The only two living are the widow of the subject and Dr. Charles 
M. Coggins. The death of the father of the above named children occurred 
at the advanced age of ninety-six years and two months, and the mother 
passed away when eighty-six years and three months old. The} 1 were indeed 
a grand old couple and highly respected by all who knew them. 

One child, Carrie Louise, was born to Joseph F. Reed and wife. She 
married Herman W. Briggs. Fler death occurred on January 16, 1912, at 
the age of thirty-three years. 

The late Joseph F. Reed was the owner of a fine farm of two hundred 
and eighty acres which he kept under a high state of improvement and culti- 
vation, and he carried on general farming and stock raising on an extensive 
scale, and was regarded as one of the leading farmers in his part of the 
county. Fie left a splendid home and a competency at his death, which 
occurred on March 7. 1S90. He was active in politics and influential in the 
affairs of the Democratic party. Religiously, he was a Baptist and was 
liberal in his support of the local church of this denomination. The reader 
is directed to the sketches of Worth and Sampson Reed for a fuller history 
of this well known old family. 



OBEDIAH LEE YOUNT. 

Although Obediah Lee Yount is a Southerner in blood and hails from 
the old Tar state, he has spent practically all of his long, industrious and 
useful life in the North, or, more specifically speaking, right here in Foun- 
tain county where he has acquired a valuable landed estate through his 
industry and his perseverance ; and, too, he has always been a Northerner 
in sentiment, loyal to the federal government, as was evinced by his gallant 
service for the Union during the great war between the states. However, 
he seems to have inherited some of the commendable personal traits of the 



FOUNTAIN AND WAKKKN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 487 

people of the South, being courteous and a kind and genial neighbor, so 
that he has always had a host of friends and stood high in the community. 

Mr. Yount was born in North Carolina, October 4, 1837, and when two 
years old, in 1839, he accompanied his parents to Fountain county, Indiana, 
making the long overland journey in wagons, the trip requiring some time. 
He is the son of William and Rebecca ( Saures) Yount. The family settled 
about three miles west of Wallace, and there the father devoted his atten- 
tion to general farming until he was elected county recorder, which office he 
filled with such eminent satisfaction that he was re-elected, thus serving two 
terms. After his official career he lived retired in Covington until his death. 
His family consisted of fourteen children, named as follows: Methias, de- 
ceased: William F. and Andrew J. are also deceased; Obediah Lee, subject 
of this sketch, was the fourth in order of birth; Katherine, Mary Ann and 
George are all three deceased; Frifina Almeda married Washington Boyd, 
and lives in Covington; Rebecca also lives in Covington; Flosina lives in 
Yeddo; Francis Marion lives in Kansas; Joseph, Charlotte and Mercia are 
deceased. 

Mr. Yount was reared on the farm and received his education in the 
common schools of Fountain county, and when a young man took up farm- 
ing for a livelihood, but his career was interrupted by the breaking out of the 
Civil war. lie gladly left the plow in the furrow and carried a rifle for three 
years on many a bloody field of conflict, having enlisted in Company 11. 
Sixty-third Indiana Volunteer Infantry, on August 11. 1862, and was soon 
at the front with the Army of the Cumberland. He was with Sherman in 
his campaign against Atlanta, participating in the many engagements of the 
same, and later he was with General Thomas in his operations in Tennessee, 
fighting in the battle of Franklin. He was a very faithful soldier and never 
shirked his duty, however dangerous or arduous. He was mustered out at 
Greensboro, North Carolina, June 23, 1863, and was honorably discharged 
at Indianapolis, July 3d, same year. He came on home and resumed farm- 
ing, which he continued with uninterrupted success until 1906, when he 
retired and moved to Sterling, this county, and is now spending his declining 
years in quiet, surrounded by plenty as a result of his earlier years of close 
application to general agricultural pursuits. He owned a fine farm in Cain 
township, which he sold some time ago. 

Mr. Young was married in 1866 to Susan Jane Songer, whose family 
came to this county in an early day. On December 4, 1884. Mr. Yount was 
again married, his second wife being Ma.riah Cook, daughter of Perry and 
Miranda (Lightfoot) Cook, natives of Kentucky, who also came to Fountain 



488 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

county among the earlier settlers, locating in Cain township, where they spent 
the balance of their lives on a farm. 

Five children were born to Mr. Yount and his second wife, namely: 
Orval Lee is a telegraph operator in Chicago; Ordell is a carpenter and lives 
in the town of Attica; Alba married Harvey Larrew, and they live in Vecd- 
ersbyrg, this county; Clarence, who died young. 

Mr, Vount is a faithful member of the Lutberan church. He has never 
cared for public office, having led a quiet home life. 



SAMUEL THOMAS OGLE. 

The subject of this sketch, a retired farmer living in Newtown, is a 
native of Fountain county, Indiana, and an honored representative of one of 
its old and highly esteemed pioneer families. His parents, David and Hannah 
(Knisley) Ogle, were born in Highland county, Ohio. Thomas Ogle, father 
of David, moved to Fountain county, Indiana, in 1824, and settled in the 
vicinity of Newtown, when there was but one cabin in this part of the 
country, and departed this life many years ago, respected by a large circle of 
neighbors and friends. David Ogle accompanied his parents to Fountain 
county in the year indicated and spent the remainder of his life as a farmer 
in Richland township, dying in 1892; his wife preceded him to the grave in 
the year 1852, after becoming the mother of five children. Subsequently 
Mr. Ogle married Margaret Kiff, nee Kerr, who bore him three children. 

Samuel Thomas Ogle, who is an offspring of his father's first marriage, 
was born November 11, 1848, and spent his early life on the family home- 
stead in Richland township. While still young lie matured plans for his 
future course of action, and with a determination to make his life a credit to 
himself and of benefit to the world, he addressed himself manfully to his 
chosen vocation of agriculture and in due time forged to the front among the 
most enterprising and successful farmers of his part of the county. Finan- 
cially his success has been commensurate with the energy and ability he has 
ever displayed in the management of his agricultural interests and business 
affairs, and he is today classed with the solid men of his township and county, 
besides standing high as an intelligent, broad-minded citizen. He owns a 
beautiful farm of one hundred and sixty acres, which includes a portion of the 
family homestead, and his improvements in the way of buildings, fencing, 
etc., compare favorably with the best in the community. After living on this 



fi ill -m ! iyyi ii j in 




SAMUEL T. OGLE. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 489 

place until 1906, he rented the farm and took up his residence in Newtown, 
where he owns a beautiful modern home in which he is living a life of quiet 
and content, enjoying the fruits of his many years of labor and successful 
management. 

Mr. Ogle manifests a lively interest in all that concerns the welfare of 
Newtown, and is identified with a number of public enterprises, being a stock- 
holder in the local bank, the telephone company and various other utilities. 
He is an influential member of the Masonic brotherhood, Newtown Lodge 
No. 205, and the Pythian order, and, with his wife, belongs to the Eastern 
Star. The Presbyterian church represents his religious creed and since 
moving to Newtown both himself and wife have been active workers in the 
congregation worshiping in this place. His domestic history dates from the 
year 1873, at which time he contracted a matrimonial alliance with Henrietta 
McClure, daughter of James and Phoebe (Dagger) McClure, a union blessed 
with six children, whose names are as follows: Esther L. lives in Oregon; 
Everett, a farmer of Richland township; Phoebe, widow of the late John 
Clark, of Clinton county, Indiana; Muriel Joy, wife of John Simpson, and 
two that died in infancy. Some time after the death of the mother of these 
children, Mr. Ogle married his present wife, who bore the maiden name of 
Mable Gray, the ceremony being solemnized in the year 1909. 



COURTNEY W. DICE. 

The subject of this sketch is a leading member of the Fountain county 
bar and occupies a conspicuous place in the legal circles of the city of Cov- 
ington, where he has resided since engaging in the practice of his profession. 
On the paternal side Mr. Dice is of English .lineage, his great-grandfather hav- 
ing immigrated to the United States from England in an early day. He settled 
originally in Pennsylvania, but removed thence after a brief residence to 
Rockbridge county, Virginia, where the family remained until 1827. In that 
year they moved to Fountain county, Indiana, and located in Van Buren 
township, where George Dice, paternal grandfather of the subject of this 
sketch, entered what has since been known as the old Dice homestead, one of 
the earliest settlements in the township indicated. After his death, which oc- 
curred a few years later, the farm fell to his two sons, who still hold it in 
partnership, as they do the various other interests, including a large amount 
of valuable real estate, bank stock, bonds and other property, being at this time 



49° FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

among the wealthiest men and largest money loaners in the county. These 
brothers have always lived near each other and maintained a common in- 
terest, in all their affairs having no financial accounts between themselves, 
all their business being transacted in the name of both and their checks, no- 
tices and other legal papers signed jointly by the two, 

William Dice, the subject's father, was born August J 8, 1837, in Foun 
tain county. lie was reared to agricultural pursuits and in due time became, 
as already indicated, one of the largest farmers and real estate owners of 
Fountain county. His wife, who prior to her manage Was Kate Jones, was 
born iii 1844, in Kentucky, and bore her husband three children, namely: 
Hortense, deceased; Courtney W., of this review, and Maurice, whose death 
occurred in 1885, when one year of age. Mrs. Dice is a woman of fine mind and 
much more than ordinary culture. She received the principal part of her 
education in the old seminary at Covington, and under the direction of sev- 
eral special instructors, and for some years was a teacher in the public schools 
of both city and country, being thus engaged at the time of her marriage in 
1870. 

Courtney W. Dice was born April 21, 1872, and spent his childhood and 
youth on the family homestead in Van Buren township, where he early 
learned by practical experience the real significance of honest toil. In the 
district school near his home he obtained his preliminary educational training, 
later attended the graded schools of Veedersburg until completing the pre- 
scribed course, when he entered the Indiana Normal School at Covington, 
from which he was in due time graduated. Actuated by a laudable desire to 
devote his life to the law, he subsequently became a student of the University 
of Michigan, where he pursued his legal studies until 1896, when he finished 
the course and received his degree. The same year in which he was grad- 
uated Mr. Dice opened an office in Covington, where he has since built up a 
large and lucrative practice, his clientele including the leading men of the 
city and county, to say nothing of the extensive patronage he has acquired in 
other parts of the state. While well versed in all phases of the law, he makes 
a specialty of civil business, in which his practice has steadily grown until 
he now stands at the head of the local bar in that department of his profession. 
A safe and judicious counsellor, unremitting in behalf of his client's inter- 
ests and sound in the basic principles of jurisprudence, he is eagerly sought 
by those who have large and important matters to adjudicate, and his record 
as an honorable practitioner has ever been above the suspicion of reproach. 
Financially, his success has been commensurate with the ability and industry 
displayed in his chosen calling and he is today numbered among the solid 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 49I 

and enterprising men of Covington, owning the large two-story brick build- 
ing in which he has his office, besides other valuable city properly and various 
holdings in and throughout the county. 

Though primarily a lawyer and making every other consideration sub- 
ordinate to his profession, Mr. Dice is public spirited in all the term implies 
and since locating in Covington he has been interested in the city's advance- 
ment and the general welfare of the populace. He is a Democrat in politics, 
though by no means a partisan, and despite the claims of his large and grow- 
ing professional interests, he finds time to devote to his party and has con- 
tributed greatly to its success both in local and general campaigns. Frater- 
nally, he holds membership with the Masonic order in Covington, the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks lodge in Crawfordsville, and in religious 
belief belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church, being a member of the offi- 
cial board of the local congregation in Covington. 

Mr. Dice was married on November n, 1903, to Helen Allen, who was 
born November 17, 1876, the daughter of Col. J. L. Allen, for many years a 
prominent citizen and leading politician of Fountain county. The Allen fam- 
ily came originally from Pennsylvania and were among the earliest settlers 
of Covington. Mrs. Dice's grandfather established the first harness shop in 
the town, which business has been in the Allen name ever since, the present 
owner being R. C. Allen, a grandson of the original proprietor. Mr. and Mrs. 
Dice have two interesting children, Catherine L., six years old, and William 
Allen, whose birth occurred October 2, 1908. 



WILLIAM B. COFFING. 

Among the men to whose activity and influence Fountain county is in- 
debted for its material prosperity and honorable reputation in all that con- 
cerns the moral standing of its citizenship, the gentleman whose name intro- 
duces the sketch occupies a deservedly conspicuous place. William B. Cof- 
fing is a native of Fountain county and the descendant of an old Pennsylvania 
family that came to this part of the state in an early day and took an active 
part in the development of the locality in which they settled. The head of 
the family at the time indicated was Andrew Coffing, the subject's grand- 
father. He entered land in Shawnee township and at intervals purchased 
other tracts until at the time of his death he was the owner of two thousand 



492 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

acres, a goodly portion of which is still in possession of the descendants. Smith 
S. Coffing, son of Andrew and father of William B., was born in 1839 in 
Fountain county and spent all his life in Shawnee township, where his death 
occurred in the year 1905. He was a farmer and achieved marked success at 
his calling and as a citizen, active in the interests of his fellow men, he stood 
high in the esteem and confidence of all with whom lie mingled. Louisa 
Brown, who became the wife of Smith S. Coffing, survived her husband and 
is living at this time at Stone Bluff, Van Buren township, this county. Seven 
children were born to the estimable couple, namely : Mahlon, William B. of 
this review, Ophelia, Leona, Thomas, Smith Allen, and Caroline, all living 
except Mahlon, the youngest being still with the mother. 

William B. Cofhng was born January 2, 1863, and spent his early life on 
the family homestead in Shawnee township, attending in the meantime the 
district school. He grew up with a practical knowledge of honest toil and 
early learned the lesson of industry and economy which served so well as a 
foundation for his subsequent career as an enterprising and successful man of 
affairs. Having decided to devote his life to the pursuit of agriculture, he 
turned his attentions in that direction when a young man and in due time he 
rose to an influential position among the leading farmers of Fountain county, 
which position he still retains, as is indicated by his present splendid estate of 
eight hundred and eighty- acres in Troy township. Mr. Coffing has been un- 
sparing of time and expense in the improvement of his land, all of which is 
in a high state of cultivation and its natural fertility greatly enhanced by 
judicious fertilization and a fine system of artificial drainage, the latter con- 
sisting of nearly thirty miles of ditching, to complete which sixty-three car 
loads of tiling were required. He cultivates the soil by the most approved 
methods, uses the latest modern implements and machinery and, keeping fully 
abreast of the times in all that pertains to agricultural science, never failing 
to realize abundant returns from his farm. Formerly he gave a great deal of 
attention to live stock, in which he met with encouraging success, but for the 
past few years he has been exclusively a raiser of grain, for which his land is 
especial'y adaptable and which has yielded him abundant profits. 

After remaining on his farm until 1899, Mr. Coffing purchased his pres- 
ent fine modern home in Covington, formerly owned by his father, where he 
has since resided. He helped in the building of his house, having assisted his 
father in cutting the timber for the same, getting it sawed and hauling it to 
town, besides contributing of his labor in other ways toward the erection and 
completion of the edifice. He is well situated to enjoy the many material 
blessings with which he has been favored, being one of the financially solid 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 493 

men of his city and county and as a citizen ranking among the most enterpris- 
ing and progressive in his part of the state. A Democrat in politics and an 
ardent supporter of his party, he has never been an office seeker or aspirant 
for leadership. 

Fraternally, he belongs to the Pythian order of Covington and religious- 
ly holds membership with the Methodist church. On November 15, 1887, 
he was happily married to Emma McMannomy, daughter of Col. James Mc- 
Mannomy, whose sketch follows this review, the union being blessed with 
four children, viz: Louise, wife of Henry Knapper Bilsand; McMahannoney, 
Mary H. and George L. ; all except the oldest are stiil members of the home 
circle. Mrs. Coffing, whose birth occurred November 8, 1867, comes of 
sturdy old colonial stock and traces her family history to the Revolutionary 
period, one of her ancestors having taken part in the war for independence.' 
She has been deeply interested in the history of that renowned struggle and 
recently through her efforts a chapter of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution, was established in Covington, in which she is a leading spirit and 
of which her daughters are also members. 

Col. James McMannomy, father of Mrs. Coffing, was born March 5, 
1824, in Ross county, Ohio, and when a lad of twelve years came on horse- 
back to Fountain county, Indiana, where in due time he purchased land and 
became a successful farmer. His father was Patrick McMannomy, who im- 
migrated to the United States from Ireland, when eleven years old, and after 
spending some time in New York City went to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, re- 
moving thence to Ross county, Ohio, where he spent the remainder of his 
days. By trade he was a shoemaker and he is remembered as a man of keen 
intelligence, great industry and sterling integrity. 

When the war with Mexico broke out James McMannomy enlisted in the 
First Regiment Indiana Volunteers, with which he saw one year of active 
service, rising the meanwhile to the position of lieutenant-colonel in his regi- 
ment. In 1849 he joined the tide of emigrants to the California gold diggings, 
going with a wagon train until across the Missouri river; thence, with a party 
of young men as daring as himself, he turned southward to the gulf of Mexico 
and, crossing the isthmus of Panama, took passage on a vessel for San Fran- 
cisco harbor, where he arrived in due time. Proceeding to the gold field, he 
engaged in mining and met with gratifying success, being fortunate in locat- 
ing a claim in an exceedingly rich mineral region. Having accumulated a hand- 
some fortune, he returned in 1850 to Fountain county and invested his means 
in a large tract of land a part of which he improved and all of which subse- 
quently became quite valuable, making him a comparatively wealthy man. 



494 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

In 185 1 Mr. McMannomy was united in marriage to Emmeline T. Ward, 
whose birth occurred in Kentucky in 1826, and who accompanied her parents 
to Indiana in her girlhood. Her grandfather, William Ward, served three 
years in the war of the Revolution and, with the exception of Enos Davis, he 
is the only hero of that struggle buried in Fountain county. At the breaking 
out of the Rebellion Mr. McMannomy enlisted in the Sixty-third Regiment 
Indiana Volunteers and for three years shared with his comrades the fortunes 
and vicissitudes of war in many noted campaigns and battles, entering the 
army as second lieutenant and rising to the rank of colonel before the expira- 
tion of his term of service. Returning home at the close of the war, he re- 
sumed farming and was then occupied until advancing age obliged him to 
cease active pursuits, from which time until his death, in July, 1906, he lived 
a retired life. He was the father of four children, the two eldest, twins, dying 
in infancy. Divit was born in 1855 and died in 1875, Mrs. Cofhng being the 
only survivor of the family. 

An interesting experience in the life of Colonel McMannomy which his 
many friends will be pleased to see in print was his connection with the social 
club known for sixty years as the "The Raging Tads," a name given the or- 
ganization in derision but which the members by unanimous vote decided to 
accept. Thus"" the club, composed of twenty of the best known young men of 
Covington, was established on Thanksgiving day, 1847, an< l held hs nrst 
meeting in the old Brown inn in Covington, where a sumptuous banquet was 
spread, to which the members did ample justice. When the feast had ended 
and the boys sat back from the table to smoke, sing and talk, one of the 
merry makers suggested that they make the Thanksgiving supper an annual 
affair. The idea was at once adopted and it was also decided that the one 
bottle of port wine remaining unopened be produced at each ensuing banquet, 
but not to be opened until the last survivor of the little company sat down 
alone, then he was to crack the bottle and drink to the memory of his de- 
parted comrades. The club met at their annual banquets for a number of 
years, but ere long one by one its members were removed by the hand of 
death until at the expiration of sixty years there were only two remaining, 
Colonel McMannomy and his life-long friend, Lewis Hetfield, of Covington. 
In compliance with the usual custom, these two remaining survivors of "The 
Annual Remembrance Supper" met at the home of Colonel McMannomy's 
daughter, Mrs. William B. Coffing, in Covington, where they partook of a 
bountiful repast, recalled incidents and experiences of their erstwhile com- 
rades and companions, to whose memory the)' again quaffed the ruddy wine, 
while tears coursed down each furrowed face. This was the last real re- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 495 

union, for within a few months the Colonel passed to that mysterious bourne 
which all his comrades but one had already entered and from which no trav- 
eler ever returns, leaving Mr. Hetfield sole survivor of an organization which 
will forever form an interesting page in the history of Covington. Suffice it 
to state that at the ensuing Thanksgiving day Mr. Hetfield entered the ban- 
quet room alone and, cracking the bottle selected for the last survivor sixty 
years before, drank to the memory of the departed, an experience far more 
pathetic than pleasurable and then presided at the table, an office which he per- 
formed at the first meeting of the club and at each succeeding reunion until 
all the members except himself had passed into the land of silence. 



GUY \V. KERR. 



One of the most successful and scientific of the younger generation of 
farmers in Fountain county, Indiana, is Guy \V. Kerr, a member of the 
honored and well known old Kerr family, which has been a prominent factor 
in this part of the Hoosier state from the early epoch of her history, and the 
subject has taken a delight in keeping untarnished the splendid escutcheon 
of the family name. He has been a young man of fine practical ideas who 
has had the courage to carry out his convictions in a tangible form, and. his 
methods of general agricultural pursuits might well be followed by those 
who have been less successful in a similar line of endeavor, as we shall see 
by a brief study of his life record, for he has always believed in doing well 
whatever he undertook and, like Cincinnatus, the Roman of old times, he 
believes in not looking backward from the plow. These and other commenda- 
ble traits have contributed to his success in his chosen field of labor. 

Mr. Kerr was born in Richland township, Fountain county, Indiana,, 
October 27, 1874, and he is the son of Samuel and Virginia (Dagger) Kerr, 
one of our best known and most successful families, a complete sketch of 
whom will be found on another page of this volume, hence need not be 
reproduced here. 

Guy W. Kerr grew to manhood on his father's farm and when but 
a boy made himself useful during the crop seasons, attending the common 
schools of his neighborhood. He is one of a family of four children, three 
of whom are living, namely: Charles D. ; Guy M., of this review; Carrie 
is married and lives at Waveland, Montgomery county. There was plenty 
of hard work for the subject on the home place, for the father was an exten- 
sive farmer, owning at one time one thousand acres of land, so young Kerr 



496 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

grew to be a young man of exceptional industry and, having had an excellent 
preceptor in his father along general husbandry lines, be has turned it all 
to good account in after life and has become well fixed while yet a young 
man, and he now ranks with our best farmers and slock men. He is the 
owner of one of the most desirable farms in Richland township, his place 
being well improved in every respect and on it is to be found a commodious 
residence and large, substantial outbuildings. A fine grade of live stock 
of all kinds is kept by him. His place contains three hundred and forty acres, 
a part of the old home place, and this he has managed so skillfully that it 
has retained its original strength of soil and fertility. 

Mr. Kerr was married on November 17, 1898, to Isabella Beatty, daugh- 
ter of William and Isabella Beatty, a highly respected family who came to 
this county from Ontario, Canada, many years ago and here became very 
comfortably established. Mrs. Kerr was born in Canada and was young 
when brought here by- her parents. She grew to womanhood in Canada 
and received her education in the common schools there. Three children 
have been born to the subject and wife, namely: Samuel, Fletcher and 
Isabella, all at home. 

Politically, Mr. Kerr is a Republican, and while he takes considerable 
interest in local affairs he has never sought the emoluments of public office. 



LOUIS G. RIGGIN. 

The record of a life well spent, of triumphs over obstacles, of perseverance 
under difficulties and steady advancement from a modest beginning to a place 
of distinction in the industrial w r orld, when imprinted on the pages of history, 
presents to the youth of a rising generation a worthy example. Such a life 
is that of Louis G. Riggin, trustee of Logan township, Fountain county, and 
a man who has long ranked among the most highly esteemed and useful citizens 
of his part of the county. The able and conscientious manner in which he 
has ever looked after the' interests entrusted to him have called forth much 
praise from his fellow citizens, so that now, in the mellow Indian summer of 
his years, he can look backward over a long, useful and honorable career with 
no compunction for misdeeds, he having ever done his duty as he saw and 
understood the right, consequently he has nothing to regret. He is in every 
way entitled to the high esteem in which he is held by all who know him and 
to the large material success that has been his, owing to the fact that he is 
one of our splendid types of self-made men, and his history contains many 




LOUIS G. RIGGIN. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 497 

valuable lessons for the youth of the land whose fortunes are yet matters for 
the future. 

Louis G. Riggin was born in Pickaway county, Ohio, October 6, 1827, 
and there the first ten years of his life were spent. In 1837 he came to White 
county, Indiana, as a "bound" boy, working for William Gerton, near where 
the town of Walcott now stands. He remained there until i860 when he 
went to Little Rock, Arkansas. Upon the outbreak of the Civil war he re- 
turned North, to Cairo, Illinois, and in Jasper county, that state, he enlisted, 
in August, 1861, in Company K, Thirty-eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, 
and was in a number of hotly contested engagements in Missouri and Arkansas 
during the first two years of the war. From Jacksonport, Arkansas, he went 
to Cape Girardeau, Missouri, thence to Corinth, Mississippi, and was in the 
siege and battle of Corinth. After that he did guard duty at different places 
until he was discharged in August, 1864. He performed his every duty as a 
soldier for the Union very faithfully and he received an honorable discharge. 
After the war he returned to White county, Indiana, then went to Carroll 
county. In January, 1870, he came to Attica, Fountain county, Indiana, and 
worked by the month for Jonathan Sheidler, for two years. Then he worked 
seven years in the freight office of the Wabash Railroad. He then bought 
live stock for Greenwood & McCoughtry for two years. Then, in partnership 
with Alonzo Green, he bought a cattle ranch in Greenwood county, Kansas, 
where he remained seven months, then returned to Attica, Indiana. Later he 
entered the employ of J. T. Nixon, buying grain at West Point, three years. 
In September, 1884, in partnership with James Martin, he, having retired from 
the grain business, at Attica, bought grain at Covington until the spring of 
18S5, and then bought grain at Williamsport four years. In 1889 he started 
in the elevator business at Wingate with J. W. McCardle, and on account of 
poor health sold out and remained practically idle for a year, then engaged in 
buying and selling live stock, which he continued with ever-increasing suc- 
cess until 1908, when he retired from business, having accumulated a compe- 
tency through his long years of close application and good management, hav- 
ing been successful in .whatever he turned his attention to. He is deserving 
of the highest praise for his admirable rise from the bottom of the ladder to 
the topmost rung, through his own indomitable industry. 

Mr. Riggin was elected a member of the Attica school board in 1882, 
serving on the same for a period of twelve years, in a manner that reflected 
much credit upon himself and to the satisfaction of all concerned. He was 
then elected trustee of Logan township and served with equal success for a 

(32) 



49« FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

period of five years. He was the first member appointed by Gov. \Y. T. 
Durbin on the state pardon board, serving on the same for a period of five 
years, then resigned to again become trustee of Logan township, and lias since 
served continuously, being still incumbent of that office. As a public servant 
he has always discharged his duties faithfully and conscientiously, winning 
the hearty approval of all concerned. Politically, he is a Republican, and 
he cast his first vote for Gen. Zachary Taylor. He has been a Mason for fifty 
years. He also belongs to the Knights of Pythias, the Uniform Rank, having 
joined Rank No. r. He enjoys the distinction of being the oldest member 
of the Uniform Rank of Knights of Pythias in the United States. He is also 
a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, of Lafayette. 

Mr. Riggin is the owner of a fine farm of two hundred acres in Davis 
township, Fountain county, all under a high state of cultivation and well im- 
proved, he having made all the improvements himself. 



LAWSON HUGHES BOOE. 

Many and varied are the momentous changes which have taken place in 
Fountain county, Indiana, during the life of Lawson Hughes Booe, well 
known citizen of Veedersburg, for since he first opened his eves to the sky 
here nearly eighty years have dissolved in the mists of time and drifted away 
to take their places in the annals of the irrevocable past. They were four 
score years of great moment in the history of the world, the most important 
perhaps that the world has ever witnessed. The subject has not by any means 
been a disinterested and inactive spectator to the vicissitudes of that period, 
as it affected this section of the Hoosier state. He has long been numbered 
among the enterprising and substantial men of Fountain county, where his 
long and useful life has been spent, and a brief outline of his career from the 
time when a boy he began his vocation as farmer to the present high standing 
which he has attained, can not fail to be interesting as well as instructive to the 
young men into whose cradle smiling fortune has cast no gilded scepter. 

Mr. Booe was born in this county on April 10, 1833. He is the son of 
Philip and Jemima (Clinton) Booe, natives of South Carolina, where their 
earlier years were spent and from which state they came to Indiana, first set- 
tling at Brookville, later moving to Connersville, thence to Scott's Prairie, 
Fountain county, in 1827, when this part of the state was very sparsely settled, 
and here they established the future home of the family, which they worked 
hard to improve. They had twelve children, named as follows : John is de- 
ceased ; Joseph, William and Washington are also all deceased ; Lawson 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 499 

Hughes, of this review, was the next in order of birth; hidden J. is deceased; 
Amelia married John Willis and they live in Hillsborough. 

Lawson li. Booe grew to manhood on the home farm and he received 
such educational advantages as the early schools of his time afforded. When 
but a boy he turned his attention to farming and in a few years had a good 
start in life, and now in his old age he finds himself very comfortably situated 
as the result of his former years of activity and good management. 

Lawson H. Booe was married in 1850 to Isabella J. Hesler, daughter 
of William and Matilda Hes!er, who came to this county in a very early day. 
Two children were horn of this union, namely: Ida J., who married Silas 
Vickery, of Covington, is deceased; the other child died in early life. In 
1869 Mr. Booe was united in marriage with Matilda Campbell, and to this 
union one child was horn, Ellora, who married a Mr. O'Rear. 

Fraternally, Mr. Booe is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons, 
Lodge No. 491, at Veedersburg. Religiously, he belongs to the Christian 
church, and he is a very faithful supporter of the same. 



MONT BOORD. 



Holding worthy prestige among the representative men of Covington is 
the gentleman whose name introduces this sketch, who in the line of his call- 
ing fills an important place in the affairs of the city and stands high in the 
esteem and confidence of his fellow citizens. Mont Boord. proprietor of the 
leading furniture and. undertaking establishment of Covington, is a native 
of Fountain county, Indiana, and dates his birth from November 14, 1857. 
His father was Oliver Boord, whose birth occurred in this county, and his 
mother, who bore the maiden name of Catherine Ludlow, was born in the 
state of Ohio. Oliver Boord engaged in farming until about thirty years of 
age, when he moved to Covington and engaged successively in the drug, 
hardware and hotel business, and is now leading a retired life. He enlisted 
in the year of 1861 in the Eighty-sixth Indiana Regiment and was lieutenant 
of his company. 

Mont Boord was reared in his native county and received a good practi- 
cal education in the schools of Covington, which he attended at intervals dur- 
ing his minority. On July 1, 1879, he engaged in the furniture and undertak- 
ing business at Covington, where by close attention to the business, he gained 
the confidence of his patrons and in due time became familiar with every 
phase of the business. He has built up an extensive and lucrative patronage, 
being, as already indicated, the largest dealer in his jine in the city and con- 



500 I'OUNIAIN AND WARKKN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

ducting an undertaking establishment which in completeness of stock and the 
latest and most approved equipment compares favorably with similar estab- 
lishments in much larger and more pretentious places. 

Mr. Boord was a charter member of the Indiana Funeral Directors As- 
sociation, and at the thirty-second annual convention of that body, held in 
the year 191 1, he was honored by being elected its president, which position 
he held for one year. As a business man Mr. Boord enjoys an honorable 
reputation and to him in great measure is due the recent substantial growth 
of Covington, in the material advancement of which he has always manifested 
an active interest. Quick to perceive, wise to plan and possessing business 
ability of a high order, he has wrought wisely and well and in him are com- 
bined the sterling qualities of manhood and citizenship which give character 
and stability to a community and make its name honored at home and abroad. 

Mr. Boord has been twice married, the first time on the 26th day of 
September, 1883, to Flora Bodine, who departed this life on March 30, 1906. 
To this union were born two children : Alma B., wife of Roy A. Rogers, who 
is engaged in the sand and gravel business, and Paul C, a grocery man of 
Covington. The subject's second marriage was solemnized on June 26, 1907, 
with Mrs. Mary Crawshaw, nee Tipton, of Muncie, this union being without 
issue. 

In his political belief Mr. Boord may be classified as an independent Re- 
publican, being an earnest supporter of the principles and policies of his party, 
but in local affairs giving his support to the candidate best qualified for the 
office to which he aspires, irrespective of partisan dictation. He is a member 
of the Presbyterian church and is holding at the present time the position of 
elder in the local church at Covington. Like the majority of enterprising, 
wide-awake men, he is deeply interested in secret fraternal work, being a 
member of the Masonic order, the Knights of Pythias and the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. Personally, he is quite popular with his fellow citi- 
zens and his friends are as the number of his acquaintances. 



MANFORD LIVENGOOD. 

Prof. Manford Livengood, superintendent of the Fountain county public 
schools and one of the leading educators of his part of the state, is a native of 
Indiana and a son of Kelin and Amanda Livengood, the former born in North 
Carolina, the latter in Kentucky. Thomas Livengood, the Professor's grand- 
father, was born in 1797, in the Old North state and migrated to Fountain 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 5OI 

county, Indiana, in pioneer times, where he cleared a farm and spent the re- 
mainder of his days, departing this life in the year 1876. Kelin Livengood, 
whose birth occurred on April 20, 1824, accompanied his parents to Fountain 
county, Indiana, when ten years of age and grew to maturity on the home farm 
in Jackson township, which he helped clear and develop. He received but little 
schooling, notwithstanding which he became a man of much more than ordin- 
ary intelligence and for many years was a leader among his neighbors and 
fellow citizens, and in no small degree a molder of public opinion in his 
section of country. He always manifested a lively interest in matters peiv 
taining to the general welfare, took strong grounds on the political questions 
of the times and by reason of his ability as a public speaker wielded a wide 
influence in behalf of the policies which he advocated and the party to which 
he yielded allegiance. He possessed well balanced judgment and keen dis- 
cernment in matters of business, became a rapid and accurate accountant and 
for many years his services were utilized by his neighbors and friends in the 
settlement of estates, also as in the adjustment of difficulties and misunder- 
standings which, but for his judicious advice, might have led to unfortunate 
and expensive litigation. His was indeed a useful life, filled to repletion with 
good to his fellow men and his death, which occurred in the month of Sep- 
tember, 1909, was greatly deplored by the people among whom he had so 
long lived and for whose advancement he had spared no reasonable efforts. 

Amanda Purnell, who became the wife of Kelin Livengood in 1844, was 
born near Flemingsburg, Kentucky, in 1829, and when three years old, was 
brought to Fountain county, Indiana, by her parents, where she has since 
lived and where her father, John Purnell, an old and respected citizen, also 
resides. The children of this marriage, nine in number, were as follows : 
Sarah E., wife of John Davis, lives in Cayuga; Pleasant married Hester 
Grimes, and is a resident of Fountain county ; Katherine, now Mrs. Eli Myers, 
lives in the county also ; Elminia, the fourth of the family, is deceased ; Levi, 
whose wife was formerly Stella Frazier, resides not far from the place of his 
birth; James is deceased; Christina died in her youth; Manford, of this re- 
view, being the eighth in order of birth ; and Austin, the youngest of the num- 
ber, married Maud Wright and is a well-known farmer of his native county. 

Manford Livengood, to a brief review of whose career the residue of- 
this sketch is devoted, was born May 22, 187 1, in Fountain county, Indiana, 
and received his preliminary educational training in the old Jackson township 
graded school, where he early manifested a decided predilection for books and 
study and gave evidence of the strong mentality which subsequently enabled 
him to take advanced grounds as a scholar and educator. Later he entered-. 



5©2 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

the Independent Normal School at Covington, where he was graduated in 
1893, following which he spent several terms in the State Normal School at 
Terre Haute, the discipline then received heing afterwards supplemented by a 
three-years' course in the State University. Well fitted by academic and pro- 
fessional training, Mr. Livengood entered upon what has proven a notable 
educational career, his first work being as superintendent of the public schools 
of Newtown. After reorganizing the educational system of that village and 
placing the school upon a firm and successful basis, he was elected superin- 
tendent of schools of Mellott, where he remained for a period of six years, 
during which time he made the schools among the best in the state and earned 
an honorable reputation as an eminently successful manager and instructor. 
While holding this position at the latter place, in 1907, Professor Livengood 
was elected superintendent of the schools of Fountain county, which office be 
has since retained and in which he has displayed unusual ability in the line of 
organizing, the adopting of improved methods and in general educational 
work. 

During the five years Professor Livengood has been at the head of the 
educational interests of Fountain county, the schools under his efficient man- 
agement have made commendable progress, and in the matter of general effi- 
ciency they compare favorably with those of any other county in the state. 
The high character which he has achieved as an educator has earned for him 
much more than local repute, both as a teacher and superintendent, and, in 
view of his untiring energy and painstaking efforts, it is safe to assume that 
there are few if any more popular school officials in Indiana. He is now in 
the prime of vigorous manhood, possesses genial manners, a winning person- 
ality and with his superior scholarship and many years of practical experience, 
it is safe to predict for him a future of still greater efficiency and usefulness. 
He is a member of the state reading circle board. 

On September 4, 1898, Professor Livengood was happily married to 
Jessie L. Warfield, of Fountain county, Indiana, a union blessed with two 
children, Norman Dale, born June 16, 1903, and Marion L., whose birth oc- 
curred November 29, 1906. In matters political the Professor is an uncom- 
promising supporter of the Democratic party, and as such wields a strong in- 
fluence in public affairs, being ever ready to defend the principles which he 
believes to be for the best interests of the people. In religion he subscribes to 
the Presbyterian creed, and is an earnest advocate and liberal donor to all 
worthy charitable and benevolent enterprises. Fraternally, he belongs to the 
Knights of Pythias and Improved Order of Red Men, in both of which orders 
-he has been honored from time to time with important official positions. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 503 

F. B. GOOKINS. 

The history of a county or state, as well as that of a nation, is chiefly a 
chronicle of the lives and deeds of those who have conferred honor and dig- 
nity upon society. The world judges the character of a community by those of 
its representative citizens and yields its tribute of admiration and respect to 
those whose works and actions constitute the record of a state's prosperity and 
pride. Among- the progressive citizens of Fountain county, who are well 
known because of their success in private business affairs and the part they have 
taken in the general upbuilding of the locality is F. B. Gookins, proprietor 
of a grocery store in the town of Veedersburg. 

Mr. Gookins was born in Perrysville, Vermillion county, Indiana, Janu- 
ary 9, 1847, aiK l > s tne son of Milo and Mary (Barnes) Gookins. The father 
was born in Rupert, Vermont, in 1800, while the mother was born in Ohio in 
181 1. He came west when young and married in Clinton, Indiana. He de- 
voted the major part of his life to merchandising, in Farke and Warren 
counties for the most part. His family consisted of eight children, an equal 
number of sons and daughters. The death of Milo Gookins occurred on 
August 18, 1870, and his wife passed away on August 9, 1878. The subject's 
paternal grandfather passed away in early life at his home in New England. 
Soon afterward his widow, Milo Gookins and Mary Barnes started for the 
west in a wagon, making the long journey from Vermont to Indiana in the 
days when roads were rough and streams were unbridged. Grandfather Gook- 
ins had originally lived in the state of New York, moving from there to Ver- 
mont. On the trip to the West, the subject's grandmother was taken sick at 
Fort Harrison, and she died in the fort, and there Milo Gookins grew to 
manhood. 

F. B. Gookins received his education in the common schools and he has 
devoted His life to farming and merchandising. He has been engaged in the 
grocery business at Veedersburg for two and one-half years and has built up 
a large and growing trade with the town and surrounding country. He has a 
meat store and carries an excellent line of fancy and staple groceries at all 
seasons. He formerly lived at Sterling, where he carried on general farming 
and teaming, and at that time he resided in Fountain county, five miles from 
the town of Sterling. 

Mr. Gookins was married on November 6, 1872, to Emma Wertz, 
daughter of William and Rosa (McClure) Wertz. These parents lived in 
Pennsylvania in early life, later moving to Fountain county, Indiana, and here 
Mrs. Gookins grew to womanhood and was educated. Five children have 



504 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

been born to the subject and wife; namely: Eunice married James Cook, who 
is a rural mail carrier; Frank VY. is deceased; Esta married Elmer Marsh, a 
farmer, and they live on a farm three miles from Sterling; Harry R. married 
Mamie Lighty and they live in Sterling, where he is engaged in business with 
his father; Marie is at home. 

Politically, Mr. Gookins is a Republican, and while he is loyal in his 
support of the party's principles, he has never sought political ofhce. Frater- 
nally, he is a member of the Independent Order of Foresters, and in religious 
matters he belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church and is very faithful in 
his attendance on the same. 



J. E. HADLEY. 

J. E. Hadley was born in Fountain county, Indiana, September 9, 1849, 
the son of William and Achsa (Osborne) Hadley, natives respectively of 
North Carolina and Indiana. The subject's grandfather, Joshua Hadley, 
also a North Carolinian by birth, migrated in an early day to Orange county, 
Indiana, removing thence after a few years to the county of Parke, where he 
purchased land and in due time became a successful farmer and enterprising 
citizen. 

William Hadley was two years old when his parents settled in Orange 
county. He grew to manhood on the homestead farm and in 1848 changed 
his residence to Fountain county,, where he spent a number of years as a tiller 
of the soil. William and Achsa Hadley were members of the Society of 
Friends and are remembered as a most exemplary and excellent couple; each 
rounded out a well ordered life and left to their descendants the heritage of a 
name undimmed by the slightest suspicion of dishonor. Their children, six 
in number, were Alvin, Charles, Martha E., J. E., Milton and Elvet M., three 
of whom are living. 

J. E. Hadley received his preliminary education in the common schools, 
and by diligent study at home acquired a thorough knowledge of several of 
the higher branches of learning, and while still a youth, he taught several 
terms of school, alternating his work in the school room with farming, to 
which he devoted the spring and summer months. Subsequently he discon- 
tinued teaching, the better to give his entire attention to agriculture, which 
honorable vocation he has followed ever since, and in the prosecution of 
which he has achieved success such as few attain. His farm, consisting of 
one hundred and sixty acres of valuable land, is admirably situated in one of 




J. E. HADLEY AND FAMILY. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 505 

the most fertile and productive parts of the county and is well adapted to 
general agriculture, besides containing some excellent pasture and a sufficiency 
of timber for all practical purposes for years to cume. Like the majority of 
progressive farmers, he relies largely upon live stock for an income and as a 
breeder and raiser of fine Poland China hogs, short horn cattle and draft 
horses, his reputation is second to none of his compeers. He has made all of 
the improvements on his place and the condition of the buildings, fences, etc., 
and the attractive appearance of everything on the farm, bespeaks the pres- 
ence of a man who believes in the dignity of his calling and who stands high 
in the esteem and confidence of his neighbors and fellow citizens. Politically, 
he votes the Republican ticket, and religiously is a birth-right member of the 
Society of Friends, with which church his wife and family are also identified. 
In the year 1872 was solemnized the marriage of Air. Hadley and Anna 
M. Robbins, daughter of William C. and Fanny (Swimm) Robbins, of North 
Carolina, the father for many years an honored resident of Parke county. 
Mr. Robbins came to Indiana in an early day, making the trip from North 
Carolina on horseback when the country was wild and conditions by no means 
favorable for traveling. He bought land in Parke county, which he cleared 
and developed and was long one of the prosperous farmers of the community 
in which he lived. Air. and Airs. Hadley have five children, namely: Clar- 
ence E., who is in the mail service at Kingman ; William A., a fanner residing 
a short distance north of that town; Beulah E., a teacher in the public schools 
of Fountain county; Lenora Ethel, wife of Samuel Ratcliff, a farmer and 
hardware merchant of Kingman, and Ondus E., who lives with his parents and 
assists in cultivating- the home farm. 



HARRIS GLASCOCK. 

Success has attended the efforts of Harris Glascock, a well known citi- 
zen of the vicinity of Veedersburg, for he has directed his efforts along legit- 
imate lines of endeavor and has never depended upon anyone to do his 
planning or his work. He comes of one of the old and highly respected fami- 
lies of Fountain county, and he has devoted his life to general farming and 
veterinary surgery, being one of the best known devotees of the latter 
science during more than a quarter of a century. He is not so active in the 
affairs of life now as formerly, having accumulated a competency to insure 
his old age free from want, and he is now enjoying the fruits of his long life 
of toil and endeavor. 



506 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Mr. Glascock was born in Fountain county, Indiana, December 18, 1847, 
and is the son of Francis Jackson Glascock and Elizabeth (Reynolds). Glas- 
cock. The father of the subject was three times married and his son Harris 
was a result of the first union. The father's birth occurred an June 21, 1821. 
He was a native of Kentucky, while his' wife was born in Indiana. He came 
to Fountain county when a child and here he was married. Francis J. Glas- 
cock spent the rest of his life in this county, with the exception of three years 
in Danville, Illinois. Besides the subject, there was born of his first marriage 
a daughter, Harriet. His second wife was Isabella Moffett, by whom two 
children were born, Nancy and Henry. His third wife was Josephine Buoe, 
which union was without issue. He devoted his life to general farming and 
stock raising, and he took considerable interest in public affairs. He very 
ably discharged the duties of justice of the peace for a period of twelve years. 

Joseph Glascock, the paternal grandfather of the subject, was a soldier in 
the Mexican war. He made his home on a farm between Veedersburg and 
Hillsboro until his death and was a leading pioneer of that locality. 

Harris Glascock grew to manhood on the home farm and he received his 
education in the common schools. He was married in 1S70 to Francena Dice, 
daughter of William Dice, Sr. She was born in Van Buren township, Sep- 
tember 22, 1850. Here she grew to womanhood and received her education. 
Her mother was known in her maidenhood as Martha Jane Norris. Fuller 
mention of the parents of Mrs. Glascock may be found in the sketch of John 
J. Rivers, appearing on another page of this work. Mrs. Glascock was one of 
five children, three daughters and two sons. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Harris Glascock have been born the following children : 
Francis Jackson, who married Alice Dyer, is a mechanic and makes his home 
at Sterling; Alice married John Perry, who was postmaster twelve years at 
Kramer, Warren county ; Nettie Arnetta married W. A. Morgan and they live 
in Stone Bluff; Harriett married George Asberry and they live near Veeders- 
burg on a farm on the Stone Bluff road; Earle E. married twice, first Clara 
St. Clair, of Veedersburg, and secondly, Anna Cass; he is a painter by trade 
and lives in Chicago. 

For a period of thirty-seven years Harris Glascock carried on farming 
and also practiced veterinary surgery, but he made no specialty of stock rais- 
ing. He was very successful in both lines and was regarded as one of the 
best veterinaries the county has ever had, his services being in great demand 
for miles around. He formerly owned a valuable farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres, which he improved himself. It was very well located just east 
of the town of Veedersburg, but, desiring just enough land to keep him busy 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 5O7 

in his old age when he wanted something to employ his attention, he lias sold 
all his land but seven acres. 

Fraternally, Mr. Glascock is a member of the Masonic order at Veeders- 
burg, and in religious matters he belongs to the Christian church. In politics 
he is a Democrat, but has never been especially active in public affairs. He 
has lived to see great changes in this locality since the days when he attended 
the old log school house, with its greased paper for window panes and its 
rude slabs for seats. However, he was one of those who improved such op- 
portunities as he had and he received a good education, and taught school 
very acceptably for seven terms prior to his marriage. He talks most inter- 
estingly of those early times. 



SMITH REMSTER. 



In examining the life records of the citizens of Fountain county it is 
gratifying to note that so many of her people have been born and reared here; 
in fact, have spent their entire lives in this vicinity. It proves the stability of 
the people and also indicates that this is an excellent place to live and that a 
livelihood may be here obtained with the least expenditure of labor possible, 
so that we have a quiet, satisfied, law-abiding and worthy citizenship and a fair 
and prosperous country, equal to any in the sisterhood of counties in the great 
Hoosier commonwealth. The Remsters are among the honored pioneer citi- 
zens here and they have done their full share of the work of furthering the 
development of the county. One of the well known members of this old fam- 
ily is Smith Remster, farmer and stock man near Veedersburg. He was born 
in Fountain county, Indiana, April 17, 1851, and is the son of Andrew and 
Tamson (Smith) Remster, both natives of Salem county, New Jersey, the 
date of the father's birth being January 19, 1829, and that of the mother's 
January 28, 1834. The latter was the daughter of Samuel Smith and wife. 
Andrew Remster spent his early life in his native state, emigrating from New 
Jersey to Ohio and later married in the latter state, soon after which event 
he and his wife sought a new home in the frontier of western Indiana, making 
the overland journey to Fountain county in a two-horse wagon, by way of 
Indianapolis, which place at that time had but a few rude huts and there was 
no railroad in this part of the country anywhere. They began life in true 
pioneer style here and by hard work had in time a comfortable home, and 
here they spent the rest of their lives engaged in genera! farming, the death 
of the subject's father occurring on November 22, 1865, his widow surviving 
many years, dying at an advanced age, on February 12, 1902. The paternal 



508 FOUNTAIN AND WAKREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

grandfather of the subject spent his life in N,c\v Jersey, where he reared his 
family of four children. 

Smith Remster grew to manhood on the home farm here and when a 
boy he worked hard assisting his father tend to his crops and his live stock, 
and during the winter months he attended the common schools in his neigh- 
borhood, but most of his education has been obtained by home reading, books 
and periodicals. He has always been a farmer, and in connection with gen- 
eral farming he raises Poland China hogs, his excellent hogs having always 
found a ready market. He formerly raised short horn cattle but he now de- 
votes his attention to Jerseys for the most part and is making good, just as 
he did with the other breed, for he understands well the successful handling 
of live stock. He is the owner of a valuable and productive farm of one hun- 
dred and twenty acres, all tillable with the exception of about ten acres, on 
which is a young growth of timber. His farm is well located three miles 
north of Veedersburg, on the xAttica road. Politically, Mr. Remster is a Demo- 
crat; however, he has never been an aspirant for political offices, the only 
public position he ever held being that of a member of the county council of 
Fountain county. He is a member of Lodge No. 246, Knights of Pythias, 
of Veedersburg. In religious matters he belongs to the United Brethren 
church and was at one time trustee of the parsonage. 

Mr. Remster was married to Ruth Galloway, daughter of George and 
Catherine (Cofhng) Galloway, and they have one child, George Andrew 
Remster, who is but a child with his parents at home at this writing. 

George Galloway was born in Kentucky in 1817 and died April 7, 1877, 
aged sixty years. He was one of the early settlers of Fountain county, his 
father having bought land from the government, the farm still remaining 411 
the family. 



BERT O..HIJDLER. 



There is much in the life record of Bert O. Hudler, editor and owner of 
The Kingman Star, an excellent weekly paper published at Kingman, Foun-' 
tain county, worthy of commendation and admiration. Like many other brainy, 
energetic young men who have left their impress upon the magnificent devel- 
opment of this part of the great Hoosier state, he did not wait for a specially 
brilliant opening. Indeed, he could not wait, for his natural industry would 
not have permitted him to do so. In his early youth he gave evidence of the 
possession of traits of character which have made his life exceptionally sue- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 5O9 

cessful and he is today admittedly one of Fountain county's foremost and 
best known citizens of the younger generation. Through his well edited and 
progressive paper he is doing much for the permanent good of the locality, 
whose interests he has at heart and seeks to promote in every way possible. 

Mr. Hudler was born in Howard count)', Indiana, near the town of 
Cappy, September 2, 1882. He is a son of Charles W. and Sarah A. (Bos- 
well) Hudler, farming people, natives of North Carolina and Ripley county, 
Indiana, respectively. The father resides at Boswell, this state, the mother 
having passed away on May 2, 1906. They became the parents of eight chil- 
dren, named as follows: Lavonia A. married Marion Tribbett, of Pine Vil- 
lage; Bert O., of this review; Maude A. married James H. Smith, of Bos- 
well, Indiana; Daly M. married Mary Satterthwaite, of Tine Village; Daisy 
M. married Robert Morelee, of Leavenworth, Kansas; Winnie L. lives in 
Leavenworth, Kansas; Odus E. lives in Veedersburg; Catherine Gertrude 
lives in Warren county, Indiana. 

Charles W. Hudler, father of the above named children, is a Democrat, 
and, fraternally, he is a member of the Knights of Pythias. 

Bert O. Hudler received his early education at Pine Village, Indiana, 
laying there the foundation of a later broad and comprehensive general 
knowledge that has been gained through a wide course of home reading and 
by actual contact with the business world. When a young man he spent five 
months learning the boiler maker's trade, but this not proving entirely to his 
liking, he abandoned it and entered the office of The Warren Sentinel at Pine 
Village. He seemed to have marked natural ability for journalism and made 
rapid progress in the same. After remaining in that office a year, he pur- 
chased the plant, which he operated successfully eighteen months. On August 
13, 1906, he purchased The Kingman Star, one of the leading weekly news- 
papers of the Wabash valley, and this he still publishes. He has built up the 
property, brightened the paper very materially from a mechanical viewpoint, 
made it a newsy, modern and valuable organ for the general good of the com- 
munity, and rendered it a valuable advertising medium, and it has proven a 
very successful financial venture under his management. 

Mr. Hudler was married on April 23, 1905, to Harriet A. Hickman, 
daughter of Harrison and Ellen (McKenzie) Hickman, a highly respected 
family of Attica, Indiana. Fraternally, he belongs to the Knights of Pythias. 

Mr. Hudler is, by nature, a musician of no mean ability, and devotes 
considerable time to the study of music, for pastime. He is a director of the 
Kingman Band, which is one of the best in the county, and its prestige has 
been due in large part to his efforts. 



JIO FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

JOHN W. MARTIN. 

It is with pleasure that the biographer has the opportunity to place before 
the readers of this work the life record of the gentleman whose name ini- 
tiates this paragraph, for he is deemed eminently worthy of representation 
along with the best and most industrious citizens of Fountain county, owing 
to the fact that he belongs to the energetic and enterprising class that has made 
this favored section one of the most desirable in the great Hoosier common- 
wealth. Enjoying distinctive prestige as a lumberman, Mr. Martin has 
achieved marked success, while his practical intelligence, mature judgment 
and sound business principles have had much to do in molding public senti- 
ment in the community which he has selected for the scene of his life labors. 

John W. Martin, of Veedersburg, was horn in Homer, Minnesota, March 
17, 1867. He is the son of Henry M. and Mary E. (Corbin) Martin, natives 
of Boone county, Indiana. When a youth Henry M. Martin accompanied 
his parents to Minnesota and located on a farm where his father, Wesley M. 
Martin, ended his days. They were early residents of that section of the 
Gopher state. Henry M. Martin was a successful business man and a good 
citizen in every respect. He was a soldier in the Civil war. Henry M. Mar- 
tin left Minnesota in 1880 and operated a flour mill in Johnstown, Indiana, 
for about six years, later ran a saw mill in Crawfordsville, and in 1888 he 
came to Veedersburg and engaged in the heading business until 1892, in which 
year his plant was destroyed by fire ; he then went to Terre Haute, thence to 
Memphis, Tennessee, and he is at this writing a resident of Jackson, Tennessee, 
being in the employ of W. H. Coleman & Company, of Indianapolis. There 
were three children in his family: Charles, who died in childhood; Mrs. Viola 
McCarty, and John W., of this sketch. The father of these children is a 
Republican, and fraternally he belongs to the Masonic order, the Knights of 
Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

John W. Martin, of this review, spent his boyhood in Minnesota and 
he received his education in the common schools of that state. Early in life 
he entered the lumber business, in which he has remained, including handling 
lumber, timber and the heading business, and kindred pursuits, in all of which 
he has met with encouraging success. He has been connected with the same 
company as was his father. He came to Veedersburg from Indianapolis and 
has since operated a lumber yard here, enjoying an ever-growing trade, which 
now extends over a wide territory. He devotes all his attention to the lumber 
business, although he is the owner of two hundred acres of valuable and well 
improved land, all under a high state of cultivation. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 5II 

Mr. Martin was married on June \2, 1892, to Emma 0. Osborn, daugh- 
ter of Elijah B. Osborn and wife, a highly respected family, and this union 
has resulted in the birth of two children, Louis and Mildred. 

Politically, Mr. Martin is a Republican, but is not a biased partisan, be- 
lieving in placing the best men in office, holding principles above party. He 
has been a member of the city council at Veedersburg. He belongs to the 
Uniform Rank, Knights of Pythias. Religiously, he belongs to the Christian 
rhurch and is a trustee in the local congregation. 



ROBERT ALLEN McCORD. 

One of the influential business men of southern Fountain county is 
Robert Allen McCord, the present popular and efficient cashier of the Bank 
of Kingman, who, while yet young in years, has shown what may be accom- 
plished by the persevering and honest man who applies himself to legitimate 
lines of endeavor. He deserves much credit for what he has accomplished in 
the business world, having started in life with little assistance in any way, 
and he has gained a position of prominence in the community through his 
own unaided efforts, by hard work, good management and honorable deal- 
ings with his fellow men, the attributes having been backed up by sound 
common sense, which always brings tangible results when properly applied. 
And because of his industry, honesty and public spirit, and his loyalty to all 
movements looking to the good of the locality where he lives, Mr. McCord is 
highly respected by all who know him. 

Robert A. McCord was born in Warren county, Indiana, May 4, 1883. 
He is a son of Joseph H. and Mary Adildia (Hall) McCord, of Adams town- 
ship, Warren county, long one of the leading families of that community. 
The subject grew to manhood in his native county, and he received his edu- 
cation in the common schools and high school at Pine Village, and thereafter 
engaged in farming and stock raising, making a pronounced success from 
the start. In June, 1909, he turned his attention from the active pursuits of 
farming and entered the Bank of Kingman as assistant cashier, to learn the 
banking business. He made rapid progress, and since 1910 he has been em- 
ployed as cashier of that sound and popular institution, and is still discharging 
the duties of the position in a manner that reflects much credit upon himself 
and to the eminent satisfaction of the stockholders and patrons. He also 
finds time for other lines of endeavor, and has an interest in the grain eleva- 



512 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

tor at the town of Yeddo, also does considerable insurance business, and he 
looks after his fine farm in this county, on which he keeps an excellent grade 
of live stock. 

Politically, Mr. McCord is a Republican, and, fraternally, he belongs to 
the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons and the Order of the Eastern Star. 
He is a deacon in the Christian church. 

November 16, 1910, Mr. McCord was united in marriage with Gertrude 
M. Glasscock, daughter of Henry and Fannie O. Glasscock, one of the best 
known families of Fountain county. 

The Bank of Kingman was incorporated in 1891 with a capital stock of 
ten thousand dollars, with R. A. Booe as president, and E. S. Booe as vice- 
president and cashier. The present officers are E. S. Booe, president ; Henry 
Glasscock, vice-president; R. A. McCord, cashier. They carry on a general 
banking business, and the present assets are $105,000; deposits, $94,000. 



JOHN A. DAGGER. 



This prominent citizen and successful business man comes of good old 
Revolutionary stock, and ever since his birth, more than three quarters of a 
century ago, he has been an honored resident of Fountain county. The Dag- 
ger family is of Swiss origin, but was early represented in the. United States 
by Peter Dagger, the subject's grandfather, who served three years in the 
Revolutionary war and participated in a number of battles and minor engage- 
ments. Charles B. Dagger, son of Peter and father of the subject, was a 
native of Virginia and an early settler of Fountain county, Indiana, moving 
here in 1830 and dying six years later. His wife, Mary Waskey, in early 
life lived near the Natural Bridge, Virginia, having been a native of that 
state. She survived her husband a number of years, departing this life at a 
ripe old age in 1880. The family of this estimable couple consisted of three 
children, Virginia, who married Samuel Kerr, both deceased; Caroline, died 
aged thirty years, and John A., of this review. 

John A. Dagger was born December 22, 1836, in the woods of Fountain 
county, Indiana, and grew up amid the stirring scenes and active duties of the 
pioneer period. He recalls the time when the country was almost a wilderness 
and wild game of every kind was abundant and easily obtained. As soon 
as old enough to be of service, he was put to work, clearing land and fitting it 
for cultivation, and while still a youth in his teens he was able to do a man's 




JOHN A. DAGGER. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 513 

part at almost, any kind of physical labor. Owing to the lack of school 
facilities his early education was somewhat limited, but, possessing a strong 1 
and inquiring mind and a natural taste for books and study, he has since made 
up for this deficiency and for years has been considered the best informed 
man of his community. Mr.' Dagger's "reading has taken a very wide range, 
his knowledge being both general and profound. He has been a careful stu- 
dent of American history and his 1 perusal of all the leading up-to-date papers, 
magazines and other periodicals has enabled him to become thoroughly versed 
in political matters and today there are few men as familiar with the questions 
and issues before the people as he. A Democrat in politics, he votes from 
principle and, believing in the mission of his party, he has ever given it an 
earnest and uncompromising support. With the courage of his convictions, 
he is fearless in the expression of his opinions, and he arrives at conclusions 
only after mature and thoughtful consideration. His knowledge being appre- 
ciable by his fellow citizens, he has naturally become a party leader in his 
part of the county, and it is not too much to say that few men in the county 
exercise as great influence in moulding thought and directing public opinion 
as he. 

Mr. Dagger early turned his attention to agriculture and for many years 
he has been among the prosperous farmers of Fountain county. His landed 
interests at this time are large and valuable, his farm of two hundred and twen- 
ty acres in Richland township being admirably situated, well drained and con- 
taining one hundred and forty acres of fine tillable soil, the remainder con- 
sisting of timber and pasturage. In connection with general farming he has 
achieved an enviable reputation as a breeder and raiser of live stock, his cattle 
and hogs being of the best grades and commanding the highest prices in the 
local and general markets. Mr. Dagger believes in devoting his material 
wealth to judicious purposes, and to this end he has been unsparing in the 
improvement of his farm, and beautifying and making attractive a home which- 
has long been considered among the finest country residences in the^ township 
of Richland. 

In addition to farming and raising of live stock, Mr. Dagger has large 
and important interests in other lines, being a business man of high standing 
and an influential factor in the financial circles of Mellott and other places. 
He was a leading spirit in organizing the Bank of Mellott in 1901, ever since 
which time he has held the responsible position of president, and it is needless 
to state that the success of the enterprise is largely due to his judicious meth- 
ods and wise management. He is also a director of the Fountain County 

(33) 



514 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Trust Company in Covington, in which he has a large amount of stock, and 
that institution is likewise indebted to him for much of the prosperity which 
it now enjoys. 

Mr. Dagger has been an honored member of the Masonic brotherhood 
for a period of forty years, during which time he has risen to high rank in 
the order, being at this time one of the' oldest members of Lodge No. 205, 
at Newtown. In every relation of life his conduct has been upright and honor- 
able, his success much greater than that which attends the majority, and it is 
a compliment worthily bestowed to classify him with the notable men of his 
day and generation in Fountain county. He was married on January 18, 1883, 
to Elizabeth Clark, daughter of Scott D. Clark, a mechanic of Newtown, the 
union being without issue. 



JAMES C. CLAYPOOL. 

When recording the history of a community the historian can not men- 
tion the lives of all who have there lived and died, but only of those who have 
stood out prominently from the rest, and by their ability to bring success for 
themselves, and to help their fellow men with whom they come in contact, 
have rendered their lives the proper subject of chronicle for future genera- 
tions. Such a one is James C. Claypool, one of the large land-owners and 
leaders of affairs in Shawnee township. He was born on the old homestead 
in Shawnee township, March 31, 1851, the son of Abel and Melissa (Hetfield) 
Claypool. 

Abel Claypool was born in 1801 in Ross county, Ohio, attended school 
there, and taught school for several terms. In 1824 he moved from Schooley's 
Station, Ross county, Ohio, to Fountain county, Indiana, and entered part of 
the land where his son James C. now lives. He followed farming and stock 
raising and was very successful, for the stock from the Woodlawn Stock 
Farm, as it was then known, had a reputation among buyers. In politics he 
was a Whig and a Republican, and was a representative in the Legislature in 
the fifties. He died in 1872, His wife was born in 1818, and died in 1868. 
Her father, Adam S. Hetfield, built the first brick house in Shawnee town- 
ship. In his day Abel Claypool was among the most influential citizens of the 
community, his ability and attainments commanding respect, and his opinion 
carrying much weight. He was the father of six children, Byron, Mar- 
garet, Ann B., James C, Melissa, and Abel, all of whom are deceased save 
James C. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 5I5 

James C. Claypool attended the common schools and the Attica high 
school. He spent one year at Wabash College, and then took up farming and 
stock raising, in which he has been far more than ordinarily successful. He 
owns a farm of six hundred and forty-five acres where he lives and one hun- 
dred and ten acres in the west part of the township. He also owns his grand- 
father's farm of two hundred and forty acres in Ross county, Ohio. The 
substantial and commodious house in which he lives was built the year of his 
birth. 

On November 14, 1876, Mr. Claypool was married to Angelica C. Odell, 
the daughter of Teletnachus Odell, of Odell's Corner. To this marriage 
were born seven children, of whom five arc alive, namely : Abel T., who mar- 
ried Carson Lemmon, is the parent of three children, Josephine C, Clara M. 
and Edward; Jessie; James Chester, who married Lily Burns, is the father of 
two children, Chester B. and Cecil ; Ed, who married Clara M. Canauzer ; and 
Edna, Ed's twin sister. Two children died in infancy. 

In politics, Mr. Claypool is a Republican. He was a representative in the 
state Legislature in 1876, and for three terms has served on the county coun- 
cil. He is one of the strong men of his county, and his farm might well serve 
as a model of modern and scientific management, its owner's abilities being 
reflected in the careful manner in which it is kept, and the large profits which 
it produces. 



ABNER HAL ANDRUS, M. D. 

Success in what are properly termed the learned professions is the legiti- 
mate result of merit and painstaking endeavor. In commercial life one may 
come into possession of a lucrative business through inheritance or grit, but 
professional advancement is gained only by critical study and consecutive 
research long continued. Proper intellectual discipline, thorough professional 
knowledge and the possession and utilization of the qualities and attributes 
essential to success have made Dr. Abner Hal Andrus, of Covington, Indiana, 
eminent in his chosen calling and, although he has been a resident of Fountain 
county but a few years, he stands today among the scholarly and enterprising 
general physicians in a community long distinguished for the high order of its 
medical talent. 

Dr. Andrus was born in F anklin county, Ohio, May 5, 1862. He is the 
son of Abner and Mary (Westervalt) Andrus, natives of New York, from 
which state they came to Ohio when young and there became well established 
through their industry, being leaders in the affairs of their community. 



516 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Receiving his early education in the public schools of his native com- 
munity where he grew to manhood, Dr. Andrus later entered Otterbein Uni- 
versity at Westerville, Ohio, where he completed his literary education. Hav- 
ing decided on a medical career early in life, he began bending his efforts in 
that dirction, and after the usual preliminary preparations Dr. Andrus entered 
Starling College of Medicine at Columbus, Ohio, in 1884, where he made a 
splendid record, and from this institution he was graduated with the class of 
1886. Soon thereafter he began the practice of his profession at Caldwell, 
Ohio, being successful from the first and soon enjoying a lucrative patronage 
in that vicinity. Seeking a wider field for the exercise of his talents, he went 
to Zanesville, that state, where he was successfully engaged in the practice for 
seven years. He then came to Covington, Indiana, where he has since re- 
mained and he now ranks with the leading men of his field of endeavor in this 
locality. He has remained a close student of all that pertains to his calling 
and has therefore kept well abreast of the times and has met with a large 
measure of success as a general practitioner. 

Dr. Andrus was married, first, in September, 1887, to Clara Franken- 
burg, of Columbus, Ohio, which union resulted in the birth of two children, 
Kenneth,- a graduate of- Purdue University, and Ernest, who is attending the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons in Chicago. The wife and mother was 
called to her rest in June, 1895, and on November 23, 1896, Dr. Andrus was 
united in marriage with Lucy Nulton, of Beverly, Ohio, where her family 
has long been well known. 

Dr. .Andrus is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Politically, 
he is a Republican, but has never been specially active in public affairs, pre- 
ferring to devote his exclusive attention to his profession. Fraternally, he 
belongs to the Masonic order and the Knights of Pythias. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Ohio Medical Society and formerly belonged to the American 
Medical Association. He is a very companionable gentleman, straightfor- 
ward and honorable in all his relations with his fellow men. 



EDWARD PATTON. 

Fountain county furnished the home for many a pioneer who settled 
within its boundaries with no capital save the intelligence and physical abilities 
that were the gifts of his Maker and later attained a competency and a position 
of influence in the locality in which he chose to reside that, in after years, re- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. • 5 T 7 

dounded in an enviable reputation for himself and descendants. Among the 
old and honored pioneers were the forebears of the subject of this sketch. 

Edward Patton, the present popular and efficient postmaster at Veeders- 
burg, Indiana, was born nedr this town, on the old homestead, settled by his 
paternal grandfather, Thomas Patton, who, in 1823, entered government 
land, at which time there were only two other families in Fountain county. 
The Pattons came here from Parke county, but were originally from Virginia 
and wen; of Scotch-Irish descent. The country was indeed a wilderness 
when they began hewing out a farm from the dense forest in the midst of 
which they settled, and they endured all the hardships and privations incident 
to life on the frontier. Here they spent their lives engaged in general farm- 
ing, and were influential in the early development of the county. 

Thomas Patton married Nancy Hendry and to them six children were 
born, namely: David, William (father of the subject of this sketch), Silas: 
Annie, who married Solomon Hepfield; Psyche married Elijah Ehvell: Mar- 
garet married Robert Mitchell. 

William Patton was born in Parke county-, Indiana, in 1821, and was only 
two and a half years old when he accompanied his parents to Fountain county 
in 1823. Here he grew to manhood and assisted in clearing and getting the 
place under cultivation. After six months schooling he followed farming the 
rest of his life and was one of the leading agriculturists of this locality in his 
day and generation, having accumulated seven hundred acres of valuable 
land. He was a man of good business judgment and exemplary character and 
was well liked by all who knew him and that included most everyone in the 
county. His death occurred in 1906, at the advanced age of eighty-five years. 
He married Deborah Kepner, and. they became the parents of eight children, 
five of whom are living, namely: Volney is farming on the old homestead; 
Sarah married Albert Hershberger, a farmer living in California; Nancy P. 
married Dr. Pettit, of Veedersburg; Edward, subject of this sketch; Morton 
is farming on the old homestead ; Francis, Marion and May are deceased. 

William Patton, the father of the above named children, was a Presby- 
terian, and was a deacon in the local church for many years. He was a Whig 
early in life and later an Abe Lincoln Republican. Pie belonged to the 
Masonic order. 

Edward Patton, of this sketch, grew to manhood on the home farm in 
this county and there he assisted with the general work when of proper age. 
He received his educational training in the common schools, after which he 
took up contracting, building highways and other public improvement work, 
which he still follows, being one of the best known contractors in this and 



5l8 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

adjoining counties, his work having always been honestly and well done, giv- 
ing eminent satisfaction in every respect. Having long manifested an abiding 
interest in public affairs, he was appointed postmaster at Veedersburg in 
1907 and he is now serving his second term, giving eminent satisfaction to the 
department and the people. 

Mr. Patton was married on November 9, 1888, to Belle M. Mitchell, 
daughter of Robert and Anne (Middlebrook) Mitchell. To this union one 
son has been born, Robert William Patton, a traveling salesman. 

Politically, Mr. Patton is a Republican, and he has ever been most loyal 
in supporting his party's principles. Religiously, he is a member of the Presby- 
terian church and a deacon in the same. Fraternally, he belongs to the 
Masonic order, the Order of the Eastern Star, and the Knights of Pythias, 
being one of the charter members of the latter, and he also belongs to the 
Commercial Club. 



LEE PHILPOTT. 

An enumeration of those men of the present generation who have won 
honor and public recognition for themselves, and at the same time have hon- 
ored the locality to which they belong, would be incomplete were there failure 
to make mention of the one whose name forms the caption to this sketch. He 
has sustained a very enviable reputation in official circles and today is ably 
and satisfactorily discharging the duties of deputy treasurer of Fountain 
county. 

• Before reviewing the personal record of Mr. Philpott, it will be conson- 
ant to enter record concerning his paternal ancestry, as follows : 

(I) About the year 1730 Charles Philpott and Elizabeth Philpott, his 
wife, residents of Gloucester county in England, emigrated to America and 
landed at a place called Benedict, in Charles county, Maryland. They settled 
on a stream called Allen's Fresh, seven or eight miles from Port Tobacco, in 
that county. Charles Philpott died about the year 1740, his widow surviving 
him some fifteen or twenty years. They were the parents of three sons, John, 
Barton and William, and four daughters, Eleanor, Elizabeth, Susan and Mary. 

(II) William, the third son of Charles and Elizabeth Philpott, moved 
from Charles county to Frederick county, Maryland. He settled on Bennett's 
creek, near the foot of Sugar Loaf mountain, and died there about the year 
1776. His wife's maiden name was Mary Ann Davis. Their children were 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 5I9 

William, Barton, John, Jose, Elizabeth, Sarah, Rebecca and Anna. During 
the war of the Revolution a detachment of Cornwallis' army camped in the 
neighborhood of Sugar Loaf mountain, in Frederick county, and the British 
soldiers ruthlessly destroyed everything that belonged to the widow and chil- 
dren of William Philpott; so, about the close of the Revolutionary war, the 
living children, together with their mother, removed from Frederick county to 
the state of North Carolina, all excepting (III) John, who continued on to 
South Carolina with a planter named Harris, and settled near a little town 
called Pendleton, in Anderson district. John afterwards married Lucy, the 
daughter of Mr. Harris, and in 1811 or 1812 moved from South Carolina to 
Barren county, Kentucky, where he remained until 1814, when he moved to 
Fayette county, Indiana. His wife died in 181 6 and in due time he married 
Mrs. Hannah van Horn, with whom he lived until 1843, when he died. The 
names of his children were William, Stephen, John, Louisa, Lucinda and 
Harris. 

(IV) Stephen Philpott married Rebecca Hawkins, of Fayette county, 
Indiana, and their children were John, Benjamin, James, William and a 
daughter, Celia. 

(V) John Philpott, the grandfather of the immediate subject of this 
sketch, moved from Fayette county, Indiana, to Jackson township, Fountain 
county, in a very early day. He married "Polly" Swaim and they were the 
parents of the following named children: Francis, Clarinda, Jane, Cassinda, 
Jasper N., subject's father, Delcina and Joseph. He followed farming 
through life. 

(VI) Jasper N. Philpott, the subject's father, was born in Fountain 
county, Indiana, and during all his active years he followed agricultural pur- 
suits in Jackson township. He was a prominent and influential citizen of his 
community and took an active part in local affairs, having served his township 
one term as assessor. He was a Democrat in his political faith, as were his 
ancestors. His wife, whose maiden name was Sarah J. Livingston, was a 
native of Pennsylvania. They became the parents of three children, namely: 
Ida C. became the wife of Ira E. Wilkinson and they reside at Wallace, this 
county; Bertha J. is the wife of H. C. Wilkinson, also of Wallace; Lee is the 
immediate subject of this sketch. 

(VII) Lee Philpott first saw the light of day in Jackson township, 
Fountain county, on January 23, 1874. He was reared under the parental 
roof and secured his education in the public schools and in Wabash College. 
He has mainly followed farming during his active years, never having held 



520 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

public office until his selection as deputy county .treasurer, the duties of which 
position he is discharging iii a manner that has won him the commendation 
.of his fellow officials and the public alike. From 1892 to 1900 he was en- 
gaged in teaching school. He entered the. treasurer's office in 1910 and his 
term will expire in 1914. 

On March 22, 1900, Mr. Philpott was united in marriage with Tessa 
Roberts, the daughter of Albert C. and Rachel E. (Fine) Roberts, the father 
a native of Ohio, and the mother a member of one of the fine old pioneer fam- 
ilies of Fountain county. 

Politically, Mr. Philpott is a Democrat and takes a live interest in the 
success of his party. Fraternally, he is a member of the Masonic order, hold- 
ing membership in Blue Lodge No. 495, at Wallace, this county, and in Chap- 
ter No. 93, Royal Arch Masons, at Covington. He also belongs to Camp No. 
9845, Modern Woodmen of America. His religious membership is with the 
Disciples church. Mr. Philpott has always been interested in the progress of 
his native county and the development of its resources, and gives his assistance 
and influence to all laudable men and measures to further these ends. He 
possesses a forceful personality .and is well liked by all who know him. 



VIRGIL C. FRAZIER. 

He to whom this sketch is dedicated is a member of one of the oldest 
and most honored pioneer families of Fountain county, Indiana, and he has 
personally lived up to the full tension of the primitive days when was here 
initiated the march of civilization, so that there is particular interest attached 
to his career, while he stands today as one of the representative citizens of 
Cain township, for his life has been one of hard work which has resulted in 
the development of a good farm which he owns and which yields him a com- 
fortable living. He is held in the highest respect by all, owing to his exemplary 
habits, his industry and public spirit. 

Virgil C. Frazier was born in Cain township, Fountain county, Decem- 
ber 8, 1869, and there he grew to manhood- on the home farm where he made 
himself useful during his boyhood and in the winter months he attended the 
common schools in his vicinity. He is a son of William and Mary Ann 
(VanGundy) Frazier, both born and reared in Fountain county, and here they 
were married and devoted their lives to agricultural pursuits, and they were 
the parents of eleven children, named as follows : David lives in Boulder, 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 521 

Colorado; Josiah lives in Cain township; Roswell, a farmer of Tazewell 
count)', Illinois; George is deceased; Austin makes his home in Los Angeles, 
California; Druzilla'.married John Doty and they live in Denver; Albert is 
farming in Benton county, Indiana; Eli is deceased; Estella married Levi 
Livengood, and they live on a farm in Cain township; Virgil C, of this sketch; 
Duly P., a farmer of Cain township, a sketch of whom will be found in this 
volume. 

The father of the above named children died in 1893, at t' 16 a g e of 
seventy-three years, and the mother passed away in 1895 when seventy-two 
years old. 

Virgil C. Frazier has remained on the old homestead where he is still 
successfully engaged in general fanning and stock raising, being the owner 
of three hundred and fifty acres, all under cultivation and excellent improve- 
ments. He has managed the old place with such skill that it has retained 
its original fertility and has yielded him a neat annual income. He has long 
handled an excellent grade of live stock and makes a specialty of full-blood 
Shropshire sheep. He has a fine, modernly appointed residence, and a sub- 
stantial group of outbuildings, everything about the place denoting thrift and 
good management. 

... Mr. Frazier was married on December 31, 1893, to Gertrude M. Shade, 
daughter of Simon Shade, a well known Fountain county citizen. 

Mr. Frazier is a Republican, a member of the Christian church, and a 
trustee in the same. Fraternally, he belongs to the Free and Accepted Masons, 
Royal Arch Masons, Knights of Pythias, and the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 



CHARLES M. SPENCER. 

It is a pleasure to investigate the career of a successful, self-made man. 
Peculiar honor attaches to that individual who, beginning the great struggle 
of life alone or practically unaided, gradually overcomes unfavorable environ- 
ment, removes one by one the obstacles from his pathway to success and by 
the force of his own individuality succeeds in forging his way to the front 
and winning for himself a position of esteem and influence among his fellow 
men. Such is the record, briefly stated, of the popular and well known furni- 
ture dealer and undertaker of Kingman, Fountain county, to a brief synopsis 
of whose life and characteristics the following paragraphs are devoted, who 
while but a young man showed himself to be able to successfully compete 
with all classes of men in the business world. 



522 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Charles M. Spencer was born in Worthington, Ohio, June 16, 1842. He 
is the son of John W. and Irene (Didrick) Spencer, natives of Virginia and 
New York, respectively. The father came to Indiana in an early day, locating 
in Fayette county, where he followed the trade of cabinet-maker, which he 
taught all his sons. He moved to Harveysburg, March 4, 1857, and followed 
his trade for fifteen years, then moved to Saybrook, Illinois, but later returned 
to Harveysburg, where he died in 1883, at the age of seventy-six years. His 
wife died at the home of her son, Charles M., of this sketch, in March, 1904. 
Nine children were born to John W. Spencer and wife, namely: Charles M., 
of this review ; William, Theodore, Francis, Margaret, Dewitt, Richard, Juliet 
and Geraldine, all of whom are deceased but the subject. The father of the 
above named children was a Democrat, a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Charles M. Spencer attended the public schools until he was twelve years 
of age, then was apprenticed to learn the cabinet-maker's trade, at which he 
worked for seven years. On August 20, 1861, he left the bench, ran away 
and enlisted in Company A, Thirty-first Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He was 
mustered in at Terre Haute, and was honorably discharged at Chattanooga, 
Tennessee, September 15, 1864, having been a most faithful soldier for the 
Union, and he had participated in the following engagements : Fort Donelson 
and battle of Shiloh two days; Perrysville, Kentucky, then made the return 
trip to Nashville. Here he was taken out of his regiment in October, 1862, 
and" put into the "Pioneer Brigade" under James St. Clair Morton. This 
was formed at Nashville and he was with this body of noted fighting men at 
the great battle of Stone's River, or Murfreesboro, .three days; then went to 
Chattanooga, and was in the battle there, then fought at Lookout Mountain 
and Missionary Ridge, later being mustered out as stated above. 

On September 20, 1864, Mr. Spencer returned home, Harveysburg, and 
resumed work at his trade, at the same bench he had left to take up his musket 
in defense of the flag, and he used the same apron and tools that he formerly 
used. In 1887 he moved to Kingman, where he has since been engaged in the 
furniture and undertaking business, enjoying the distinction of being the old- 
est undertaker, in point of service, in Fountain county. He has built up an 
extensive and lucrative business in the southern part of the county, and has 
long been rated as one of Kingman's foremost business men and citizens. 

Mr. Spencer was married, first, on January 1, 1865, to Sylvani Sowers, 
daughter of Alfred Sowers, an early settler of Fountain county, and to this 
union the following children were born : James, deceased ; Edward and Clara 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 523 

are also both deceased; William lives in Chicago; Oscar is working for his 
father; Gilbert is in the drygoods and grocery business in Kingman; Nellie 
died in infancy; Augusta May married Wesley Black. The wife and mother 
passed away in the spring of 1882, and in the year 1887 Mr. Spencer married 
Mary E. Morris, of Parke county. 

Mr. Spencer is a Prohibitionist, very active and is pronounced in his 
views. He was formerly a member of the Knights of Pythias and the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. He is a man of blameless character, genial' 
disposition and has a host of warm friends. 



WILLIAM R. GREENLEY. 

It is proper to judge of the success and the status of a man's life by the 
estimation in which he is held by his fellow citizens. They see him at his 
work, in his family circle, in his church, hear his views on public questions, 
observe the outcome of his code of morals, witness how he conducts himself 
in all the relations of society and civilization and thus become competent to 
judge of his merits and demerits. After a long course of years of such 
observation it would be out of the question for his neighbors not to know his 
worth, because, as has been said, "Actions speak louder than words." In 
this community there is nothing heard concerning the subject of this sketch but 
good words. He has passed so many years here that his worth is well known, 
but it will be of interest to run over the busy events of his life in these pages. 

William R. Greenley was born in Van Buren township, Fountain county, 
Indiana, on April 10, 1832, and thus his long life of more than eight decades 
has been spent in the same neighborhood. His parents were Francis and 
Vintentia (Riley) Greenley, who came to this state from Ohio, in 1831. The 
father, who was a native of New York state, was of English ancestry, while 
the mother's antecedents were from Ireland. Francis Greenley was the first 
doctor in Fountain county and the greater part of his practice was, of course, 
over a widely scattered territory, necessitating man)' long, tiresome and, 
oftimes, dangerous trips through the woods, over bridgeless streams, day or 
night, as the case might be, his faithful horse being his only traveling com- 
panion. His death occurred in 1834. His brother Orsamus was the first 
white man to die in Fountain county, his death occurring in 1825. Francis 
and Vintentia Greenley were the parents of two children, Orsamus, now de- 
ceased, and William, the subject of his sketch. 



524 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

William Greenley received his education in the common schools, which at 
that early day were rather primitive in both methods and equipment, though 
it cannot be gainsaid that the lessons taught, such as they were, were well 
learned. When old enough Mr. Greenley applied himself to fanning, to 
which he devoted himself continuously until 1909, when he retired from 
active labor and moved to Veedersburg, where he now resides. Mr. Greenley 
owned two hundred and eighty-three acres of land, but upon his retirement he 
sold one hundred and twenty acres of this. He kept his farm at all times in 
good condition and few farms in Van Buren township excelled his in appear- 
ance or productivity. 

On February 3, 1856, Mr. Greenley was married to Adeline Hershberger, 
the daughter of Abraham and Elizabeth (Boblet) Hershberger. Her parents 
were natives of Virginia and came to Indiana in 1829, buying a tract of gov- 
ernment land for which they paid one dollar and a quarter per acre, the land 
lying in Van Buren township. They were the parents of thirteen children, 
of which number Mrs. Greenley is the only survivor. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Greenley have been born three children, namely: Vintentia is the wife of 
Freeman Dice, of Van Buren township, this county; Stanley, who died at the 
age of thirty years, and Ira, who died at the age of eighteen months. Stan- 
ley married Ida A. Bonebrake, of Mill Creek township, and they had four 
children, Myrtle, Lizzie, Vera and Grethel. 

Mr. Greenley has always shown a deep interest in the general welfare of 
his locality and, though never a seeker after office, he served the community 
one term as justice of the peace. His religious membership is with the United 
Brethren church, of which he has long been a faithful and devoted member, 
giving of his time and means to its support. In the strictest sense of the word 
he is a self-made man and is deserving of the high esteem which he enjoys. 



GEORGE W. DIFFENDERFER. 

For a period of sixty-seven years George W. Diffenderfer, a well known 
agriculturist of Fountain county, now living retired, has made his home in 
our midst, and during that period he has witnessed a wonderful transforma- 
tion in this community, taking a conspicuous part in the same. If one is in- 
terested in the early history of the county and likes to hear contrasted the 
modes and customs of living between that remote time and the present, he 
could not spend an hour more pleasantly or profitably than by listening to the 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 525 

subject's reminiscences. He came here when a boy of about seven years and 
thus grew up with the country and has been by no means an idle spectator of 
its upbuilding, and he has led such a life of honesty, sobriety and industry as 
to enjoy all the while the respect of all who have had occasion to know him 
either personally or by reputatioh. He has been quick to adopt the advanced 
methods of farming and has therefore been successful and now, as the twi- 
light of life gathers about him, he is permitted to spend his time in quiet, 
enjoying the fruits of his earlier years of toil and economy, meriting a respite. 

Mr. Diffenderfer was born in Circleyille, Ohio, October 23, 1838. He 
is the son of Gottlieb and Mary Ann (Rogers) Diffenderfer, the father hav- 
ing been a baker by trade, and he removed his family from Ohio to Covington, 
Indiana, in 1845, establishing the first bakery here, having made the long 
trip overland from the Buckeye state, in a covered wagon and five horses. 
They found here a straggling frontier village and a thinly settled country 
round about, but they believed in its future and so established their permanent 
home here. The father of the subject kept a bakery and grocery store here 
until 185 1, then purchased one hundred and ninety acres of land which he im- 
proved and on which he spent the rest of his life engaged in general farming, 
his death occurring in 1875, at the age of sixty-five years. His widow sur- 
vived thirty-five years, dying in 1910 at the ripe old age of ninety-one years. 
They became the parents of ten children, five of whom are living, namely : 
George W., of this review; Mrs. Jane Hegley, of Covington; Samuel, who 
lives in Wabash township ; David and Katy both live in Covington. 

George W. Diffenderfer grew to manhood in Fountain county- and he 
received his education in the common schools of Troy township and Coving- 
ton. He took up farming for a livelihood when young and this has been his 
life work. He was superintendent of the county farm from 1873 to J 876, 
filling the position in a manner that reflected much credit upon himself and 
to the eminent satisfaction of all concerned. He is the owner of a well im- 
proved and productive farm of one hundred and sixty acres, and is now liv- 
ing retired. 

On October 18, 1866, Mr. Diffenderfer was united in marriage with 
Mary E. DeHaven, daughter of Jacob DeHaven and wife, a highly respected 
old family of this county. Mrs. Diffenderfer was born January 3, 1848, and 
died July 6, 1906. To this union three children were born, namely: Charles, 
who died when fifteen months old; Ed, born at the county house, lives in 
Covington, married Katie Conover, who is now deceased, and to them 
three children were born, Grace, George and Harry; George Clifford, young- 
est of the subject's children, lives at Elcampo, Texas; he is a mechanic by 
trade. 



526 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Politically, Mr. Diffenderfer is a Democrat and, fraternally, he belongs 
to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Rebekahs. His father was 
one of the oldest members of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, was a 
trustee and steward in the Methodist Episcopal church, and was also a Demo- 
crat and was at one time assessor of his township. 



NOAH MARION, TEEGARDEN. 

Specific mention is made of many of the worthy citizens of Fountain 
county within the pages of this book, citizens who have figured in the growth 
and development of this favored locality and whose interests are identified 
with its every phase of progress, each contributing in his sphere of action to 
the well being of the community in which he resides and to the advancement 
of its normal and legitimate growth. Among this number is Noah Marion 
Teegarden, of Veedersburg, one of the leading attorneys and business men 
of Fountain county, peculiar interest attaching to his career from the fact 
that his entire useful and busy life has been spent within the borders of this 
county, he being the scion of one of our worthiest old families, the escutcheon 
of whose honored name he has ever kept untarnished. The genealogical rec- 
ord of the Teegarden family is as follows: 

(I) Abraham Teegarden, who was born in Prussia in 1688. 

(II) Abraham Teegarden, Jr., who was born in Prussia in 17 18, and, 
in company with his father, emigrated to the New World, landing at Phila- 
delphia on September 1, 1736. He married Lady Mary Parker, of Maryland, 
but who was born in England. They made their home in Philadelphia and 
became the parents of six sons and a daughter, among whom were Abraham, 
William, Thomas and Moses, all of whom served in the war of the Revolu- 
tion, and Susan, who became the wife of Colonel Shyrock, of Revolutionary 
fame. 

(III) Moses. Teegarden and his five sons were born in Pennsylvania. 
They emigrated westward, he stopping in Ohio and his sons continuing to In- 
diana, locating, George and Jacob in Fountain county in 1829, Abraham and 
Huston in Orange county, while William, who went to the northern part of 
the state, established what is known as Teegarden Station, on the Baltimore 
& Ohio railroad. 

(IV) Jacob, one of those who located in Fountain county, married a 
Miss McGee, and they became the parents of nine children, one of whom was 
(V) David. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 527 

(V) David married Martha Jarred, who was the thirtieth of a family 
of thirty-one children horn to her father by two marriages. They were farm- 
ing people of Mill Creek township, this county, where the grandfather entered 
a homestead. Among their children was John R. Teegarden, father of the 
immediate subject of this sketch. 

(VI) John R. Teegarden was born in Fountain county, Indiana, Jan- 
uary 20, 1846, and was reared on the home place and educated in the old log 
school house, with greased paper windows, puncheon floors and open fire- 
place, on Prairie creek, in Wabash township. He devoted his life to agricul- 
tural pursuits, becoming one of the leading farmers of his vicinity. On De- 
cember 14, 1864, he enlisted in Company F, Seventy-second Indiana Volun- 
teer Infantry, in the famous Wilder's Brigade. He was subsequently trans- 
ferred to Company D, Forty-fourth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was in 
engagements at Grace Springs, Alabama; Buzzard Roost, Selma and Mont- 
gomery. He entered the service as a recruit and was sent at once to the 
front and served nine months very creditably without drilling a day, and he 
was honorably discharged on September 14, 1865. 

After the war Mr. Teegarden returned home and resumed farming. On 
Deceml>er 10, 1872, he was united in marriage with Huldah Deer, daughter 
of Uriah and Elizabeth (Long) Deer, natives of Kentucky and Virginia, 
respectively. To this union six children were born, namely : Burt E. ; Noah 
M., subject of this sketch; David R. ; Cassius C. ; Daisy Myrtle, who married 
Alvin Edwards, a carpenter; Emma May, the youngest of the children, has 
been twice married, first to Claude Beeson, to which union one son was born, 
Fay D. Beeson; her second marriage was with Glenn Myers. 

John R. Teegarden is a Democrat and a member of the Masonic order. 
He is the owner of a fine farm of three hundred and twenty acres, all under 
cultivation and well improved, which land lies in Mill Creek township; he 
owns forty acres in Fulton township, also two hundred and fifty-two acres in 
Parke county. In connection with general farming, he raises live stock of a 
superior grade, trotting and draft horses, cattle, hogs, etc., which, owing to 
their fine qualities, find a very ready market. 

(VII) Noah M. Teegarden was born on what is known as the "Milk 
and Honey Farm," near Kingman, Fountain county, June 28, 1876, and 
there he grew to manhood. He received his early education in the common 
schools, and when fifteen years of age entered the Indiana Normal College at 
Covington, finishing his education in the Terre Haute State Normal in 1895. 
He then took a course in bookkeeping and commercial law in Crawfords- 
ville. He began his active business career by working on the farm one year, 



528 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

also dealt in timber three years. Then for two years he was in the real estate, 
loan and insurance business at Waveland. He spent the next two years in 
traveling in the West and in working on the home farm, then came to the 
town of Veedersburg in 1905 and engaged in the loan and insurance business. 
On March 19, 1906, he was admitted to practice law in the county courts, and 
on March 4, 1909, he was admitted to the supreme court, and he has since 
practiced law in Veedersburg and has also continued actively in loaning 
money. He has met with pronounced success in the varied lines lo which he 
has directed his energies and is now one of the substantial men of his locality, 
leader in the material, civic and moral affairs of his community, supporting- 
all measures looking toward the general upbuilding of the county of his 
nativity. ; 

Mr. Teegarden was married, .first, on September 26, 1899, to Laura 
Lotta Pickard, daughter of Frank and Eliza Pickard, of Waveland. Her 
death occurred on October 24, 1901. One child, Ruby, was born to this 
union. On October 29, 1905, Mr. Teegarden was united in marriage with 
Alice H. Hesler, daughter of Jacob and Lyda Annis (Davis) Hesler, of 
Fountain county, and to this union two children have been born, Lyda Imo- 
gene, born February 22, 1910, and Noah Marion, Jr., born December 1, 191 1 ; 
the last named died September 3, 19 12. 

In religious matters Mr. Teegarden is a member of the Christian church, 
a deacon and financial secretary of the ministerial and church erection funds. 
He is president of the Commercial Club, the success of which has been very 
largely due to his efforts, and he is a director in and the attorney for the Hub 
Savings & Loan Association. He was a candidate for prosecuting attorney in 
1910, and he was chairman of the temperance organization which led the 
fight against the liquor traffic in the election in March, 191 1. Fraternally, he 
belongs to the Masonic order. Personally, he is a genial, obliging and broad- 
minded gentleman who merits in every respect the high esteem in which he is 
universally held. 



GEORGE S. GLOVER. 

Among the earnest men whose enterprise and depth of character have 
gained a prominent place in the community and the respect and confidence of 
his fellow citizens is George S. Glover, well known clothing merchant of 
Veedersburg. He is a man of decided views and laudable ambitions, and his 
influence has ever been for the advancement of his kind and in the vocation to 




^^^^^^^^ 



s?rZ4/ 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 529 

which his energies are devoted lie ranks among our thriftiest young business 
men and is deserving of the large success which has attended his efforts. 

Mr. Glover has long been known as the leading man in any enterprise 
designed to promote the welfare and advancement of Veedersburg, and to him 
in a large measure is due the credit for the fine stone roads leading into the 
city, as well as other public improvements. He is considered one of the most 
public spirited men in Fountain county. 

Mr. Glover was born in Fountain county, Indiana, September 6, 1871, 
and is the son of William M. and Mary E. (Coffing) Glover, whose sketch 
appears elsewhere. George S. Glover received his education in the common 
schools of Covington, the Covington Normal College and the Terre Haute 
Normal. He worked on the farm until he was twenty-three years of age. 
He spent the next two years traveling in Texas and other states, taking and 
selling photographic views of residences. He is by nature a close observer 
and these travels were highly educational to him. He came to Veedersburg 
in March, 1898, and, in partnership with M. Herzog, entered the clothing 
business. In 1899, in partnership with W. B. Gray, he purchased Mr. Herzog's 
interest, and operated the business as the Fountain Clothing Company for three 
years. Since then, with the exception of one year, he has managed the busi- 
ness alone, opening a new store in 1904. He is also part owner of the Glover 
Dry Goods Company, operated by George S., VV. E. and B. F. Glover, doing 
a dry goods and grocery business, carrying a capital stock of fifteen thousand 
dollars and handling a large and complete line of goods, carefully selected and 
up-to-date at all seasons. This is one of the most popular and most extensively 
patronized stores of its kind in this section of the state. Its large success is 
due very largely to the able management and wide business discernment of the 
subject, who is a progressive, alert and careful business man and who has his 
affairs under a superb system, and here his thousands of customers always 
find courteous and honest treatment. In his own store, Mr. Glover handles 
clothing, gents furnishings, shoes, etc., keeping on hand a twelve thousand 
dollar stock. 

Mr. Glover was married on June 12, 1907, to Catherine Reed, daughter 
of Daniel and Sarah (Leatherman) Reed, of Newtown, and to this union one 
child has been born, Constance Glover, whose birth occurred on May 20, 1909. 

Mr. Glover has been very successful in a business way and besides his 
large mercantile interests he owns one hundred and sixty acres of well im- 
proved land, all under a good state of cultivation, and very favorably situated 
one mile west of Veedersburg. His beautiful residence in Veedersburg is 

(34) 



53° FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

worth three thousand and five hundred dollars. He also has stock to the 
amount of one thousand dollars in the Farmers State Bank, and is a member 
of the committee on loans. He is deserving of a great deal of credit for what 
he has accomplished, for he is a self-made man and has accumulated the 
handsome competency which is today his through his unaided efforts. Politi- 
cally, he is a Republican, and for three years was a school director. Fraternally, 
he belongs to the Masonic order, the Knights of Pythias and the Modern 
Woodmen of America. He is a stanch supporter of the principles of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is a trustee and secretary, and for the 
past five years has been superintendent of the Sunday school, and has taken 
an active part in church work. 



JOHN S. MARTIN. 

The record of the gentleman whose name introduces this sketch contains 
no exciti » chapters of tragic events, but is replete with well defined purposes 
which, carried to successful issue, won him an influential place in agricultural 
circles and a high personal standing among his fellow citizens. His life work 
was one of unceasing industry and perseverance and the systematic and honor- 
able methods which he followed resulted not only in getting the confidence of 
those with whom he had dealings, but also in the accumulation of a comfort- 
able competency. 

John S. Martin was born on June 6, 1829, in Miami county, Ohio, and 
was the son of Ephraim and Rhoda (Sayers) Martin, both of whom are de- 
ceased. To them were born ten children, all of whom are also deceased. The 
subject of this sketch was given the advantage of attendance at the common 
schools of his neighborhood, which, at that early day, were somewhat primi- 
tive in both equipment and method. He was reared to the life 1 of a farmer and 
to that line of work he consistently applied his efforts all his active years. His 
labors were rewarded with a fair measure of success and he gained a reputa- 
tion as one of the leading farmers of Fountain county. He was practical 
in his methods and energetic in his work, giving proper attention to every de- 
tail of the operation of the farm, the general appearance of which indicated 
him to be a man of good taste and sound judgment. 

On October 28, 1852, Mr. Martin was united in marriage with Ellen 
Meharey, who was born on March 24, 1833, the daughter of Thomas and 
Unity (Patton) Meharey, who lived about two miles north of Wingate, 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 53I 

Indiana. To Mr. and Mrs. Martin were born six children, namely: Rhoda 
Unity is the wife of A. C. Schermerhorn (see sketch elsewhere) ; Thomas, 
who is a farmer near Attica, married Elizabeth Fisher; Ida May. now Mrs. 
Kirkpatrick, living near Attica ; William died in infancy ; Jesse, who married 
Lydia Emily Thompson, is employed in a bank in Attica; Annette, deceased, 
was the wife of David Gardner. The death of the subject occurred on Janu- 
ary 27, 1903, and in his passing away the community suffered a distinct loss, 
for he was a man who had, because of his high personal qualities, endeared 
himself to a wide circle of friends. 

Politically, Mr. Martin was a stanch supporter of the Republican party, 
but was too busy with his own affairs to seek public office. His religious 
affiliation was with the Methodist Episcopal church, to which he gave liber- 
ally of his time and means. His life history was distinguished by the most 
substantial qualities of character and exhibited a long and virtuous career 
of private industry, performed with moderation and crowned with success, 
and his memory will long be revered by the people of this locality. 



ALLEN W. HELMS. 

It pays to make friends with nature, and the man who most dearly loves 
the soil seems to get the most out of it both in pleasure and remunerative 
harvests. Where the Wabash river drains the land of northern Fountain 
county, there are a number of beautiful farms, and one of the most highly 
cultivated of these is the property of Allen W. Helms, who loves every inch of 
his soil and has been rewarded by prosperity. He is one of the most prom- 
inent and influential men in Fountain county. 

Mr. Helms was born in Veedersburg, Indiana, February n, 1833. His 
father, George W. Helms, was the son of Thompson Helms, who settled near 
Wrightstown in 1823. Thompson Helms was of the" good old Kentucky 
stock, and came to Indiana to practice the arts of agriculture, which be had 
learned in his home state. He found a country in its primeval state, and his 
was the work of clearing off the forest, building the first house, and bringing 
the land to a high state of cultivation. His son also spent his life in Fountain 
county, farming on the place on which Allen W. Helms is now living. He 
married Eliza Kealing, the daughter of James Kealing, who came to this 
country from England, settling on a piece of land that is now incorporated in 
Veedersburg, Indiana. James Kealing was a man of fine education and 



532 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

taught school fur a while in Fountain county. His daughter naturally had the 
benefit of an unusual opportunity in educational lines. George W. Helms 
had four brothers, Elisha, William, San ford and Thompson. He died July 
25, 1847, ar >d his wife died in 189 1, at the age of eighty-six. They had eleven 
children, four of whom are living. George Washington lives in Van Bureri 
township. James Franklin is farming in \rkansas. Francis Marion is in 
the real estate business in Indianapolis, s d Allen W. Helms still lives in 
Fountain county. , -Riley, Oscar F., Guilford Hickman, Christopher, Amanda 
Melvina, Sarah Emeline and Eliza Jane are dead. 

Allen W. Helms was educated in the common schools in a little log cabin. 
There, with the other boys and the girls in the neighlwrhood, he sat on the 
hard puncheon- seats and studied the customary three R's. On the old home 
farm he learned lessons evidently of more value than the present day instruc- 
tion if one may judge by the results. After finishing school he commenced 
farming and has lived to see a great change in farming implements. When 
he was a boy the ground was broken with a shovel plow, only one horse was 
used, and other crude methods were in vogue. Now, on his farm the most 
modern methods are used. On March 24, 1857, ^ e married Zerelda Hetfield, 
daughter of Solomon Hetfield, who was one of the oldest settlers in this 
country, coming to Fountain county in 1827. They had four children. Oscar 
Andrew died in infancy, as did also Sarah Emeline. Zelnia Altea married 
Samuel Lafuse, a lawyer of Kingman, Indiana, who since his wife's death has 
gone to Kansas. For Frank Z. Helms, see the sketch in this work. Mrs. 
Zerelda Helms died March 26, 1891, and in January, 1894, he married Mary 
Purdue, daughter of Richard Purdue. They had three children, only one of 
whom, Elva Allen, is now living. 

Mr. Helms moved to his present location February 29, 1866, where he 
has one hundred and five acres, which he has brought to a high state of culti- 
vation. He is now practically retired, just living there to oversee the work, 
enjoy his home, and look after his other holdings. He owns some property 
^n Veedersburg and also has some shale lands. Mr. Helms is looked upon 
as one of the most influential men in his community. He is a member of the 
N'ew Light Christian church, which he helped build — in fact he did more in 
its erection than any other man. He is independent in politics, not being a 
slave to a political party, but rather voting for men and the principles which 
they exemplify. He is a type of the men who have made the state of Indiana 
grow, men of sound principles and the strength of their convictions, willing 
to lend their influence at all times to the cause of justice. He is a man for 
the generations to come to look back upon and admire. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 533 

ELLIOTT W. KIRK, M. D. 

It requires something more than a few years in a medical school to fit one 
for the successful practice of medicine nowadays, One must have proper 
innate attributes, such as fortitude, self-reliance, courage and initiative, an 
altruistic spirit and a gentlemanly address; coupled with these characteristics. 
.one must be a profound and untiring student, making everything else sub- 
servient to his vocation! The auspicious start Dr. Elliott YY. Kirk, of Veed- 
ersburg, Fountain county, has made in this line of endeavor would indicate 
that he is well fitted both by nature and training for the career of. a general 
practitioner of medicine and since establishing himself here he has met with 
encouraging success and the future for him is particularly bright'. 

Dr. Kirk was born at Robinson, II!. ois, April 13, 1874. He is the son 
of John and Emeline Victoria (Holmes) Kirk, natives of 'Newark, Ohio, and 
there the Doctor's father accompanied his parents to Illinois about 1850, and 
there over sixty years ago they established the family home when the wide, 
wild prairies were very sparsely settled. The mother of the subject moved 
from Ohio to Illinois about two years after the Kirks moved there, and there 
the Doctor's parents were married and engaged in farming. 

Seven children were born to John Kirk and wife, named as follows: 
Victor L., who lives in Robinson, Illinois; Elliott W.y of this review: Arthur 
is deceased; Allen J. P. is farming near Robinson, Illinois; Addie A., who 
married Ellsworth Tobin, a farmer living near Robinson, Illinois ; Enoch 
Leslie is deceased; Mary A. married Elmer Tobin, a farmer, and they live in 
Michigan. 

The father of the above named children was a Democrat, and, fraternal- 
ly, a Granger. He belonged to the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he 
was a steward. 

Dr. Kirk was reared on the home farm and he received his education in 
the common schools at Robinson, Illinois, later attended Wabash College,. 
Crawfordsville, Indiana, from which institution he was graduated in 1899. 
After finishing his college work he began the active duties of life by teaching 
in the high school at Veedersburg for two years. He then went to Nashville, 
Tennessee, where he held teaching fellowship in Vanderbilt University for 
three years. The first year he took post-graduate work, and the next two 
years he took the course in the medical department. He finished his last year 
in medicine in the Central College of Physicians and Surgeons at Indianapo- 
lis, Indiana, in 1905. 



534 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

After completing his course in medicine Dr. Kirk came to Veedersburg 
and began the practice of his profession and here he has continued to the pres- 
ent time with ever-increasing success, taking rank among the leading medical 
men of this section of the state and he now has a large and lucrative practice 
with the town and surrounding country. 

Dr. Kirk was married on May 6, 1905, to Maud Elizabeth Walker, 
daughter of I. J. Walker and wife, of Veedersburg, an excellent family here, 
and to this union two children have been born, Esther Marion, born March 
11, 1906, and Margaret Emeline, born August 10, 191 1. 

Politically, the Doctor is an independent Republican and, fraternally, he 
belongs to the Masonic order, the Order of the Eastern Star, the Modern 
Woodmen of America and the Royal Neighbors. He is a member of the 
Commercial Club at Veedersburg, also belongs to the Fountain and War- 
ren County Medical Society. Religiously, he is a member of the Christ- 
ian church and is treasurer of the local congregation. Hs is a young man of 
pleasing address and is popular with all classes. 



JOHN H. GRAY. 



Conspicuous among the representative farmers and business men of 
Fountain county is the well known and highly esteemed gentleman whose 
name introduces this sketch. Few men have done as much as he to promote 
the material interests of the township honored by his citizenship and it is 
with much satisfaction that the following brief review of his life and tribute 
to his worth is given a place in this volume. 

Daniel Gray, the subject's grandfather, was a native of Pennsylvania and 
by occupation a stone mason. He lived a number of years in the state of his 
birth, removing thence in an early day to Michigan, where he followed his 
trade for some time, subsequently migrating to Indiana, where he lived the 
remainder of his days. William Gray, son of Daniel and father of the sub- 
ject, was born in 1827, in Pennsylvania, and in 1852 came to Indiana and 
settled in Richland township, Fountain county, where he worked for a number 
of years at his trade of carpentry. Being a successful mechanic he never 
lacked employment and many of the dwellings, barns and other buildings in 
the township were the work of his hands, in addition to which he utilized his 
skill in the making of much of the furniture used by the early settlers, also 
farming implements, tools, etc., for which there was always a great demand. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 535 

In politics he was an old-line Whig, and as such wielded a strong influence 
for his party, kept in close touch with the times and was a man of keen, prac- 
tical intelligence, sound judgment and spotless integrity. Sarah Persing, wife 
of William Gray, was also a native of Pennsylvania, born in the year 1827. 
She was a woman of excellent character, a devoted wife and mother, and 
spared no pains in the rearing of her children and instilling into their minds 
and hearts the principles of rectitude to the end that they might grow up 
noble men and women and prove an honor to the family name. The oldest of 
the family was John H., the subject of this review, after whom were the 
following in the order indicated: Horace, bom in 185 1 ; Clara, in 1854; Edith, 
1858; and Mabel, whose birth occurred in the year i860. 

John H. Gray was born February 1, 1849, in Pennsylvania, and was a 
child of three years when the family moved to Indiana. He was reared under 
excellent home influences, attended as opportunities afforded the district 
schools and while still a youth began working at the trade of carpentry under 
his father's direction. Possessing natural mechanical skill, he soon became a 
proficient workman and he continued building for a number of years in his 
own and other towns. In connection with mechanical work, he also gave 
much attention to agriculture, became the owner of several tracts of valuable 
land and in due time forged to the front rank among the successful farmers 
of the county. His realty at the present time amounts to three hundred and 
forty-seven acres, the greater part cleared and in a high state of cultivation, 
while his improvements, including one of the finest and most commodious 
residences in the county, compare favorably with the best in this part of the 
state. The imposing dwelling which he now occupies is modern in every 
respect and sumptuously furnished, was erected under Mr. Gray's personal 
supervision and nothing was lacking to make it complete in all its parts, being 
among the largest, best arranged and most attractive homes in Fountain 
county. 

Mr. Gray has made a success of life and is today one of the financially 
solid men of the community in which he resides. In addition to his large 
landed and agricultural interests he is a heavy stockholder in the Newtown 
Bank, which institution owes its inception and subsequent growth to him 
more than to any other individual. It was he who called the first meeting to 
consider the advisability of establishing such an institution, and when it was 
decided to push the matter, he secured over seventy-five. per cent, of the stock, 
besides using his efforts in other ways to arouse an interest in the organization 
and insure its popularity. He also took an active part in organizing the local 
telephone system at Newtown, purchased stock and has ever since manifested 



53^| FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

an abiding interest in the enterprise. Jn many other respects, he lias labored 
for the material progress of the town and township, advocating all laudable 

measures for the general g 1 and sparing no reasonable efforts to advance 

the social and moral welfare of the community. A progressive Republican in 

politics and well informed on the issues of the day. be takes no part in polit- 
ical matters further than to vote his principles and defend the soundness of 
his opinions. 

Mr. Gray, in the year 1870J was united in the bonds of wedlock with 
Charlotte Goen, whose parents, Isaac and Rachel (Sears) Coen, moved to 
Fountain county many yeare ago and were among the pioneer settlers of 
Richland township. Mir. and Airs. Cocn died in the years 1892 and 1900, re- 
spectively. They had a family of nine children, whose names were as fol- 
lows: Airs. Theresa Riffle, John, Mrs. Rilla Parrot, Mrs. Mary Rolfing, Mrs. 
Alice McCally, Mrs. Celestia Kerr. Francis and Lincoln, the subject's wife 
being the fifth in order of birth and one of the five now living. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Gray three children haw been born, namely: Elwood married Annie 
Ouigle, and lives on the Coen homestead in Richland township: Lelia Leona, 
wife of Wilber F. Parnell, of this count)', and William, who married Ethel 
Dagger, a farmer and stock raiser of Richland township. 



THOMAS SHULTZ. 

The record of a life well spent, of triumph over obstacles, of perseverance 
under difficulties and steady advancement from a modest beginning to a place 
of honor and distinction in the community, is worthy of permanent record. 
On the roster of the names of those who have been prominently identified with 
the development and upbuilding of Fountain county, Indiana, that of Thomas 
Shultz merits a place of honor. All his life he has been a resident of this 
county, and his energies have always been effectively directed along normal 
lines of effort and business enterprise, through which he has made distinct 
contribution to the progress of this favored section of the state. His life has 
been characterized by integrity and usefulness and such has been his associa- 
tion with business and civic affairs that it is altogether proper that a record 
of his career be perpetuated in this publication. 

Thomas Shultz was born in Richland township, Fountain county, Indiana, 
on January 29, 1853, and he is the son of Isaac and Anna (Ogle) Shultz. The 
father was born in Ohio on August 4, 1823, and the mother was a native of 




THOMAS SHULTZ. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 537 

Richland township, Fountain county, Indiana, born on August 4, 1827, on the 

farm now owned by the subject of this sketch. These parents had a family 
of eight children, namely: Thomas, the subject of this sketch; George, who 
is living west of Newtown; William W., of Newtown; Henry L., who lives 
in Louisiana; Laura i> the wife of John Crawford, who lives near Attica, in 
Logan township; Andrew died young; Edgar is living in Richland township, 
this count)-; Monroe, who lived al Newtown, died in 10.12; besides these, 
Lero_\ , Louisa and Angeline, who were older than the subject, died in child- 
hood. Isaac Shultz was a farmer and an early settler of Fountain county, 
having come here from Ohio with his father, William Shultz, in 1830, at 
which time they settled about three miles northeast of Newtown. The date 
of his birth was August 4, 1823, and on February 15, 1S44. he married Anna 
Ogle, who was born on August 4, 1827. He was a Methodist in religious be- 
lief. In politics, he was first a Democrat, but because of his opposition to 
slavery he joined the Whig party, and finally became a Republican on the 
formation of that party. His death occurred on March 6, 1888, being >ur- 
vived a number of years by his widow, whose death occurred on May 30, 1904. 
Thomas Shultz, who has lived on and operated the old home farm, re- 
ceived his education in the common schools, though, having always been a 
wide reader and close observer, he has gained a vast fund of valuable knowl- 
edge aside from his school course. He has always followed the vocation to 
which he was reared, owning now a fine farm of three hundred and sixty- 
seven acres of good farming land in Richland township, and in this time- 
honored vocation he has met with a large measure of success. Aside 
from his farming interests, Mr. Shultz is also interested in a number of other 
enterprises which have contributed to the commercial and economic welfare of 
the community. He was one of the moving spirits and president of the organ- 
ization of the Newtown Bank, having probably done more than any other one 
man to secure the organization of the institution. He was also active in the 
organization of the Newtown Telephone Company and is the president of that 
organization at the. present time. He was also one of the group of men who 
organized the first building and loan association here, so that it is seen by 
this record that Mr. Shultz has been foremost in every good work for he 
advancement and progress of his home community. His efforts have not gone 
without recognition by his fellow citizens and his standing in the community 
is an enviable one in every respect. He has taken an active interest in local 
public affairs and he has rendered efficient service as a member of the county 
board of review and the township advisory board. 



538 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Mr. Shultz has, politically, given his support to the Republican party, 
and is now aligned with the Progressive branch, in the success of which he 
is interested. His religious membership is with the Presbyterian church, of 
which he is a liberal supporter. He is a deacon in that body and at the time 
of the erection of the present building he took a leading part in advancing 
the work, being at that time treasurer of the society and in many ways con- 
tributing to the success of the enterprise. 

In October, 191 o, Mr. Shultz left the farm and moved into a pleasant 
and attractive home in Newtown, where he now resides, though he still gives 
his active direction to all his interests, agricultural and business. His town 
home is surrounded by an acre of land and here there is ever in evidence the 
spirit of true hospitality. 

In 1874 Mr. Shultz was married to Clara Gray, the daughter of William 
M. and Sarah (Persing) Gray. William M. Gray was born in Pennsylvania 
in 1 82 1 and became a carpenter by vocation. In 1852 he came to Fountain 
county, Indiana, locating at Newtown, where he became a successful carpenter 
and builder. Politically, he was a Republican, fraternally, a Mason, and in 
religion a Presbyterian. He died in 1908 and his wife in 1888. They were 
the parents of the following children: John H.; Horace, who is represented 
elsewhere in this work; Clara, wife of the subject of this sketch; Edith, who 
became the wife of Charles Kerr, and Mrs. Mable Ogle, of Newtown. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Shultz have been born three children, namely : Murray 
I., who married Blanche Van der Volger; Chalmer T., who is cashier of the 
Bank of Newtown; Horace S., who married Abigail McCauley. In every 
avenue of life's activities Mr. Shultz has faithfully performed his full duty 
and, because of his pronounced business ability, his well deserved success and 
his high personal character, he has won and retains the sincere respect and 
esteem of the entire community. 



CHARLES ALBERT BROWN. 

Standing for upright manhood and progressive citizenship, the subject 
of this sketch has long occupied a conspicuous place among the representatives 
of the business interests of Fountain county and his influence in every rela- 
tion of life has made for the material advancement of the community in which 
he resides and the moral welfare of those with whom he has been brought 
into contact. Charles Albert Brown, well known contractor, comes of an old 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 539 

family, the genealogy of which goes back to an early period in the history of 
this section of the commonwealth of Indiana, and from that day to this mem- 
bers of the family have played well their part in the affairs of the community. 

Mr. Brown was born at Attica, Fountain county, Indiana, June ij, 1858, 
and here he grew to manhood and has spent his life. He is the son of Michael 
C. and Elizabeth J (VanSickle) Brown, who were born in Wabash township, 
Fountain county, Indiana, and whose parents spent their earlier years in Ohio, 
from which state they came to Fountain county, Indiana, in pioneer times and 
established their home in Wabash township, where by perseverance and hard 
work they won in the face of obstacles and early hardships and discourage- 
ments, and here the father spent the rest of his life, dying on August 10, 1873, 
in Shawnee township. He was a cabinet-maker by trade, but 'farming was 
his chief life work. Politically, he was a Democrat, but was not a public 
man. His widow has survived him thirty-nine years, and still resides in this 
county, having now attained an advanced age. 

Nine children were born to Michael C. Brown and wife, namely: Alice, 
who married, first, Samuel Biggs and, second, W. B. Stocking ; Charles Albert, 
subject of this sketch; Martha, who married John Dawson; Maggie, who mar- 
ried Joseph Hickman; Emma, who married, first, John Corey, second, William 
Wolf, and, third, J. B. Yazel; Mary married Thomas W. Williams; William, 
who died in infancy; Simon married, first, Carey Picket and, second, Cora 
Gorman; and Minerva, who married, first, James Curtis and, second, William 
Lamb, was the youngest of the family. 

Charles A. Brown received his education in the common schools of Van 
Buren and Shawnee townships. He improved his opportunities and received 
a very practical education. During the summer months when he was a boy 
he assisted his father with his work about the place, also learned something 
of carpentry under him. He perfected .himself at the carpenter's trade, also 
spent five years in mill work and two years as an engineer. 

In 1880 Mr. Brown entered the business of contracting and building, in 
which he is still actively engaged, having thus for a period of thirty-two years 
been actively identified with the line of work for which he seems to have been 
well qualified by both nature and training, and many substantial and attractive 
buildings of all descriptions stand as monuments to his skill throughout this 
locality. He is a very careful and conscientious workman and has been both 
a close observer and a student of modern architecture and, being ever honest 
and straightforward in his dealings with his fellow men, he has the good will 
and the confidence of all classes. 



540 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES., INDIANA. 

Mf. Bfown was married on November i. [883, to Marj E. Ward, daugh- 
ter of Samuel and Effie (Keep) Ward, the former of Scott county, Kentucky, 

and the latter a native of Fountain county. To this union two children were 
born, Erne E., who lives ai home, and one who died in infancy. 

Politically, Mr. Brown is a Democrat, and he has been more or less inter- 
ested in the affairs of his county in a political way. He is the present trustee 
of Troy township, and for six years was a member of the city council, 
filling these offices with eminent satisfaction. He has long been prominent in 
fraternal affairs, being a member of the .Masonic order, the Knights of 
Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Tribe of Ben-Hur. 



THOMAS M. POWELL. 

That life is the most useful and desirable that results in the greatest 
good to the greatest number, and, though all do not reach the heights to 
which they aspire, yet in some measure each can win success and make life a 
blessing to his fellow men. It is not necessary for one to occupy eminent 
public positions to do so, for in the humbler walks of life there remains much 
good to be accomplished and many opportunities for the exercise of talents 
and influence, that in some way will touch the lives of those with whom we 
come in contact, making them better and brighter. In the list of Fountain 
county's successful citizens, the late Thomas M. Powell, of Attica, long oc- 
cupied a prominent place. In his record there is much that is commendable, 
and his career forcibly illustrates what a life of energy can accomplish when 
plans are wisely laid and actions are governed by right principles, noble aims 
and high ideals. During his long and busy life no word of suspicion was ever 
breathed against him. His actions were the result of careful and conscien- 
tious thought, and when once convinced that he was right, no suggestion of 
policy or personal profit could swerve him from the course he had decided on. 
His career was complete and rounded in its beautiful simplicity; he did his 
full duty in all the relations of life, and he died beloved of those near to him, 
and respected and esteemed by his fellow citizens. In offering the following 
resume of his life history it is believed that it will serve as an incentive to the 
youth whose careers are yet matters for the future to determine. 

Thomas M. Powell, who at the time of his death was the oldest mer- 
chant in Attica, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, on November 8, 1833, and 
his death occurred on April 30, 1912. He was the son of George Powell, an 



FOUNTAIN AND WARKEN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 541 

able and prominent physician in Baltimore, who was nut only unusually suc- 
cessful in his professional field, but who took a leading part in advancing 
social, moral and religious work. Mr. Powell received a good practical edu- 
cation in the public schools of his native city and remained at home until 1857, 
in which year he came to Attica, Indiana, with which city 1 lis interests were 
ever afterwards identified. He first took employment here as a tinner in the 
shop of I. W. Hart, who a few years later sold the business to William Fow- 
ler, in order to enter the army, Mr. Powell remaining an employe in the shop 
under Mr. Fowler. Subsequently, he became himself proprietor of the shop. 
Early during the war of the Rebellion Mr. Powell, feeling that his services 
were needed in the defense of the national union, enlisted in the Seventy- 
second Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, but a short time after his enlist- 
ment he was taken ill and, after spending some time in a hospital, he was 
discharged for disability and returned home. Though disappointed that he 
was not able to actively defend his country in her hour of need, Mr. Powell's 
loyalty was in evidence all through the remainder of the struggle and as a 
home worker and supporter of the cause in many material ways he rendered 
valuable and appreciated service. He was among the first to organize for the 
observance of decorating soldiers' graves and for many years was one of 
three persons who annually perfected arrangements for this beautiful service. 

Referring to the active years of his mercantile life in Attica, one who 
knew him well spoke of him as follows: '"Mr. Powell was the oldest mer- 
chant in Attica, having been in business here for nearly a century. In the 
early days he temporarily dropped his tools and for a time was editor of the 
Attica Ledger when it was under the management of C. W. Bateman. He 
manifested some ability in this line and, after returning to the tinner's bench, 
frequently gave evidence of natural talent in prose and in occasional verse. His 
business knew no variation. He was a familiar figure, going between home 
and business with clock-like regularity, his industry and devotion through the 
long years offering a striking example of faithfulness. Perhaps he had more 
than his share of mercantile troubles, but, undauntedly, he 'kept everlastingly 
at it' and from them emerged with integrity unscathed. 

"The chief corner-stone of his life was honesty and no condition could 
arise that would cause the people who knew him to question that. To illus- 
trate this characteristic an incident may be given. At one time, under the 
stress of financial clouds, it became necessary for him to settle with a whole- 
sale firm by giving his note. Later, when he emerged from the tangle, he 
wrote the firm he was ready to meet the obligation. The reply came that the 
note was paid. He insisted that it was still due and finally persuaded the 



54 2 FOUNTAIN AND WAKKEN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

firm to make an investigation. It developed that the note had been paid by a 
T. M. Powell living in another state, and to him the money was returned by 
his namesake. Hundreds of similar instances could be given to show that even 
under the allurement of great temptations he never swerved from the right 
course. He was the embodiment of honesty, one of the noblest traits of char- 
acter. 

In Mr. Powell religious sentiment was strong and was the strongest 
controlling force in his life. It is said that to his father and grandfather he 
is indebted for many of the tendencies shown by him toward higher and 
better things in life. This tendency early found practical expression while a 
young man in Baltimore, where he was one of the prime movers in organizing 
the group of young men which afterwards developed into the Young Men's 
Christian Association, that splendid society which now extends throughout 
the world. He was probably the last survivor of that notable group of men. 
lie was always active in religious work and established mission Sunday 
schools in Baltimore and was an effective worker in this cause. This desire 
to carry the gospel to those isolated from the direct influence of church work 
remained with him all through life and for several years he maintained a mis- 
sion in Attica and was always deeply interested in the welfare of those who 
were unfortunate. For more than forty years he was superintendent of the 
Presbyterian Sunday school and for half a century was a working member 
of that church, his regularity at service and his deep interest in all phases of 
its work furnishing a splendid example of fidelity and faith. 

Mr. Powell became a member of the Attica lodge of Free and Accepted 
Masons, of which body he was the oldest member at the time of his death. 

In June, 1877, Thomas M. Powell was united in marriage to Carrie 
Picken, the daughter of Robert and Rachael (Hooker) Picken. Robert 
Picken was a native of the state of Ohio, who came to Fountain county, 
Indiana, in an early day and here followed farming. The Hooker family 
were also residents of Ohio, and it was in that state that Mr. and Mrs. Picken 
were married and their children born. The latter were named as follows: 
Rachael, who became the wife of Joseph Poole, now deceased; Hunter, de- 
ceased; America, deceased; Virginia, deceased; Richard, of Attica; Robert, 
deceased; Mary, who married John Ncwlin, has one son, John R., who is 
bookkeeper and cashier in a hotel at Mudlavia; Carrie is the widow of the 
subject of this sketch. To Mr. and Mrs. Powell a son, George Robert, was 
born, his death occurring at the age of nine years. Mr. Powell's home life 
was full of tenderness, sacrifice, solicitude, and in it he dispensed a love 
cheering; in its constancy and loyal in its devotion. He was everywhere re- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 543 

garded as a wide-awake, enterprising man of the times, fully alive to the 
dignities and responsibilities of citizenship, and, to the extent of his ability, 
contributed to the general prosperity i the community honored by his citizen- 
ship. Courteous, affable and easily approached, he commanded the undivided 
respect of all with whom he came in contact, and his friends were bounded 
only by I lie limits of his acquaintance, being universally esteemed in all the 
relations of life. 



WILLIAM A. LAWSON. 

There could be no more comprehensive history written of a city or even 
of a state and its people than that which deals with the life-work of those 
who, by their own endeavor and indomitable energy, have placed themselves 
where they well deserve the title of "prominent and progressive," and in this 
sketch will be found the record of one who has outstripped the less active 
and less able trodders on the highway of life and who today occupies an en- 
viable position in his community. 

William Lawson is a native of Montgomery county, Indiana, born on 
November 27, 1854, and is the son of parents who were born in Sweden, 
their deaths occurring while on a visit to that country when the subject of this 
sketch was quite young. Thus left without the protection or guidance of his 
parents, young Lawson was taken into the home of James Archer, of Foun- 
tain county, where he was reared. Mr. Archer was born in 1827, being the 
first white boy born in Richland township. The subject received his educa- 
tion in the schools of Fountain county and as soon as old enough he devoted 
his energies to farm work, in which line of endeavor he has always been 
engaged. By dint of indefatigable industry and wise economy he was 
enabled to get ahead in the world, making constant and steady progress, and 
he is now the owner of one hundred and thirty-seven acres of fine land in 
Richland township, to the cultivation of which he devotes himself assiduously, 
with splendid success. He has placed good, permanent improvements on the 
place, and the general appearance of the farm indicates the owner to be a 
man of practical ideas and excellent judgment. In connection with general 
farming, he also gives some attention to the raising of live stock, in the hand- 
ling of which he has met with a gratifying measure of success. 

On January 13, 1881, Mr. Lawson was united in marriage with Mary M. 
Murray, the daughter of Henry and Ruth (Fowler) Murray. The Murray 
family came from Kentucky in an early day and settled in Richland township, 



544 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

where Mrs. Lawson's father, Henry Murray, was born. The Fowlers came 
from Ohio and were early settlers in Tippecanoe county, Indiana. To Mr. 
and Airs. Lawson were born two children, namely: Marion E., who married 
Minnie, the daughter of George Myatt, and one that died in infancy. 

Mr. Lawson takes an intelligent interest in public, affairs and his sup- 
port is given to the Republican party, in the success of which he is interested, 
though he is in no sense a seeker after public office. Religiously, he is a mem- 
ber and liberal supporter of the Disciples church. His fraternal membership 
is with the Improved Order of Red Men, in the workings of which he takes a 
live interest. Mr. Lawson is a man of g jod habits and because of his unright 
life and the splendid success which he has achieved by his own persistent 
efforts, he has earned the warm regard and unstinted confidence of those with 
whom he has associated. He and his wife move in the best social circles of 
the community and are popular with all classes. 



-WILLIAM V. STANFIELD, M. D. 

The man who devotes his talents and energies to the noble work of 
ministering to the ills and alleviating the sufferings of humanity is pursuing a 
calling which in dignity, importance and beneficial results is second to no other. 
If true to his profession and earnest in his efforts to enlarge his sphere of use- 
fulness, he is indeed a benefactor of his kind, for to him more than to any 
other man are entrusted the safety, the comfort and in many instances the 
lives of those who place themselves under his care and profit by his services. 
One of the leading physicians of the younger generation in Fountain and War- 
ren counties is Dr. William V. Stanfield, of the village of Newtown, who, 
although a comparatively newcomer here, has built up an extensive and rapidly 
growing patronage and won a wide circle of friends by his commendable 
course, and, judging from his past success in his chosen field of endeavor, the 
future years must necessarily augur much of good for him. 

Doctor Stanfield is a native of the Blue Grass state and has the pleasing 
personality of most of those who hail from there, his birth having occurred in 
Kentucky, February 12, 1876. He is the son of Thomas J. and Martha 
(Purcell) Stanfield, the father a native of Kentucky, and they still reside at 
the town of Cowan, that state, Mr. Stanfield being a shoemaker by trade. 

Doctor Stanfield was reared in his native state and received his education 
in the common schools and the high school, subsequently taking a course lead- 




WILLIAM V. STANFIKLD, M. D. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 545 

ing to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Central College, in Kentucky. He 
began life for himself by teaching school, which he followed with much suc- 
cess for a period of three years. Having for some tune desired to enter the 
medical field, he went to Louisville, where he attended the Medical College 
one year, then, in 1901, attended the Indiana Medical College at Indianapolis, 
remaining there until his graduation in 1904, having made a brilliant record 
in all these institutions. Thus e -ptionally well equipped for his vocation, 
he came to West Point, Indiana, where he practiced medicine for some time, 
then removed to Newtown, Fountain county, where he has remained to the 
present time, and is enjoying a large and lucrative practice, which extends 
over a wide territory. He has a beautiful home here, which he came into 
possession of before he left college. He has a modern motor car and his office 
is equipped with all up-to-date instruments and appliances for the successful 
practice of his profession. 

Doctor Stanheld was married in. 1904 to Edith Clawson, daughter of 
Baker and Julia (Floyd) Clawson. 

Politically, Doctor Stanfield is a Democrat, He is secretary of the town 
board and is deputy health commissioner of Fountain county. Fraternally, 
he belongs to Masonic Lodge No. 205, at Newtown, lie is a member of the 
County Medical Society and is affiliated with the Presbyterian church. 

Doctor Stanfield is a stockholder and director of the Newtown Bank, at 
Newtown, having been connected with this popular institution for the past two 
years, and he is secretary of the organization, of which Horace Gray is presi- 
dent. 



GEORGE W. CRANE. 

The best title one can establish to the high and generous esteem of an 
intelligent community is a protracted and honorable residence therein. George 
W. Ciane, one of the best known and most highly esteemed citizens of Foun- 
tain county, has resided here during all of his life, nearly seven decades, 
and his caieer has been a most commendable one in every respect, well deserv- 
ing of being perpetuated on the pages of a historical work of the nature of the 
one in band. Like his sterling father before him, he has been a man of well 
defined purpose and carried to successful completion every task to which he 
set himself. Beginning his life in a comparatively new country and under 
many unfavorable auspices, he let nothing deter him, and before the lapse of 

'(35) 



540 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

many years he had a fine farm under cultivation, improving and selling several 
others also. Believing that this county was to take high rank among the rich 
and productive localities of the Hoosier state, he never fell inclined to go else- 
where and, applying himself closely to his work, the future brought to him its 
rewards. 

(ieorge W. Crane was borii it Portland, Fountain county, Indiana, De- 
cember II, 1844, and is the son of Henry and Eliza (Sharp) Crane, the father 
a native of Marion county, Ohio, and the mother of Kentucky. The subject's 
paternal grandparents were Jonathan and Keziah (Tappan) Crane, who were 
of English descent, though natives themselves of New Jersey. They were the 
parents of nine children, namely: Nancy, Hulda, Joseph, James, Henry, 
Mary, Phoebe, Harvey and Joel. . • 

Henry Crane was married twice. By this union with Eliza, the subject's 
mother, he had the following children: Jacob II.. who was 1 soldier i 1 a 
New York cavalry regiment, died at Bryson City. North Carolina; Mrs. 
Lockey Jenkins, of Clearwater, Nebraska; Keziah married a Mr. Green anil 
since her death he has lived in Labette county, Kansas; Jonathan, who was a 
soldier in the Sixtieth Indiana Regiment, under Captain Walker, died at 
Milligan's Bend, Louisiana: George W., the subject of this sketch; Joseph j.. 
who lived in Lawrence county, Tennessee, is deceased and is buried at Osborne 
Prairie; Mary Vernon, deceased, lived in Nebraska; Jephtha died at the age 
of two years. By his second marriage, which was to Evaline Simmerman, 
Mr. Crane had the following children: James Harvey, Almira (deceased), 
William (deceased), and Frank. The Simmermans were from Virginia. 
Henry Crane, the subject's father, accompanied his parents to Indiana in an 
early day, settling at Portland; later, in 1845, he moved to Osborne Prairie. 
He was a tanner by trade and followed this occupation in early life. 1 lis wife, 
who was of Scotch and English descent, received two slaves as a part of her 
wedding dowry. 

George W. Crane received a good education in the common schools and 
his only occupation has been that of a farmer. In deciding upon that course 
he showed good judgment, for his efforts were rewarded with abundant suc- 
cess, so that eventually he was enabled to lay aside the implements of hus- 
bandry and enjoy the rest which he had so richly earned. He is the owner of 
a fine farm of one hundred and seventy-five and three quarter acres in Van 
Buren township, one of the best farms in the township, the improvements of 
which were made by Mr. Crane. Mr. Crane now resides in Veedersburg in 
a pleasant home, surrounded by many friends who through a long period of 
years have learned to respect and esteem him as a man among men, "four 
.square to every wind that blows." 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 547 

On August j't, 1874, Mr. Crane was united in marriage to Mary E. Lud- 
low, the daughter of Watson and Mary (Smith) Ludlow, who came from 
New Jersey, the father coming when a mere boy. II settled in Fountain 
county and was employed as farmer and mechanic. His death occurred in 
Tennessee. To Mr. and Mrs. Crane three children have been born, namely: 
Ludlow, deceased; Jda. at home, and Clifford, of Danville. 

Mr. Crane has never sought public office, but was at one time induced 
to serve as road supervisor. He is essentially a self-made man and no citizen 
of his county is more entitled to personal mention in a book of the character 
of the one at hand. 



SELESTIN R. RIESTER. 

; This \ lerable citizen, who has nobly earned the proud title of "self- 
made man,' is a native of Germany, having been born in the kingdom of 
Baden on the 24th of February, 1829. His parents, Joseph and Julia Ann 
(Zimmerman) Riester, the former a tailor by trade, were also of German 
birth, both having long slept the sleep of the just in the ancestral burying 
grounds in the fatherland. This couple had lour children: Joseph, the oldest, 
died on the Ohio river while en route from New Orleans to Cincinnati ; \gnes 
departed this life in that city, and Teresa, wdio married Joseph Sellan, died 
in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in the year 1900. the subject of this sketch 
being the only living representative of the family. 

Selestin Riester spent his early life near the place of his birth, and 
when a young man decided to improve his financial condition in the great 
American republic across the seas, where so many of his countrymen had 
found homes arid affluence. Accordingly, in 1848, he bade adieu to the 
fatherland and, taking passage in a sailing vessel, set his face toward the 
new world and a new destiny. After a long and tiresome journey of fifty- 
two days, the vessel arrived at New Orleans, its destination, in which city 
Mr. Riester spent the five months ensuing and then came via the Mississippi 
and Ohio rivers to Cincinnati, where he remained for a period of three years, 
variously employed. In 1856 he came to Fountain county, Indiana, and set- 
tled in the woods of Richland township, where he secured a tract of land, 
which he at once proceeded to clear and otherwise improve. Without nar- 
rating in detail his long and arduous struggle to establish a home, suffi • it to 
say that in due time he cleared and reduced to cultivation one hundred and 
twenty of his one hundred and sixty acres of land, made all the improvements 



548 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES., INDIANA. 

on the plai by his own labor and now has one of the finest and most valuable 
farms in the township of Richland. Mr. Riester began life in America with- 
out a dollar in his possession and his splendid estate and independent finan- 
cial condition are the results of his own well-directed labor and judicious 
business management. For a period of fifty- six years he has lived within a 
half mile of his present place of residence, during which time he has forged 
to the front as a farmer and stock raiser and as a citizen occupies a conspicu- 
ous place among the most enterprising and progressive of his contemporary 
In addition to his agricultural interests, he owns stock in the Bank of Mellott 
and in the year 1900 he erected a fine modern home in the town where he has 
since resided in honorable retirement, though still giving personal attention to 
his business affairs. 

Mr. Riester has been twice married, the first time to Christine Fund, a 
native of Baden, who bore him seven children, namely: Joseph, a farmer of 
Richland township; Julia (deceased), wife of James L. Stevens, of Coving- 
ton; Ellen married Homer Waterman, and lives on the home farm; Hen- 
rietta Alice, wife of Samuel Rice; John F., of Indianapolis; Hattie May, 
wife of Joseph Carmen ; and Emma, who married Frank Jenkins, an employe 
of the Indianapolis Nezvs. The mother of these children dying in 1872, Mr. 
Riester was united in marriage with Barbara Kohler, daughter of Frank and 
Martina (Kist) Kohler, natives of Baden, who came to the United States in 
1853 and settled in Fountain county. 

Mr. Riester is a Democrat in politics, but with the exception of town- 
ship offices, such as supervisor and school director, has never sought prefer- 
ment at the hands of his fellow citizens. In religion the Baptist church rep- 
resents his creed, to which denomination his wife also belongs, his children 
being members of the Christian church. 



WILLIAM L. MESSMORE. 

One of the leading citizens and 'representative agriculturists of Fountain 
county, Indiana, is Wi Ham L. Messmore, proprietor of a fine farm in Rich- 
land township, and one of the substantial citizens of his section of the county. 
His has been an eminently active and useful life, but the limited space at the 
disposal of the biographer forbids more than a casual mention of the leading 
events in his career, which will suffice to show that earnest endeavor and hon- 
esty of purpose rightly applied and persistently followed will lead to unquali- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COONTIESj INDIANA. 549 

fied success. He is a man of influence in local affairs and he is looked upon 
as a man thoroughly in sympathy with any movement looking toward the 
betterment or advancement in any way of his community, where he has al- 
ways been regarded as a man of sterling honesty and worthy of the utmost 
confidence and respect which his fellow citizens ha* • been free to accord 

William L. Messmore is a native of the township in which he now lives 
and was horn on September 27, 185S. lie is the s.^u of Andrew and Abigail 
( Hunt) Messmore. The lather, who was a native of Pennsylvania, came to 
Fountain county, Indiana, in 1846, settling west of the subjei >r< sent farm 
in Richland township. He bought the present farm in [<S< since which 
time it has remained in the family. He followed farming and was active up 
to the time of his death, which occurred in 1901, at the age of eighty-four 
years. His widow survived him several years, her death occurring in 1909. 
He was a Democrat in 
of the Christian (New- 
children, namely: Mai 
Indiana; Henry, of \ 
St. mt. deceased, of Mo 
min Stout ; Newton, d< 
(Mrs. Jackson), of Ci 
William L., the immed 
John Cowan, of Crawfordsville. 

William L. Messmore was given the advantage of; good, practical edu- 
cation in the public schools of his home community and was reared to the 
life oi a farmer, from which honorable vocation he has never departed, 
wisely perceiving that in this line of effort he was guaranteed surer profits and 
more independence of action than in any other profession. He has been an 
indefatigable worker, his efforts being wisely directed in all details, so that 
he has been successful to an eminent degree. He now owns and operates one 
hundred and .eighty-seven acres of the old home farm, on which he has made 
some additional permanent improvements of a substantial character, and he 
keeps the place up to twentieth-century standards in every respect, it being 
now numbered among the best farms of the community. The residence is one 
of the finest and best appointed in the county, being conveniently arranged 
and provided with all the improvements which comfort and advantage could 
suggest. 

In 1882 Mr. Messmore was united in marriage with Elvira Strader, the 
daughter of Sampson and Rachael (Furr) Strader. The Strader family 
were among the early settlers of Fountain county, the grandfather, who was 



his political 


Faith while, r 


ellgiousl; . 1 ■ 


a rneml et 


Light) churcl 


1 To him a 


nd hi- wife w< 


sreborn eleven 


tha, the wife 


of John B 


Brown; Chai 


■les, -I Attica, 


r eedersburg, 


Indiana; M< 


illie, the wit's 


i of John M. 


ntgomery con 


ncy. Indiana 


; Emma, the ■ 


wife. -of Benja- 


■ceased; John 


.•if Craw f 01 


dsville, Indiai 


1a ; Eliza Jane 


■awfordsville ; 




1 C\Ii>. Brea 


ks i. deceased ; 


Siate subject 1 




: Margaret [ 


).. the wife of 



550 FOUNTAIN AND WARKEN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

a cooper, coming here in 1822 and settling in Richland township. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Messmore has been born one child, Pearl, who is the wife of Lee 
Moser and the mother of one child, Lawrence. The Moser family are from 
Pennsylvania. 

In political matters, Mr. Messmore is aligned with the Democratic party, 
in the success of which he is deeply interested. His religious affiliation is with 
the Christian church, to which he give his earnest support. He is a man of 
good principles, which he exemplifies in his daily life, and because of his 
upright life in the community he enjoys marked prestige among those who 
are familiar with his record. 



THOMAS E. MARTIN. 

Among the members of the many families of early settlers of Fountain 
count)- who have forged to the front in the realm of public life and in their 
daily avocations, few indeed have reached a higher standing than Thomas E. 
Martin, one of the leading fanners and stock men of Richland township, 
whose useful and successful life has ever been associated with the progress 
of the county, especially in the township where he resides. 

Mr. Martin was born in the township and on the farm where he now 
resides on October 29, 1856. He is a son of John S. and Ellen (Meharry) 
Martin, both parents natives of Ohio, in which state they grew to maturity, 
received their educations and were married. Ephraim Martin came to Foun- 
tain county, Indiana, in 1833, and settled in Richland township, where he 
bought land, a part of which the subject now owns. He was well known in 
this section of the county in its early history and he devoted his life success- 
fully to agricultural pursuits. John S. Martin's family consisted of the fol- 
lowing children: Rhoda E. married A. C. Schermerhorn, of Newtown, this 
count)'; Thomas E., subject of this review; Ida married E. J. Kirkpatrick, of 
Richland township, Fountain count)-; Je^se is president of the Central Na- 
tional Bank of Attica, and is well known as a financier; Ann Etta married D. 
M. Gardner, and died in 1904. 

Thomas E. Martin' was reared on the home farm and there he soon 
began assisting with the work during the crop seasons. J le received his educa- 
tion in the common schools, then turned his attention to fanning and has been 
actively engaged in general agricultural pursuits ewer since. lie is the owner 
of one of the most desirable and best improved farms in the eastern part of 
the county, consisting of four hundred and fifty-six acres, all of it under the 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 55 1 

plow except twenty-five acres of timber and pasture. It is part of the old 
home place. He has an attractive home and excellent outbuildings. 

Mr. Martin was married in 1878 to Lizzie Fisher, daughter of X. Y. 
and Julia A. Fisher, both of whom came from near Bear dap, Pennsylvania, 
and settled near Newtown, Fountain county, Indiana, in 1850. They became 
the parents of four children, namely: Elmer is deceased; Charlie is deceased: 
Lizzie, wife of Mr. Martin, of this sketch; Alary married Dr. Ay DelOtte, of 
Newtown. N. Y. Fisher followed carpentering all his life and, being ex- 
ceptionally skilled, his services were in great demand. 

Four children have been born to the subject and wife, namely: Alva Lee 
and William Carlin are both deceased; Louella married Charles F. Bacon, of 
Richland township; Benjamin C. is at home. 

Politically, Mr. Martin is a Republican, and he has been a member of 
the advisory board of his township for ten years. He belongs to the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church, being a liberal supporter of the same, lie is universally 
regarded as one of the county's best citizens. 



JOSEPH RIESTER. 

He whose career is now taken under consideration, and to whom the 
reader's attention is respectfully directed, is numbered among the progressive 
and successful farmers of Richland township, Fountain county, of which he 
has been a resident for many years, while he has gained prosperity through 
his own honest efforts in connection with the natural resources and subsequent 
business prosperity of this favored section of the Hoosier state, and while he 
has labored for his individual advancement he has not neglected his duties to 
the general public. 

Joseph Riester was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, February 13, 1854. lie is 
the son of Selestin and Christy Ann Riester, an excellent old family, a com- 
plete sketch of whom is to lie found on another page of this work. 

Joseph Riester grew to manhood under the parental roof and be received 
a good education in the common schools. Early in life he took up farming 
for a livelihood and this he has continued to follow with gratifying results to 
the present day. He is the owner of ninety-six acres of well located and finely 
improved land on which he carries on general farming and stock raising, and 
on his place is to be found a very comfortable residence and good outbuild- 
ings, he having ma< e practically all the improvements himself, especially the 



55- FOl NTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

more modern ones. He has long made a specially of breeding pure bred 
Duroc-Jersey hogs, all registered stock. Owing- to the superior quality of his 
fine hogs they arc very pi alar in tins part oi the county and arc greatly 
admired by all who are interested in fine stock, and thej bring a fanq 
whenever. offered for sale, tie understands well the pi ipei can 
no small part of '' : ~ annual i c >me is derived from tl 
is due him for bringing to this community a higher gr; 
ever known before, 

Mr. Kicster was married on November _'. i8~Q 
daughter Of William and Catherine Stephens, a highl 
were among the early settlers of this s tioi 
! ey. through years of close application and good m. 
established, and here they spent their liv< .' fr 
general farming and his death occurred in 1880 on th 
is now owned by the subject of tl is sketch. He is 
honest, hard-working man who took little part in the affi 
political way. 

Six children were born to William Step! - 
lows: Richard, James Newton, M. O., Phoel . 
Mr. Riester, of this sketch. Mrs. Riester grew 
county and here she received her education in the 
children have been born to the subject and wife, n." 
who married Bert Jones, lives in Van Buren town 
Belle married Noah Townsend, and they live in Da\' 
Tied Albert Miles and they also live in Davis township 
McCauley, of Richland township. 

Politically, Mr. Riester is a Democrat, but he has never held political 
office. Fraternally, he belongs to Tribe No. 144, Improved Order of Red 
Men, at Mellott. Religiously, he belongs to the United Brethren church. 





. 


credit 


i.l e of swii 


le than 


it had 


to Eli /ah 


eth Stej 


■ hen-. 


respectec 


1 family 


. ivho 




uiy, am 


1 here 




. became well 




ted his 1 




old homi 


place, 


which 


emetnben 




quiet, 


fairs of t! 


ie cou 


in a 


d wife, n 


amed a 


s fol- 


an 1 Eliza 


heth, w 


i fe f 




I in Fountain 


minion s( 


:hools. 




led as f. 


illows: 


Ella, 


ip, this c 


ounty : 


Grace 


township 


; Carrie 


mar- 


: Alice married Charles 



EDMOND R. MALLORY. 

A notable example of the successful, self-made man was the late Edmond 
R. Mallory, and as such he made his influence felt among the people of Foun- 
tain county, where he had spent practically all his life and labored for his own 
advancement and that of his locality as well, thereby earning the right to 
be classed among the leading citizens of his day in the community honored by 



SAMUEL PAUGH. 



FOUNTAIN AND WAK1 EN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 553 

his citizenship. His life was an ii teresting one, fraught with much work and 
much good; indeed; it is doubtful if any man of the past generation was so 
intimately intermingled with the history of Wabash township as was Mr. 
Mallory, and his career may well be stud d with profil 
at the parting of the ways whose a matl :i E >r futi - i years to de- 

termine, for it was not only successful from a material standpoint ! ' l it > as 
wholesome in every avi me, exemplary in every rela nodel worth) 

of emulation by all who would be counted among thus.- who win in the battle 
of life and leave behind the greatest oJ all heritages, an lion red name. 

Edmond R. Mallory was born at ( ivington, Fountain county, Indiana. 

on Februai f20, [849, and was the son of William 1!. and Jemima (Kennier) 

•y. The father was born, reared and educated in New York- siate and 

in ■ 1 day he came to Covington, at the time the first settlement 

was ma i ere he enter.-; upon 1 vhich he had 

numbei an I '^- tlso I eing at one time a wealthy 

man. 1 1 Republican in 1 nd took an active part in 

local public at , bei h leading men of his daj in this 

community. 

The subject of this 1 ntal roof and secured 

a good practical education in the comm I - reared to the life 

of a farmer and followed that j irsiiit all his . He was a b 

minded man, of sound, practical sense, and he gave to every phase of his 
operations a careful and discriminal g Ltte : !<>n that never permitted a chance 
of failure. His fine farm of two hundred and forty acres is located in Wabash 
township, Fountain county, and is numbered among the good farms of the 
locality, its appearance indicating the careful attention bestowed upon it in the 
past. The place is improved with a comfortable and attractive residence and 
a large and well arranged barn, while the other outbuildings, fences and the 
general arrangements are in keeping with the progressive spirit of he, who 
inaugurated and carried forward the work here. 

Politically, Mr. Mallory was a stanch Republican, taking a keen interest 
in the success of his party, while his religious belief was represented in the 
creed of the Presbyterian church, of which he was a member. 

On December 21, 1873, Mr. Mallory was united in marriage with Adeline 
Paugh, the daughter of Samuel and Rebecca (Van Dorn) Paugh. Samuel 
Paugh was a native of Butler county, Ohio, and in an early day came to 
Fountain county, Indiana, where he entered two sections of land from the 
government, his daughter, Mrs. Mallory, being now the owner of the original 



554 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, 1X1 \\\. 

deeds, , hich are signed by Martin VanBuren, President, and H. M. Garland, 
recorder <>i the land office. Rebecca Van Dorn was a native of Pennsylvania 

and in her young girlhood she came west with the family, the trip being made 
down the Ohio river in a boal buil > ; her father, Hezekiah Van Dorn. Leav- 
ing the river and coming overlan to Fountain county, the Van Dorn family 
settled in Wabash township, where they entered government land, and there 
the father followed farming during the remainder of his active life. Samuel 
and Rebecca Paugh were the parents of three children, namely: Adeline, 
widow of the subject of this sketch; Ross, deceased; Stella, who became the 
wife of Thomas Frankeberger. To Mr. and Mrs. Mallory were born eight 
children, who are briefly mentioned as follows: Myrtle, deceased; Harry L., 
of this count}-; Homer, who lives at home with his mother, married Man- 
Rhodes; Ida is the wife of Richard Bodine; iattie, Lee, Ralph and Hardy 
are deceased. The death of Mr. Mallory occurred on April 18, 1907. 

In the lives of such men as Mr. Mallory there is particular justification 
'of works of this nature — not only because their lives were such as to gain 
for them the admiration of their fellow men, but that they were true to their 
opporlunities and showed such attributes of character as entitled them to the 
regard of all, and were useful in their spheres of action. In the midst of the 
demands of a busy life Mr. Mallory was always approachable, being gracious 
in his association with his fellow- men and enjoying personal popularity which 
was a natural result of his characteristics. Mrs. Mallory is a woman of many 
estimable qualities and kindly manner and is well liked in the social circles in 
which she moves. 



T. J. FRANKEBERGER. 

Among the substantial men whose labor and influence has long given 
impetus to the agricultural interests and general material improvements of 
Fountain county in years gone by and who today occupies a high place in the 
esteem of the community in which he lives is the worthy gentleman whose 
name introduces this article. ~\\ nile he has been busy tilling the soil and 
raising a good grade of live stock he has not neglected his duties as a citizen 
and neighbor, but has been a forceful factor in all that concerns the public good. 
It is to such men as he that our modern advanced civilization is due and such 
men are worthy of the esteem that is accorded them by all and their records 
are worth)' of perpetuation. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES; INDIA A, 555 

T. J. Frankel rger, of Wabash township, Fountain county, was born in 
Boone county, Indiana, January 5, 1863. lie is the son of Jacob and 
Rachad (Byrd) Frankeberger, both parents bom in Virginia, the father near 
Roanoke, in 1823, and they were married in 1847. They grew up in the 
Old Dominion, were educated (here and there they spent their earlier years, 
coming to Indiana in an early day and locating in Montgomery county. Later 
they came to Fountain county and located on a farm which joins that oi die 
subject on the south. The elder Frankeberger was active in politics, but h 
held no offices. He was a member of the Baptist church. 1 1c .-pent the rest 
of his life in this county and here his death occurred in 1884. Of the eight 
children born to Jacob Frankeberger and wife, six are still living. The 
paternal grandfather of the subject, S: muel Frankeberger, was a native of 
Switzerland, from which country he emigrated to America when young, set- 
tling in Virginia. 

The immediate subject of this sketch spent his boyhood on the home 
farm, where he assisted with the general work, and in the common schools of 
his neighborhood he received his educational training. Early in life he took 
up farming for his vocation and this he has followed to the present time, 
now owning one of the choice farms of Wabash township, which consists of 
three hundred and sixty-five acres, two hundred and fifty acres of which is 
under cultivation, the balance : ; in asture and timber, lie has added 
many important improvements to the place and has a comfortable dwelling 
and a good set of outbuildings. He is a erj careful farmer, rotates his crops 
and so manipulates his soil that it has retai 1 its original fertility and 
strength. He believes in modern methods and everything about his splendid 
place denotes that it has a progressive manager. In connection with general 
farming he devotes no little attention to stock raising, making a specialty of 
short-horn cattle and Poland-China hogs, and he has for a number of years 
bought and sold cattle in large numbers, and no small part of his annual in- 
come is derived from his live stock. 

Mr. Frankeberger was married to Estella Paugh, daughter of Samuel 
and Rebecca (VanDorn) Paugh. Her father was one of the early settlers of 
Fountain county, and became a well known farmer here, he having owned the 
farm on which the subject of this sketch now lives. Mr. Frankeberger has 
done considerable remodeling and now has a fine home, which is located six 
miles from Covington. 

Five children have been born to the subject and wife, namely: Burgess, 
who married Mabel Zigler; Beatrice, who married Oscar Kerr; Zula. Lora 
and Nora are all at home. 



556 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COl H] , INDIANA. 

Politically, the subject is a Democrat and he wa a member of the ad- 
visory b iard ol Wabash towi ship for four years, mid was also supervisor for 
some time, filling these offices to the satisfaction of all concerned. He be- 
longs to the Anti-Horsethicf Association. Personally he is a pleasant, agree- 
able gentleman who is respected bj all who know him. 



A.RLES E. MART 





He to 


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lion 


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f one of the hon- 

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social principles 
haying 
iin< : his on n 



mi Amos and J lannah ( 1'alin) 
nother from Henrj cownty, In- 
1, namely : Cora, deb 
Frank lives in Logan township; 
Charles E., subject of this sketch; Pearl married Newman Marlatt, and they 
live in Richland township. 

Ephraim Martin, the subject's paternal grandfather, emigrated tc Foun- 
tain county from Ohio, after the birth of his son Amos, father of the subject, 
and settled with his family on Wee-ah plains in an early day. 

Charles E. Martin grew to manhood on the home place and there he made 
himself generally useful during the crop seasons, and in the winter time he 
attended the public schools in his community. In 1893 nc married Lillian 
Bookwalter, daughter of William II. and Elizabeth (Florey) Bookwalter. 
Her father came from Ohio to Fountain county, being an early settler of 
Shawnee township, and there he became well established through his thrift, 
and the old stone house in which he lived is still standing on the Bookwalter 
homestead there. Grandfather Bookwalter and wife had a family of five 
children, all living but one. To William and Elizabeth Bookwalter nine chil- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 557 

dren were born, namely: Edward, who lives in the state of V ashington; 
Allison lives in Pawnee county, Nebraska; Lillian, who married Mr. Martin, 
of this review; .Anna makes her home in New Yuri; City; 1'iank and Joseph 
both live in Pawnee county, Nebraska; Bertha lives in i' itrice, Nebraska; 
Lydia lives in New York City; W. H. is a resident of Pawnee county, Ne- 
braska. Three children have been burn to Mr. Martin and wife, namely: 
Annis, Robert and Nadine, all at home. 

Mr. Martin is the owner of a well improved and carefully cultivated 
farm containing one hundred and eighty-seven acres of very productive and 
valuable Ian I, and he has an elegant home and good outbuildings, i le always 
keeps a good grade of live stock. 

Politically, Mr. Martin is a Republican, but he has never held office, al- 
though taking more or less interest in local public affairs. In religious matters 
he is a member of the United Brethren church. 



ALBERT VAN DER VOLGEN. 

Holland is a small country, but it is doubtful if any foreign nation has 
sent to the United States a greater number of law-abiding and industrious 
citizens in proportion to its size. They are, almost without exception, pro- 
gressive, thrifty, honorable and among our best citizens. Albeit Van Der 
Volgen, one of the leading farmers of Richland township, Fountain county, 
is a worthy descendant of this type of people. He seems to have inherited 
many of the traits that win from his ancestors, who may be traced back 
through a long line of excellent citizens in America to the fifteenth century, 
and from that remote period to the present day they have been influential in 
whatever section of the republic they have honored by their residence. 

The subject of this sketch was born in Fountain count)', Indiana, Ma)- S, 
1851, and is a son of William B. and Jane C. (Carnahan) Van Der Volgen. 
The father was born near Schenectady, New York, and there he spent his 
boyhood days, emigrating to Jasper county, Indiana, in 1845, where he re- 
mained until 1866, when he came to Fountain county. He was a direct 
descendant of ancestors who came from Holland to our shores in the year 
1686, and settled in the locality of Schenectady, New Y r ork, and from that 
time to this the family has continued to reside in that vicinity of the old Em- 
pire state, and have thus witnessed its transition through all stages from the 
earliest days of Indian occupancy, in fact have witnessed the history-making 



558 



ID WARREN CO! ,1 



epochs of the nation. Upon his arrival in Fountain count) the father of the 
subject located in Richland township and there spent the rest of his life lie 
moved to Newtown in 1878, where his death occurred. He has a family of 
three children, name!) : Allien, of this sketch; Dr. William M., who lives in 
the state of Washington; Mar) I-'... who married \V. I). Gebhart, live in 
Richland township. "J parents of these above named children are both de- 
ceased, the father dying at tin age of >eventy-sis years and the mother at the 
age of sixty-six. Politically, he was a Republican. 

The immediate subject of this sketch grew to manhood on the home 
farm and he received a practical education in the common schools. In 1874 
he was married to Sarah Louise Campbell, daughter of Robert and Mary Jane 
(Scott) Campbell. The Campbells came from Pennsylvania, and the Suits 
from Virginia, both coming to Fountain county, Indiana, in an early daw 
For a fuller history of the Campbell family the reader is directed to the sketch 
of Herbert Campbell. 

Three children were born to the subject and wife, namely: Blanche mar- 
ried Murray Shultz, of Richland township; Edgar C. is a practicing dentist, 
of Crawfordsville, Indiana; Bertha married Ed. Scott, of Columbia City, 
Whitley county, this state. 

The subject is the owner of one hundred and twenty acres of excellent 
land in Richland township, which he has placed under a high state of cultiva- 
tion and improvement, and on which he carried on general farming and stock 
raising, fie has a commodious and attractive home, well furnis! ed, and' he 
also has a number of substantial outbuildings and modern farming imple- 
ments, and he always keeps a good grade of live stock — in fact, he has long 
made stock raising a specialty, handling pure bred Oxford Downs, all regisr 
tered stock, and because of their superior quality he finds a very ready mar- 
ket for them. He ships his fine stock all over the middle West into many dif- 
ferent states, always commanding fancy prices. He attends many county and 
state fairs with his fine sheep, and they are, always prize winners and are 
greatly admired by all who see them. He is regarded as one of the best judges 
of sheep in the country and he understands well their care and handling. 

Fraternally, Mr. Van Der Volgen is a member of the Knights of Pythias, 
Lodge No. 433, at Newtown, Indiana, and religiously, he belongs to the Pres- 
byterian church. He has been very successful in a business way, having been 
a good manager and by nature a man of sound judgment and foresight, and 
he stands high in the estimation of the people throughout Fountain county 
and wherever he is known, for he is a genial, hospitable and obliging gentle- 
man whose character has never been assailed, honesty and the Golden Rule 
having always been two of his principal virtues. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 55<> 

FRANK M. BEVER. 

The gentleman to a brief review of whose life and characteristics the 
reader's attention is herewith directed is among the favorably known and rep- 
resentative young business men of Fountain county, maintaining a popular 
mercantile establishment at Newtown, Richland township, lie has by his in- 
domitable nterprise ami prpgressive methods contributed in a material way 
t<> the advancement of his locality, and during the course of an hon 
career has been fairly successful, having always been a man of energy, sound 
judgment ami honesty of purpose, and is thus well deserving of mention in 
this volume. 

Frank M. Bever was born in Fountain count)-, Indiana, August iS. 1871. 
lie is the son of Alex and Elizabeth (farter) Bever, both also natives of this 
county, each representing pioneer families, and here the-)' grew to maturity, 
received their education and were- married, and spent their lives engaged in 
agricultural pursuits. Samuel Id. Bever, the paternal grandfather of the sub- 
ject, was one of the first settlers of Cain township, where he took up govern- 
ment land, which he developed into a good farm and there spent the rest of 
his life. 

Alex Bever. father of the subject of this sketch, resided in Davis town- 
ship a few years, then returned to the old home in Cain township, where he 
couth, led to reside, for a period of about twenty-live years, then lived in 
Hillsboro a year; he returned to the old homestead for a i^w years, thence to 
Waynetown, Montgomery county, where he lived retired, and there his wife 
died in December, 1903. Then he and his son and daughter moved to In- 
dianapolis ; his children married, and he then moved to Mellott, Richland 
township, Fountain county, where his death occurred on February 28, 1912, 
at the age of stnenty-six -ears, having been born in 1836. 

Alex Bever's family consisted of nine children, namely : Jennie, Elsie, 
Frank M., Anna, Carrie, Millie (deceased), Ora, James (deceased) and Sam- 
uel. 

Alex Bever was a Republican, and while he was active in the ranks he 
never held office. Fraternally, he belonged to the Masonic order and the 
Knights of Pythias. In religious matters he belonged to the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. 

Frank M. Bever, of this sketch, grew to manhood and was educated in 
his native county. He was married in 1893 to Phoebe Davis, daughter of 
Stephen and Lottie (Keller) Davis, these parents being early settlers of 









. 









560 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Fountain county, having located in Cain township. They arc now living in 
retiremi t in the village of Hillsboro. 

Frank M. Bever began life for himself on the farm, and continued that 
line of endeavor until 1902, when lie turned his attention to another field of 
effort, lmying out the store at Newtown owned by Horace Gray, and here he 
has remained to the present time, enjoying a large and ever-increasing trade, 
carrying a large and carefuly selected stock of goods, which would invoice 
from seven thousand to eighl thousand dollars at all seasons, lie has met with 
pronounced success. 

Mr. Bever and wife have two children, Zula, who married Leo Steele, a 
farmer, and Gladys, who lives at home. 

Fraternally, Mr. Bever was a member of the Knights of Pythias, and re- 
ligiously he belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church. 



J. WESLEY \Y i I1CKER. 

The family of which J. Wesley Whicker, of Attica, Indiana, is a repre- 
sentative, has been to a noteworthy degree connected with the history of this 
nation since its very foundation. Patriotism has been one of the most prom- 
inent characteristics of the family through several generations is evidenced in 
the fact that one ancestor was numbered among that sturdy, heroic band of 
patriots who threw off the yoke of the mother country and founded a new 
nation, whose foundation stone was liberty; another member of the family 
was found defending the national honor when England disputed our mari- 
time rights, and still later, when the hosts of armed rebellion threatened the 
national integrity, a member of the family was found in defense of the Stars 
and Stripes on the sanguinary battlefields of the Southland. Mr. Whicker 
has given unselfish and intelligent attention to the welfare of the community 
at large, having given his support to movements which have been of definite 
value in the progress and advancement of the county. 

The Whicker family of which the subject of this sketch is a representa- 
tive was originally of French Huguenot origin, having been established in 
America some time during the eighteenth century, the emigrants settling in 
South Carolina. That spirit of religious and civil freedom which had charac- 
terized the family as Huguenots remained with them in the fullest measure in 
their new home d when colonists asserted their independence none gave 
more devoted or loyal service to the cause than William Whicker, the sub- 




-J 



.!. YVKSL1CY WIIK'Kl'JK. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES; IM i 56) 

ject's great-grandfather, who gave seven yen- of his life to the cause of 
liberty. He was with Gen. Nathaniel Greene at the battle of Cowpens, Guil- 
ford Court Hoiise, North Carolina, being soon afterwards transferred to the 
command of Gen. George Washington, with whom he remained until the 
surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown, havii . undergone ail the hard- 
ships and privations which fell to the hit of thai immortal ami-.. He was a 
distiller by vocation and a prominent citizen of his community. The winter 
of 18J3-4 he .-pent hi Logan township, Fountain county, [ndiana, with his 
son Luke, being on a hunting trip. In 1830 he located in Delaware county, 
this state, and retired from active labor, having accumulated a competency. 
He always took a keen interest in public affairs and was a personal acquaint- 
ance from boyhood of Andrew Jackson, of whom he was a great admirer 
ami for whom he voted for President. William Whicker died in Delaware 
county, Indiana, on November 2, 1851, ai the advanced age of ninety-one 
years, two months and live days, and was buried in die Strain graveyard, 
near Albany, lie was the last Revolutionary soldier to die in the state of 
Indiana. He was a member of die Free and Accepted Masons, haying been 
made a Mason in historic Alexandria Lodge, of which Gen: George Wash- 
ington was worshipful master at the time, die date being some time during 
the war of the Revolution. William Whicker married Sarah 
whose home was three miles froi Guilford Couri [-louse, North ( arolina, 
and they became the parents of tin. following children: Mr-. Sarah, Fisher, 
who died in Delaware county. Indiana; Matthew, who .lie! in Grant county, 
Indiana; Asa and Luke died in Delaware county, Indiana; Mrs. Elizabeth 
Covert, and Bern', the subject's grandfather. 

Berry Whicker was born al Guilford Court House, North Carolina, 
and v as reared to the life of a farmer, which was his vocation through life. 
In 1834 he came to Fountain county, Indiana, buying land in Logan town- 
ship, to the cultivation of which he devoted himself. During the second war 
with England in 181 2 he enlisted for service and was a faithful defender of 
his country. Politically, he was an ardent Whig, while in religion he was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He married Lillice Campbell, a 
Quaker girl of Warren county, Ohio, and to them were born the following 
children: Luke, wdio for many years was engaged in the tombstone and 
monument business in Attica; George, father of the subject; Elizabeth, who 
became the wife of George Worthington; James and John, who operated the 
ferry at Independence for thirty years, or until the construction of a bridge 
at that point. 

(36) 



5^-2 i"; ITAIN A Nil WARREN COl NTIKS, LN'BIANA. 

George P. Whicker was born in Warren county, Ohio, on Augusl 25. 
'' 1 md in 1834 accompanied his parents on then removal to Fountah 
county, Indiana. Fie lived in Logan township during the remainder of his 
life, his death February 1. 1SS5. He was a brick maker and 

brick ma on a 

tica for many yea I the old buildin 

standing in that city having been built by him. Mr. YVhicker's maternal 
great-grandfather, George Worthington, settled in Davis town h 1 
coming an extensive landowner in Fountain, Warren and Mi 
ties, and who, in the year of his settlement, had built the first iv„niv house in 
the county. That this - .■■ well constructed is evidenced in the fact 

that it is still standing, on the O'Dell farm, now owned by John T, Nixon. 

George P. Whicker married Juliet A. Day, the daughter of i 
Anna (Worthington) -Day, who were natives of Preble county. 
the granddaughter of Ge irge Worthington, referred to in the preceding para- 
graph. To this union were horn the following children: Step] 

: Elizabeth, who became the wife oi 

ti si on what iv i, iown as the Shipps 

la Hinimelwright, of Vermilion county, Illinois; 

;ct of this sketch. '1 1 e parents of these children 

■ belief, while in politics the father was first a 
Whicker died on March 27, [900. 

rnship. Fountain count}'. Indiana, on March 26, 

horn in Logan townsl ip, Fountain county, In- 
After receiving his elementary education in the 
Riverside school in Logan township, he attended the high school at Attica for 
six months ami was also fur 'a like period in attendance at the State Normal 
School at Terre Haute. He was reared to the life of a farmer, which he fol- 
lowed for ten years, but later he turned his attention to the reading of law, 
which he carried on in connection with farming until he was thirty-two years 
old. On June 1, 1896, he associated himself with Arthur Yount in the prac- 
tice of law, the partnership ending on Octol)er 1st. after which Mr. Whicker 
remained alone for a year, at the end of which time he formed a partnership 
with Charles E. Bryant in law, real estate and farm loans, and two years 
lat. 1 bought the interest of his partner, who removed to St. Louis, and 
since 1 1 time Mr. Whicker has carried on the business alone. 

A> a lawyer Mr. Whicker has won a reputation as a safe and sound prac- 
titioner. He is the owner of three hundred and sixty acres of land, which com- 



at the agi 




Shipps] ; 


died in I 


farm; James, whi 




J. \\ esley, the irni 




were Spiritualist 




Whig and then a 




She was born in 


Richland u 


i833. 




J. Wesley N 


/kicker wa 


.liana, on August 


17, 1863. 



I. ii - I WIN Us'D WARREN COUNTIES, fNDIANA. 563 

a portion of the original farm bought by Berry Whicker, upon which 
Mark Whicker now lives, and has been owned and operated by the family 
sine.' its purchase in 1834, the greater p ["0 

him as much a? any • ther one man ivas due the inauguration of the movi 
in Fountain county 1 pul irovement — indeed, it can be truthfully 

said that he 1' I man in this pan of the state to make 1 defin 

successful figlil for good roads, lie easily make ' I tcquaintances 

and is well liked throughout the community. 

On J\)n^' (). [903, Mr. Whicker was united in marriage with Gertru ■ 
Arms, the 'laughter of Solon H. and Diana (Kell) Arms. She is a lady ul 
many pleasing qualities of head and heart and is a popular member of the 
social circles in which she moves. 

Politically, Mr. Whicker has been a life-long - Republican, hen.;; now 
identified with the Progressive '/arty. Fraternally, he is a member of the 
Fre and Accepted Masons. Order of the Eastern Star, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, Knights ol Pythias, Improved Order of Red .Men. Modern 
\\ op.dmen of America. Royal Neighbors and the Sons of the American Revo- 
lution. 



A. E. McFERREN. 

While yet young in year-, A. E. McFerren, well known and successful 
merchant of Warren township, has proved what one can accomplish if his 
ambition, his energy and his thought are directed in the right channel and he 
deal< fairly and in a straightforward manner with his fellow men. He has 
deserved his large and increasing success and is a man who has always been 
well thought of in this locality. He has a modern stock of drugs and a gen- 
eral store. 

Mr. McFerren was born in Independence, Warren county, Indiana, 
April 11, 1881, and he has been content to spend his life in his native com- 
munity, rather than seek uncertain fortune in other fields. He is the son of 
Joseph and Lydia (Edmonds) McFerren. 

The father of the subject was born in Fountain county, this state, and 
there spent his earlier days. When a young man he started a small store 
which, by his persistence and good management, finally grew to one of the 
largest and most popular stores in his native county, and he was a man of in- 
fluence in his community, being well liked and respected. His family con- 
sisted of three children, Frank, A. E. (the subject) and Walter. 



564 FOUNTAIN AND \\ \RREN COT NTIESj INDIANA. 

A. E. McFarren grew to manhood in his native community and he re- 
ceived a fairly good common school education. When a boy he decided to 
follow iii the footsteps of his father in a business way and worked with him 
m the store, soon becoming familiar with the in-- ai nits of merchandising. 
He took a pharmacy course and became a registered pharmacist, one of the 
few in this county. He has a neat and well arranged store it fncL , 
which is widely patronized. He carries a large and carefully selected stock of 
drugs and sundries, in connection with a general stock of goods, a 
built up a splendid trade in all departments and is one of the progressive and 
successful young merchants and business men of the county. 

Air. McFcrren was married on Septemher 9, 1009. to Delia Bever, 
daughter of Charles and Ellen (Tyler) Bever. Two children have b 
to the subject and wife. Beatrice Josephine and Arnetta Jeniece. 

Fraternally, Mr. McFerren belongs to the Masonic order, the Indepen 
dent Order of Odd Fell- .us and the improved Order of Red Men. 



BERLE EMERSON GLOVER. 

One of the best known men in Fountain county, who commands the 
respect of a host of friends and acquaintances among whom he h ived and 
labored, is the gentleman whose name appears at the head of this sketch, who 
has spent his energies through a life of strenuous labor to make the most of 
his opportunities. In all the relations of life he has proved signally true to 
every trust. He possesses a sociable nature and by his genial and kindly 
atti ude to those about him, he has won the respect and confidence of every 
one. He is known as a careful and able business man and one whose integrity 
of purpose is beyond question. 

The subject of this sketch is descended from a line of sterling ancestry, 
being a grandson of William and Katherine (Walker) Glover, both of whom 
were early settlers in the Hoosier state, having come to Fountain county in 
the pioneer period. He located northwest of Veedersburg, where he created 
a splendid farm and also engaged in hauling grain, timber and merchandise 
from Veedersburg and Lafayette to Chicago. His death occurred in 1848, 
being the result of being injured by the giving away of a floor on which he 
and about fifty others were standing, a beam pinning him to the earth and 
breaking his back, his death occurring about twentv-four hours later. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 565 

Katherine Walker Glovei was the .laughter of William Walker, who 
moved from eastern Indiana to Fountain county in an early day and took 
upon himself the task of creating a home out of the wilderness. In tins he 
succeeded, becoming well-to-do and standing high in g. h ral esteem. Will- 
iam and Kathenue Glover had eight children, namely. Elizabeth, James, 
Almira, Savannah, Prudence, William M., Alan and Indiana. 

Of the children just named, William M., who is the father of the sub- 
ject i)f this sketch, was bora in Fountain county on June 15, 1841, and was 
reared to the lite of a farmer. He received his education in the common 
schools and his years were devoted to the pursuit of agriculture and Stock 
r; ing until his retirement from the farm, when he became associated with a 
son-in-law in a general store in Veedersburg. Some years later he quit the 
mercantile business and returned to his farm. A few years later he again 
i"' :ti ed from active farm life and removed to Veedersburg, where he is now 
residing. 

On January iS, 1863, he married .Mary E. Coffing, whose birth oc- 
curred on March 21, 1843, and whose father; Andrew Coffing, ivas a native 
of Four, ain county. They became the parents of the following children: L. 
Burton, deceased; Elmer, who married, first, Mattic Smith, and, second. 
Emma Quiggle; Delia, the wife of William Barkley, near Osborne Prairie; 
Anna, the wife of I. A. Crane, of Veedersburg; George S., whose sketch ap- 
pears elsewhere in this work; Abbie M. is the widow of the late S. Boatman; 
James A., a farmer near Osborne Prairie, married Anna Wolf; Berle E. is 
the immediate subji :i if this r i Paul H., a twin of Berle. died in early 

life. 

Politically, William Glover is a Republican, fraternally, a member of 
the Knights of the Maccabees, and in religion he is a member of the Christ- 
ian church. 

Berle E. Glover was born in Troy township, Fountain county. Indiana, 
on July 31, 1882. He secured his elementary education in the common schools, 
attending one year in the high school at Covington and also taking a year's 
study in normal work. He then attended the Indianapolis Business College, 
where he graduated in 1901. Securing a position as bookkeeper with the 
Brown-Ketcham Iron Company, at Indianapolis, he remained with that large 
concern about three years, at the end of which time he came to Veedersburg 
and during the past eight years has been associated with his brother George 
in the dry goods business, first in a clerical capacity and later as a partner, 
now owning a one-third interest in the store. His good business training and 
natural qualifications have made him a valuable factor in the growth and 



5C6 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, [NDIANA. 

development of the business here, the store now ranking with Lhe best of the 
kind in : e county. Mr. Glovei is affable and courteous in his dcalin vith 
e isil) make and retains friends. 

Politically, Mr. Glo party, ii 

ol \< hicli he is intei f not a er public ol 

However, he was at one time th incumbent of the position ol 

clerk, to whirl; he was appointed to fill a vaca'i diarge 

of his cial eminentl) satisfactory to his fellow citizei 

■ ht ; - a member of the New Light Christian church. Fraternally, h 
Fret and Accepted l Vecdersburg and Lodge 

No. 493 and the Uniform Rank. Knights of Pythias, also at Veedersburg. tie 
lias held official positions in these bodies and in October. 1912, he was a dele- 
gal 1 the Pythian gram; lodge, winch met al Indianapolis. He is also a 
tin: -r of the Modern Woodmen of America. 

In 1907 Mr. Glo was united in marriage to Sadie A. Ouiggle, the 
daughter of John . : I ggli . and to them have keen born three chil- 

dren, Herbert, Robert Lee and June Alberta. Air. and .Mrs. Glover move 
in the best social circles in the community and because of their genial dispo- 
sitions and genuine worth they enjoy a 1 ar-> acquaintance and Lhe loyal 
friendship of all who know them. 



J RESTLEY THOMPSON McKINNEY. 

The subject of this sketch was an honored and respected citizen of Foun- 
tain county, and was born at New Carlisle, Ohio, on October 31, 1809, where 

he spent his boyhood and early manhood. His great-grandfather was one of 
five brothers who emigrated to America from Scotland and settled in Ken- 
tuck)'. The father of the subject of this sketch was Samuel McKinney, who 
married Sarah Forgey in the year 1802. To them were born ten children, six 
of whom grew 7 to manhood and womanhood, namely: Betsey (Airs. Morris), 
Susan (Mrs. Stafford), Robert, William, Cyrus and the subject. Samuel 
McKinney was a farmer and music teacher, owning a valuable little farm, 
where lie reared his family, all of whom became honored and useful citizens 
P. T. McKinney began teaching school at the age of eighteen near the 
old home place, where he continued to teach school and the old style music 
classes, until 1833, when he came to Newtown, Indiana, where he taught in 
the old log school house, which was among the first built in the county. The 



FOUNTAIN am> \v.\k;:i;.\ O 567 

next year, on May 15. 1834, h was ma I ister of the 

late James McClure, and daughter of William McClure, and took up farming 
as his life work, pun ha iing the easl half of th( west half >f section 9, town- 
ship 20, range 6 west, where he lived until his death, on September 8, 1874.' 
To this niori wen lildn a, tw< • s< • 

VVilliau who g from Wabash 

served his country ■ I ompany I, Fifteenth ' 1 If ! 

was born in 1835 and died in January, 4; Siu 

years; Esther, born in 1838, and who acher, 

married Carlton Dryden, at Keithsburg, tllinois, and to them was born one 
daughter, Luella, who died in [9 of George Slingluff. Mr. Dryden 

served with distinction throughout the Civil war and never failed once to 
stack ai us with his company. Mr. Dryden and wife removed to Burlington, 
Iowa, soon after their marriage, where Esther died in December, [903; Eliza- 
beth, born in 1S40, married O. K. V\ .oldiei in the war of the Rebel- 
lion, who died in 1877 a( - Burlin , and to them were born sever 
children who died in infancy, and one dai ghter, Ma r in the Bur- 
lington schools ; Elizabeth died ii ry, born in 1843, married James 
Armstrong, of Toledo. Ohio, where they have since resided. To them were 
born three sons, Irvin, who died in infancy. Edwin, a prominent physician of 
Sylvania, Ohio, and Elton, a successful business man of Toledo, Ohio. Mr. 
Armstrong died in 19 c 1. 

In 1S48, Mrs. Sarah McKinney died, and in 1855 Mr. McKinney was 
united in marriage to Catherine McClure, daughter of Nathaniel and Mary 
(B ver) McClure. Her parents were married in Virginia in 1804, lived many 
years in southern Ohio, and moved to Montgomery county, Indiana, in 1838. 
Nathaniel McClure's father, Alexander McClure, was of Scotch descent, a 
Revolutionary soldier and served through the entire war in the Eighteenth 
Regiment United States Volunteers, and is said to have been promoted to (he- 
rank of colonel. (See Pension Records, state of Virginia, Montgomery county. 
in State Library.) By this union Mr. McKinney became the father of three 
children, two sons and one daughter, namely: Frank E., born May 10, 1854; 
('harks R., born January 24, 1857, and Eva L., born January 5, 1859. ln 
1880, Frank E. married Belle Harvey, a daughter of Eli B. and Catherine 
(Atchison) Harvey, the latter a soldier in the Civil war, serving in Company 
D, Thirtieth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and to them were horn two children, 
Homer and Grace. Homer graduated from Wabash College with the class of 
1907, and soon after married Margaret Davidson, daughter of Doctor David- 
son, of Crawfo. Isville, Indiana; Charles R. married Mary E. Miller in 



568 FOUNTAIN AMi WAR1 I IS, INDIANA. 

1884, daughter of Jared and Jeannelte (McPherson) Miller, who were of 
Scotch descent, but themselves natives ol New York stale. The) moved to 

ity, ars after marriage, ami leared up 

whei years. Charles R. McKin 

with five children, one son and four daughters, namely: 
Lela Fern, Hazel S., Georgia and Gladys. Glenn grai m Wabash 

College in the class of 1909, married Re\ 

and took up farmin cupation; Fern graduated from the W< 

Collegi and is now teaching; Hazel died in 19 

the age of twelve years; Eva L. was married in January, 1887, to William 
Milligan, who is a successful far ei ■' VVaveland, Indiana. To them were 
born tour children, two sons ai two d ., 'iters, namely: Clarence. Mar}', 
Mabel and Elton. Mrs. MilHgan, who was a public school teacher before her 
marriage, lied on September 4. 1912. There are two great-grandchildren, 
Donald, sou 01" Dr. Edwin at; itrong, and Lawn :e, son of Glenn E. Mc- 
Kinney. 

P. T. McKinne} was litics and for si /eral years was 

trustee of Richland township, lie was an elder in the Presbyterian church at 

New town from its organization until his death. His sons, Frank and Charles 

R., each own a good farm and 1 farmers. Charles R. was a 

I teacher i 

After Mr. McKinnej 's death his i with her sons on the 

farm until her death, which occurred in Deceml 



HERMAN W. BRIGGS. 

Well directed efforts in the practical affairs of life and his capable man- 
agement of his fine farms in Jordan, Pine, Liberty and Warren townships, 
Warren county, have brought a well deserved prosperity to Herman W. 
Briggs. whose career demonstrates forcibly what may be accomplished by any 
man of energy and ambition who is not afraid to work and has the persever- 
ance to continue his labors in the face of any discouragements which may 
seem to arise. In all the relations of life he has commanded the respect and 
confidence of those with whom he has been brought into contact and a bio 
graphical history of this locality would need to contain his record should it 
profess to be complete. 

The parents of the subject are John H. and Helena (Van Reed) Briggs. 



FOUNTAIN AN'ii WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 569 

The Briggs family is an old and well known one in this part of I 
paternal grandfather, Alexander Brigg . having lived for main years and 
died in Warren county, John M. Briggs was bom Januarj i, 1848, in War- 
ren county, Indiana, and his death occurred on August 27, 1908. Tin 
ject's mother, win iovi makes her home with him, was born in Warren 
county on March 13, 185-'. The lather iwned fifteen hundred aires of 
Warren county land and he a] farming 

and stock raising, in which he was emini I To him and his 

:t of this sketch and Aland, win. is de- 

ctol ;. 1873. in Warren 
ihools, supplementing this prel 
>c''auw Universities, thus receiving a 
;voted himself assiduously to the man- 
re eon! iv,l of which, since his father's 
lie is no the owner oi seventeen 
found in tins section of the state, the 
A arren township 

fter details easily, he has al- 
ready demonstrated an 1 tl i tratioii, audi he is perpet- 
uating the record of jurated Practically all of 
the land is under cultivation and em of fanning is c; 
on, proper attention also being given t" the raising of live stock, which lias 
been found to be a very profitable source of income. Mr. Briggs is 1 
tionally well equipped for life's duties and is making an excellent record in 
his life work. He is regarded as one of the best young fanners in the county, 
; rid it would be hard to find one more .scientific, a part of his education having 
been along specific lines in which he is now interested in a business way. 

On November 22, 1899. Mr. Briggs was married to Louise Reed, who 
was born in Fountain county, Indiana, on August 16, 1877, tne daughter of 
Joseph and Emma (Coggins) Reed. Mrs. Briggs, who was a lady of unus- 
ual qualities of character and who enjoyed the esteem of a large crirle of 
friends, passed to the silent land on January 16, 1912. In her girlhood she 
had received a good common school education and later took special training 
at Coates College. 

Politically, Mr. Briggs is a Republican, but has never sought public 
office, though at all times taking an intelligent interest in public affairs. 
Religiously, he is a member of the Presbyterian church, to the support of 
which society he gives liberally. Fraternally, he is a member of the lodge of 



wife were 


born t 


WO children 


. the 


si 


ceased. 










Hern 


lan W 


. Briggs w; 


is bo 




H( ttti mlcd the 








study by 


attendance at Pur 


du. 


an 


i -oad and 


libera] 
if the 1 


education. 


He 

es, tl 


h; 
te 
Id 


land lying 


tl Jof 


dan, Pin-. ; 


Liber 




executive 


ability 


and the f: 


icult) 





570 FOUNTAIN AND U \.RKKN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

LJenevolcnl and Protective Order 01 Elks af Attica. He is also a Free and 
Accepted Mason, having attained to the thirty-second degree in the Vncient 
Accepted Scottish Rite at Indianapolis. Personally, Mi G genial and 

ppr< achahle, so that he has easil) won Frie 
arc in numl er as his acquaintances. 



LEW KF.U" 



A representative of one of the ; >' rid influential families of F 

county is Lew Kerr, for in the social and private - n 1 

more enviable ret tation for sterling worth lewhat 

lass that direct and control public sentiment with >ut pushing them 
forward and without incurring the ill will of those with whom they come in 
contact and leave the impress of their onality indelibly stamped 

upOn the community, winning the friendship of all clas es. 

Mr. Kerr ,vas born in Richland township, Fountain county. Indiana, 
July ii, 1807, and is the sou of Brazilla M. and Eliza (Griffith) Kerr. The 
father was born in Ohio and there -pen; ife, finally com 

tain county, Indiana, and here became well esl ' . an interest 

in public affairs and was at one time county commissioner. His family con- 
sisted of three children, namely: John G. and Ira, both deceased; Lew, of this 
sketch. 

Josiah Kerr, paternal grandfather of the subject, came to Fountain 
county in pioneer da}'S and settled north of Newtown, where the subject now 
lives, buying eight hundred acres from Mrs. Romick, and he was one of the 
leading farmers in this part of the county during his day and generation. 

Lew Kerr grew to manhood on the home place and he received his educa 
tion in the common schools of his neighborhood. On March 26, 1889, he 
was united in marriage to Rhoda Cooper, daughter of Charles and Mary 
(Blakely) Cooper. Grandfather Blakely was a native of Scotland, from 
which country he came to America in an early day and settled in Chicago. 
He was a mason by trade and he did many very large jobs. Ue worki 
eighteen months on one doorway in a large building in Liverpool. Later in 
life he went to Merom, Sullivan county, Indiana, where he worked on the 
Union Christian College. The father of Mrs. Kerr also settled in the town 
of Merom, and there spent the rest of his life, as did also the grandfather 
after he finished his job on the college. 



FOUNT;\IjN AjN IJ WAURKN C01 ill DIANA. 

Tluv. children liavi i I i VIr. an I M I < i namely: Brazilh 

is deceased; Ruth and Cooper are al home. 

Pol VI r. KJ rr is a R« publican, an advocal of the pi ■ 

: t} lie has alw a; en considers ; ocal public 

;ut has iu-ver held office. Religi aisly, he - 
byterian < hurch, of v\ Inch he ! :c< Til-. 

Mr. Kerr is the owner of a linel) improved md i- inn of 01 

hundri and I went} - four acres, e fn 

Newtown, in the eastern pan of Fountain c unty. He has kepi 
(which his grandfather settled in an nd so 

well cared for in a general way that it hi rial strength of soil 

Fraternally, Mr. Kerr is a member of tl Independc 
lows, Lodge No. 171 at Newtown. 

Charles Coop r, father of Mrs. Kerr, was born in Virginia, and his wife 
orn in Liverpool, England. From there she came to America wil 
parents and settled in Chicago. Mrs. Ke 's mother is living in VTerom, In- 
diana, now advanced in year.-. 



[RA A] ' 



That an American farm offers opportunities for a happy, contented and 
independent life is shown by examination into the conditions surrounding the 
homes of very many Fountain county farmers, among them he whose name 
beads this review. Though his farm is not of the largest be is one who is 
realizing the lesson of modern agriculture; that it is intensive farming which 
is profitable; that the same amount of work applied to a few acres yields a 
much larger return than if applied to many; that every bit of additional care 
given to a crop or a faun brings a double profit, while the owner of a smaller 
farm is not compelled to earn so large an interest on his investment, nor held 
to so great a burden of upkeep. So he has found his farm much more 
profitable than many larger, and much less expensive. 

Ira Alonzo Head was born on the old homestead where he now lives on 
March 9, 1S72, the son of Richard and Lucy (Landers) Head. His parents 
were natives of Bullitt county, Kentucky, who came to Fountain county. In 
diana, in 1862, rented land al first, and finally bought the farm where the sub- 
ject was born and now lives. Richard Head was a cabinet-maker ly trade, 
But devoied bis time to farming while in Fountain county. He died in [901, 



572 I M '■: VND W A.RB " -. INDIANA. 

aged seventy-six; his wife died in 1888, aged fifty-four. They were the par- 
ents of nine children: William T., a tanner oi Hendricks county; Samuel I!.. 
a fanner, who died on June j 1 . 1912; Man, deceased, the wife of Clinton 
Royal; James, a farmer, who died when twenty-eight; George, superinten- 
dent of a wholi sal grocery, of Colorado Springs, Colorado; John, who died 
at the age of fourteen; Charles, a farmer of the San Luis Valley, Colorado; 
and Ira A ■' 

Mr. Head attended the schools of Rob Roy and Lafayette, and has since 
followed tanning. Me ua- run \ 1. 1895, to Laura Han 

daughter of William Harris, of Shawn - this county. The 

two children, Louis, born J ul> 14, 1896, and Lida, born Vpril 24, [901. He 
is the ownei :ile land, whi 

improved by his father. In politics he is a Dei : is now superinten- 

dent of gravel roads in Ins count}'. He and his family are mem 
Union Christian church and, takt their full rch work. He is a 

member of the Horse Thief Di ■ and. fraternally, is one 

of the Odd Fellows, of the Modern Wo dmen of America 1 id of the Elks. 
He is a man whose man) excellent qualities of good fellowship have made 
for him many friends, and he is well known and well liked in his section of 
the count}'. 



FRED HOLTZ. 

Fred Holtz is of German descent and, like so man)- of that nationality, 
he has made himself of much importance in his community by being thrifty, 
honest and industrious, and building up his own business to such a high 
standard that his good judgment and business sagacity is highly respected. 
He is a dealer in feed and coal in Williamsport, Warren county. Indiana, and 
one of its most substantial and prominent citizens. 

Fred Holtz was born January 27, 1870, in Williamsport, on .Monroe 
street. I lis father was Jacob Holtz and his mother, Frederica (Meitzler) 
Holtz. They were both born in Germany, his mother being born in Maucken, 
anil his father probably near the same place. They came to this country in 
their youth, and were married near Attica, Indiana, Jacob Holtz having re- 
ceived his education in Germany. They raised a family of eight children. 
One child died in infancy, and Catherine. William and Elizabeth are also 
dead. Charles, George, Lena and Fred Holtz are living. Fred Holtz was 
born and raised in the city of Williamsport, receiving his education there. 



FOUNTAIN ixn WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 573 

During his vacation he worked, as he was always very industrious, and often 
went into the country in the -; mm< ed on his mother's farm. In 

1887, at the age of seventeei . he went into busines for himself, and kepi a 
grocery for about two year- At the end of that time h ' oul a verj 
thriving establishment, to take up his new duties Hi 

at that time, in the face of very strong competition. The were eight candi- 
dates for the place, and it was finally decided to put the question before the 
people and permit them to choose their own postmasti r. I Ik as that 

Fred Holtz, though the youngest of the candidates, was chosen, bc-cai 
his well-known ability, his sterling qua! This 

was during Cleveland's second term as 
candidate running at that time. 

After holding this position for torn years with great ere- lit to himself 
and his party, he entered into the coal and feed business, beginning modestly, 
and has made a very marked uccess. He now has a flourishing bus 1 
Mr. Holtz was married in 1906 to Minnie Alberta Anderson, I 
their wedding being May 10th. They have one child, Charles F. Holtz, who 
is three years old. His wife is the daughter of James and Mai 
(Gramcs) Anderson. James Anderson was a farmer and lived in Prairie 
township, where he was a targe land owner and one of th 
citizens. 

Mr. li of the thoroughly reli e made Will- 

ianisport grow. He is a member of thi urch and is a 

Knight Of Pythias. I is energetic and progressive, and anxious to see his 
native town enjoy .11 the municipal improvements possible. It is men of his 
stamp, of which there are so many among the Germans, that add substan- 
tiality to a community, and make it progressive in government, business meth- 
ods and social life. 



JOHN F. RITENOUR. 

Warren county has long been favored in the personnel of its public 
officials, a rule to which the present efficient and popular clerk of the circuit 
court is no exception. John F. Ritenour, the incumbent of that office, is a 
native of Warren county, Indiana, and dates his birth from the 4th day of 
June, 1878, having first seen the light of day in the beautiful little cit) of 
which he has been a life-long resident. Henry Ritenour, father of the sub- 
ject, also of Hoosier birth and a native of Warren county, was a teacher b\ 



57-1 FOUNTAIN \\l> WAfi 01 ' : . INDIANA. 

profi ■ ion and foi in 113 years actively id< ntifii d ■■. ith Lhc edn itional intcrc %ls 

of his pari of die state. He taught a number of years in dil 

and villages of the 1 mty and in 1N74 - Led 1 unty superinl 

schools, the duties Inch position he disch 

to the satisfaction of the puhli 1 very capable and 

Later he was made deputy o ed a num- 

bei :ai ind wli h post he as hi Wing when his deadi occu 

She was n 
and educated in v a • of beautiful life ai 

- -• si iciet) cin li 
iamsport, especially tin ingei people who have ever found her a kind a id 
gracious hostess wh iii ["he paternal g 

father of the subjeel was Frederick Ritenour, a nal land and one 

pioneer settlers of Warren county. He migrated to fndiana when the 
savage still roamed the forests, in due time secured land, which he convei ed 
into a good farm and a comfortable home and bore his full share in tli 
velopment and subs* ,\ih of the pari of the country in which he 

located. He died many years ago and left I h descen 
of a useful life and honorable name. 

The early year- of John F. Ritenour ivere passed in hi n ! 
the public schools of which he received his preliminary ■ After 

being graduated from the higli school I for- 

mal [Jniversi y at Valparaiso v ■ k tin full classical course and 

Lrned an honorable reputatiou as a student, having stood among the first in 
his classes and demonstrated marked ability in his studies and investigations. 

On leaving the above institution, Air. Ritenour turned his attention to 
educational work and during the several years ensuing, taught in the country 
districts and later taught his last terms in the graded schools of Williamsport, 
shortly after the close of which he was chosen assistant cashier in the Will- 
iamsport State Bank, the duties of which position he discharged with credit 
to himself and to the entire satisfaction of the management of the institution 
for a period of six years. A scholar and thinker, Mr. Ritenour very naturally 
became interested in public affairs and took pains to keep himself well informed 
on the great questions before the people and in close touch with the trend of 
thought on matters political. Believing the principles of the Republican party 
to be for the best interest-, of the body politic he gave them his earnest and 
uncompromising support and it was not long until he forged to the front a: 
one of the influential young politicians of the county. He rendered valuable 
service to his party, both as an adviser in its councils and a worker in the 



< UN AND. WAUREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 57s 

ranks, in recognition of which, as will as by reason of hi.s fitness i <r the posi 
tion, he vva : 11 uninated in February, 1910 for the office of clerk of tli ^ 
circuit court, 1 r t a pi ipular man « hi ■ sli m id « ell w ith his ] 

Mi. Ritein nr mad< an iclive can • iss, dur 
tig ■. hich he \ isil .1 i", 1 r) pai I • 1" the coun able nn 

untried thai h< thoi 

vantag< Notwithstanding the strength and popularity ol Ins competitoi 
Ritem air was elected by a 1 ire than the n 

Republican vote and gre : that of the opposition lie entered 

he disi ' rg< 1 if his offii ial du ■ , and thus fa 

coursi I illj ets the expect >ns of h 1 and th : general public and 

justii hi wisdom of the part) in his election. Capable, painstaking and 
cou II who ha he has air. -a:]) wen 

thi lence oi his felL d if pari 1 i.t is the 

gene 1 has ne\ er been filled by an ablei 

Mr, Ritenoi ■, on ■ ■;. 1901, was united 

n; the acco Calvin and \dah (< >gborn 1 Citizen, 

; : 1 ; eing a contractor for various 

if cement woi k and a suo e d rs. Ritenour 

r, Esther M., 1 
shine of the household, 

Fraternally, Air. Ritenour is a member of tin der and at tin 

present time, is junior warden of the lodge to whi al - 

identified with the Independent Order of Odd ing a trustee ol 

lodge, and he has been through all the chairs of the Knights of Pythias lodge 
which holds his membership and is now filling the office oi treasurer of the 
same. Religiously, he subscribed to the Presbyterian creed and belongs 
with his wife to the local church in Williamsport, being a member of it- board 
of trustees. 

Mr. Ritenour has one brother living, Jacob, older than himself, who is a 
farmer of Warren township; Fred, his son, is the deputy in the clerk's office. 
Thus, in rather a cursory manner, have been set forth the leading facts in the 
life of one of Warren county's most enterprising and up-to-date citizens and 
accomplished officials. In closing this brief sketch it is needless to Mate that 
he combines the sterling qualities which win success and gain the good will 
and applause of his fellow men, or that he occupies a place in the respect and 
confidence of the public record in importance to men of his contemporaries. 
Vigorous in action, resolute of purpose and with a will that hesitated at no 



576 

opposing circumstances, he has made his | 

neighbor and citizen e is held 

|r all nditi I I ' faithfully, ean 

'' ' ■ '. 

'■ is he is iw thi 

'■■ it -til! higher horn trs await 



A. L. RATGLJ] 



lie whose name 


init 


old and honor 




the time of hi 




one of t! 




himself, beir.;.. 




large patron;! 
his devotion 1 




vanced and-'pr 

honor. 




A. L. Ratcliff x 


vas 1 


He is a i' oH ' 




old family of this o 




Creek towt 




taught two t( r 




leaving college he t 


augli 


schools one year : at 


Xe 



ice, al th 



Mill 



i 94. He 
the rural distri I ' oi g ... After 

several years, being principal of the ifeddo 
lanon, one year; at Ah m, two years, and lie 
taught at Rossville, one year, and at Gates, three years. lie taught mathe- 
matics in the High school at Sullivan two years. He was very successful as a 
teacher and became one of the most sought-after and prominent teachers in 
this section of the state., and, no doubt, if he had continued in this field of 
endeavor he would have become one of the leading educators of the stale. 
He kept fully abreast of the times in school work, was an excellent organizer 
and disciplinarian and his record everywhere he was employed is a most 
commendable one. But he had decided upon a medical course, and all the 
while he was engaged in teaching he devoted his spare horns to perusing med- 
ical treatises and standard text books. Finally he gave up teaching and 
entered the Illinois Medical College in 1898. He made an excellent record 




G. dC^^Mf- 



577 

and was graduated from thai 

ere he has sin of his 

■ 
the ■ I ■ 11 that 

i I i 
tionc! 

I 
daughter of Prof. B 

ther being one of tin To 

the Doctor and wifi en have bee) I 

August 10 n October - ; 1897; Henry, 

born Noveml Frank mi, born November 6, 1904; Ca 

.' March 23, 1909 ; Howard Loren, bom March 12, 1911. 
Dr. Ratcliff is a member of the Pleasant Grove Christian church. He 
is a Republican and was formerly president of the school board at Kingman. 
Fraternally, he belongs to the Masons, Knights of Pythias and the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. I le is a member of the Fountain and Warren 
Counties Medical Associations and the. Indiana State Medical Association. 
Dr. Ratcliff has been very successful in a business way and he is the owner of 
a line and well improved farm of one hundred and si a< res. 



ER E. McKI 

The blood of the Scotch Highlanders has made one of the strongest and 
most enduring strains in the lite of the American people. Where you find 
the Scotch name you may find that sterling integrity which' always passes 
without question, together with a kindliness and justice that endears itself to 
those who fall under its influence. One of the best known names in Warren 
county is McKinzie, and Elmer E. McKinzie, who has given it such promin- 
ence there, stands, not only for the name of his Scotch ancestors, but exempli- 
fies their candor, honest)' and justice. 

Mr. McKinzie was born in Warren township, Warren county, Indiana, 
on June 17, 1873, the son of John T. and Josephine (Banes) McKinzie. 
John T. McKinzie was a native of Ohio, and came to Indiana in 1850 with his 
father, Andrew Jackson McKinzie. They settled on a farm in Adams town- 
ship, Warren county, where they both lived all their lives. Both L'Jmer E. 
McKinzie's father and grandfather were farmers, coming here when the 

(37) 



5/8 OVNTJ 

country was just being opened up and claiming the Ian ilturc from 

the for* Liidrew Jackson McKinzie's father, the great-grand fathei of 

1 I ■ .- i was a full-bl led Scotchman. Elmer E. McKinzie's 

oateni I Saliie \nn Wallace of Delaware; she and her hus- 

band b 'Mi 1895 and she in [904. John 

with his v. i fe, w In ■ 
was |ose| ch ldren : I firam W. 

: .^o; William town- 

ship Pel ~~: Axtdie, who ivas born Septci 

of Charles B. McAdams and lives nea 1 pa its in Warren tow 1 

I 
21, 1882: Anna, who v he wife of Ja Stacl a mei I 1a it oj li 

pendence, Indiana, was born November 17. [884; Laura - . 
r8, r 888, and married Earl Stacl liana ■ th 

Stacker Bro : Bertha, ,vho was born Ma] \. [893, is the wife of Th 
Crane, of Warren township; Elmer E. McKinzie is the desl 
mother was a daughter of Watson Banes, a native of Ohio, who came I 1 
Indiana about the time that the McKinzie famil] moved Warren county, 
and they settled in Pine township, near Rainsville, which was then the 
ing town in the county. 

Ellin:. 
wards attended the State Normal School at Terre Haute Indiana, for three 
months, lie lived on Lhe farm until he was twentj years n went 

to V inthi ']•. Indiana, and, after clerking in a gem ' foi two years, 

went into business for himself. He kept this general store for three years, 
and then sold out and moved to Williamspi t in 1895. Here he clerked in a 
store for about two years, and again went into business for himself, buying 
a partnership in a grocery store with Roy Judy. After staying here two 
years, he sold out to his partner and commenced clerking again. He mm mi 
went to Attica, Indiana, and became the ;ent for the Standard Oil Company, 
which position he retained for about a year and a half. Mr. McKinzie then 
returned to Williamsport, and after clerking in a hardware store there for 
two years, became assistant postmaster at that place. Beginning in January, 
1905, he held this office for five years, and served the public so well dur- 
ing that time that he was appointed postmaster January 20, 1910, by Presi- 
dent Taft. 

On November 15, 1892, Elmer E. McKinzie married Emma I. aura Dove, 
daughter of Christopher and Mary Ann (McKinney) Dove, who was born in 
1870. Christopher Dove was a native of Fountain county, Indiana, where 



'OUN'I 


AJN AN 


linenl 


. He \ 


ian cl 


lurch. 



REN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 579 

fanner and a school teacher, and a mem 
ber of the Christian church. He was a veteran of the Civil war, and died in 
1893. Mary Ann Dove was also born in Foil itain county, and is .-till living, 
making her home with Elmer E. McKinzie and her daughter. She was also 
the mother of Jasper X. and James II. Dove. Jasper lives in Liberty town- 
ship, Warren county, and lame.- lives in Granl county, near Marion, Indiana. 

Elmer E. and .Man' Ann McKinzie have two boys: Lawrence D. was 
born August 7, 1.894, and will graduate from high school in the ela- of 
[913; Lloyd A. was horn October 8, [898, and is also a student in hig 

.Mr. .McKinzie is a Mason, being a member of the blue lodge at Will 
iamsport. He is also a member of the Knights of Pythias. He is a Repub 
lican. His mother's people were Quakers, and Mr. McKinzie has inherited 
the high moral standards of that sect. Mr. McKinzie is highly regarded by 
all who know him, and respected by the entire community. His word is as 
good as a bond among ! is neighbors and friends, ami his daily life exemp 
the highest moral precepts. 



THOMAS C. POWELL. 

Though a number of our best men gave their lives in die cause of liberty, 
and many who could not call this their native land were just as loyal, many 
of those who fought in the Civil war were able to return and take up again 
the round of civic life, giving to their private lives, and homes, the benefit 
of their experience as men whohad been through those paths in life uni- 
versally regarded as most terrible. Among those who returned from this 
great civil strife was Thomas C. Powell, of Williamsport, Indiana, a retired 
farmer and one of the foremost citizens in that community. 

Thomas C. Powell w. horn August 25, 1840, and was the son of Martin 
and Jeanette (Churchill) Powell. 'Martin Powell was the youngest of a 
family of eleven children, and was the only one wdio came to the United 
States to seek his fortune. They came from England when he was twelve 
years old and went directly to Baltimore. He later came to Cincinnati, 
Ohio, by raft down the Ohio river and then settled near Lawrence-burg, where 
he purchased land. In 1S55 he came to Warren county and bought two hun- 
dred and forty acres of land and continued farming. He was married in Dear- 
horn county to Jeanette Churchill, and they had seven children, all born in that 
county: William M., Thomas C. and Mary A. are still living. Dan C, Eliza 
J., Alva M. and John are dead. 



580 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COl NT1ES, INDIANA. 

Thomas C. Powell came to Warren counly when he was about lifleen 
years old. He worked there until he was twenty-one with his father, and 
then enlisted. When the call came in 1861 he joined the Thirty Third Indi- 
ana Infantry. Company K, and served three years. He was with Sherman 

liing from "Atlanta to the sea," lighting battles at Wild Cat Mountain, 
Kentucky, Thompson's Station, Tennessee, Resaca, Tennessee, and was in 
the Army of the Cumberland under Col. John Coburn. \flei serving three 
years, he "was discharged at Atlanta. Geori n he returned home, 

went I > farming on his father's land. I lis father owned a great deal ol 
farm land, and Thomas C. Powell did much of the overseeing of the holdi 1 
At one time he was on his father's place in Vermillion county, Illinois, for 
three years. He then bought one hundred and sixty acres of laud in this 
county of his father, and there, he was very successful farming and 
brought his land up to a high state of cultivation. Later he was elected 
sheriff on the Republican ticket, and was active in public affairs of the com- 
munity. He retired to private life after that, and d ired to remain quietly 
at home, but was so well known for his justice and clearheaded judgment that 
he was soon made justice of the peace, and '11 retains that position. 

Mr. Powell was married in 1867 to Margaret Logan, and they had one 
child, Lillian Myrtle, who is the wife of Arthur \Y ; Aims and has a son, 
Marion. In 1893 he was married to Ella Delaney, and they had two children, 
Thomas C, who has lately graduated from high school, and Martin Porter. 

Mr. Powell is very active in the organizations of which he is a member. 
He is identified with Bryant Post, Grand Army the Republic, and is also 
a member of the Grand Army Circle, which is an honorary auxiliary 
to the Woman's Circle. Mr. Powell is also a Mason and belongs to the 
Eastern Star. He is a member of the Baptist church, and he and his wife 
are highly respected in the neighborhood in which they live. 



CHARLES STARNES, SR. 

Only those who come in personal contact with Charles Starnes, Sr., widely 
known apiarist and farmer of Cain township, Fountain county, can understand 
how thoroughly nature and training, habits of thought and action have enabled 
him to accomplish his life work and made him a fit representative of the enter- 
prising class of people to which he belongs. He is a fine type of the sturdy, 
conscientious Hoosier of todaj — a man who unit', a high order of ability 



J en 


;e, doing 




f no man 


1. [84; 


7. He is 


; of ! 


'ennessee 


I'annii 


ig. The 




on tow n - 


; there 


the it st 


Charli 


.•s, John. 



FOUNl \l>: (\ND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 581 

will) courage, patriotism, clean morality and sound comn 
thoroughly and well the work that he finds to do and asking 
for the performance of what he believes to be his simple duly. 

Mr. Starnes was born in Fountain county, [ndiana, June 
a son of Henry and Catherine (Myei I ' I me both nath 
and North Carolina, respectively. The') • ' - ed l :ir lives 1 
subject is the grandson of Thomas Starnes, ivho entei 
ship, Fountain county, in an early day and followed farmii 
of his life. He was the father of eight children, namely: 
Jacob. Thomas, Henry, Margaret, Barbara and Elizabeth. 

Henry Starnes, father of the subject, was educated in the public 
of Fountain county and grew- up on the home farm. He began life for him- 
self by teaching school winters and farming summers, continuing thus for a 
number of years until he got a good starl, then abandoned die school room and 
devoted the rest of his life exclusively to agricultural pursuits. When a 
.young man he married Catherine Myers, dan iter of Daniel and Polly Myers, 
and they became the parents of the following children: Daniel, attorney -at- 
law and at this writing postmaster at Law renceburg, Tennessee: he was a 
soldier in the Union army during the Civil war, being a member of Company 
B, Tenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry: John, the second child, is farming in 
Jackson township, Fountain county; Charles, subject of this sketch; Louis is 
farming in Cain township; Jacob lives in Leavenworth, Kansas; Ellsworth is 
farming in Jackson township, Fountain county: Elizabeth Samantha married 
Joseph Tinsley; Mary maried Luther Delp, deceased; Susan married Thomas 
McGinnis, of Jackson township; Catherine married Cal Delp, a farmer of 
Parke county, Indiana; Joseph W. is deceased; Thomas is deceased; Phraney 
Jane is deceased. 

Henry Starnes, father of the above named children, was a Republican in 
politics and was at one time supervisor. He was a member of the United 
Brethren church. His death occurred at the age of seventy-three years and 
his wife died in 1909, at the advanced age of eighty-three years. 

Charles Starnes, Sr., grew to manhood on the home farm in Jackson 
township and he received his education in the common schools (here. He at 
once took up farming for a livelihood and this has continued to be his life 
work, for the most part, and he is the owner of a well-kept place of eight) 
acres, all under cultivation and well improved. He has made a specialty of 
bee culture for the past thirty years, in collection with general farming, and 
he is widely known as one of the best informed apiarists in the Middle West, 
having made the subject a close study and given much time and thought to its 



582 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

c\ery phase. Tie has been exceptional!.) successful in this line and his advice 
is frequently sought by others and is always heeded with gratifying resul 
Me is at this writing taking care of ahoul one hundred colonies of bees besides 
his own. 

Mr. Starnes was married on March 7, 18(19. to Mai} E. Edwards, daugh- 
ter of Isaac and Polly Edwards, and to this union the following children have 
been born: Carrie M. died when twenty-one years old; Henry I., a sketch 
of whom appears in this work; Lewie E. is a rural mail carrier; Effie E. is 
employed in the Hillsboro postoffice. 

Politically, Mr. Starnes is a Republican, and was honored by the peopb 
by being elected supervisor, the duties of which office he- discharged in a man 
ner that elicited the hearty approval of all concerned. 



THOMAS GLASCOCK. 

The gentleman whose name heads this sketch has long enjoyed prestige 
as a leading citizen o fthe community in which he resides and has been 
an important factor in the affairs of this locality during almost its entire 
history. Reared amid the wild scenes of pioneer life and knowing full well 
wdiat it was to have a home far removed from the ad 'antages of civilization 
in a dense forest, through which the wolves prowled and deer roamed,. Mr. 
Glascock early became inured to hard work and lias always known how to 
appreciate hard toil at its true value, and his career of seventy-four years has 
been a most honorable and commendable one in every respect, lie talks most 
interestingly of conditions which prevailed here during his boyhood when 
the country was new and when people and customs were different. He has 
taken an active part in the growth of the locality along all lines and is one of 
our oldest and most highly esteemed native sons, and his name is eminently 
worthy of perpetuation in these pages. 

Thomas Glascock was born in Fountain county, Indiana, October 10, 
1838, ami is the son of Joseph and Mary (Christe) Glascock. The father 
was born in Fauquier county, Virginia, where the family have long been 
prominent, George Glascock, paternal grandfather of the subject, married 
Frances Jackson, an aunt of the great Confederate general Stonewall Jack- 
son, and a near relative of Claiborne Jackson, one of the early governors of 
Missouri. Grandfather Glascock moved to Kentucky with his family, lo- 
cating at Mills Station, and he had considerable trouble with the Indians, 
who were still hostile when he came to the "dark- and bloody ground country." 



FOUNTAIN AND WARRKN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 583 

Joseph Glascock spent his earlier years in the Blue Grass stale, finally 
coming to Fountain coujity, Indiana, with John Scott, an uncle of the subject 
ami the first white man to settle on what is now known as Scott's Prairie, for 
whom that section was named. It was about 1822 they came here, thus being 
among the very earliest settlers. Joseph Glascock had been reared and mar- 
ried in Kentucky, and he brought his wife and four children with him; they 
were George, William, Francis and Jane, all now deceased; eight other chil- 
dren were born to him after he came to Fountain county, thus making a fam- 
ily of twelve sons and daughters, the others being named, Daniel, Harrison, 
Elizabeth, Mandy and Indiana, all now deceased; Joseph lives al Hillsboro, 
this county; Thomas, of this review, being the eleventh in order of birth; 
and Nancy, who died when young. 

The paternal grandfather, George Glascock, returned to Kentucky, where 
his death occurred, but his wife died in Indi ma. 

Joseph Glascock, father of the subject, settled in Van Buren township, 
entered land from the government which he cleared and improved into a good 
farm and on this he established the permanent home of the family and spent 
the rest of his life there. This land is now owned by W. R. Greenley, of 
Covington. Joseph Glascock was a man of considerable influence in the 
affairs of the community and he was county commissioner for a period of 
eighteen years, filling the office in a manner that won the hearty approval of 
all. He was also secured to settle up forty-seven estates, which he did to the 
credit of himself and to the satisfaction of all concerned. 

Thomas Glascock grew to manhood on the home farm and he received 
his education in the common schools, and early in life he took up farming, 
which he has made his life work, being actively and successfully engaged in 
this vocation until 1905, when he retired and moved to Kingman, where he 
resides at this writing, surrounded by ever)' comfort as a result of his earlier 
years of industry and good management. 

Mr. Glascock was married on December 15, 1859, to Sarah A. Booe, 
daughter of John and Jane (Moffett) Booe, he a native of South Carolina 
and she of Ireland. She was brought to America when six weeks old. the 
voyage in an old-fashioned vessel requiring six week's. From South Carolina 
these parents came to Connersville, Fayette county, Indiana, thence to Foun- 
tain county, locating on Scott's Prairie. Thomas Glascock owns the old 
Booe farm, of one hundred and thirty acres, which James Booe entered from 
the government. 

There were nine children in the family of John Booe and wife, namely: 
Elmira. Flnora Adeline, Jefferson and Alexander Lee are all deceased; 



584 FOUNTAIN AND WAREEN COUNTIES, INDIANA. , 

Savanah lives al Hansford, California; Sarah Ann was the sixth in order 
of birth; Eliza Jane and Arthur arc both de< sed; James R. is a druggisl at 
Cayuga, Indiana. 

Besides the old Booe farm Thomas Glascock also owns valuable and 
well located land in Mill Creek township, all well improved and , , pp 
ductive. Politically, he is a Democrat, and in religious matters belongs to 
the ( hristian Disciples chinch, being an elder in the same. 

Four children were born to Thomas Glascock and wife, namely: Kate, 
who married E. L. Furr, of Veedersburg; Harry IT, who married Jennie C. 
Bodine, is a progressive young man of affairs, with modern ideas and with a 
bright future; he is a breeder of fine horses, keeping a number of excellent 
animals on hand, which are greatly admired by all who see them, and he is 
doing a thriving business, and is popular throughout the community, being a 
man of industry, good habit; and obliging nature. A sketch of his wife's 
people will be found in that of James Bodine, appearing on another page of 
this work. Two children have been born to Harry H. Glascock and wife, 
Mary Catherine and Thomas Zekiel, 

The third child burn to Thomas Glascock and wife was Viola, who 
married V. E, Baker, a printer of Cincinnati, Ohio; Edna Glascock, the 
youngest child, mai ried Benjamin Rowdctt, who is in tbe United States mail 
service, making his home at Kingman, this county. Two of the subject's 
children died in infancy. 

The Glascock family is one of the best known and most highly respected 
of the county. 



WILLIAM TAYLOR WILLETT. 

While success cannot be achieved without unflagging industry, the futil- 
ity of effort is often noticeable and results from the fact that it is not com- 
bined with sound judgment. Many a man who gives his entire life to toil, 
earnest and unremitting, never acquires a competence, but when his labor is 
well directed, prosperity always follows. Mr. Willett is one whose work has 
been supplemented by careful management, and today he is one of those who 
have triumphed over adverse conditions and won success, being now num- 
bered among the representative farmers of Shawnee township. 

William T. Willett is a native son of Indiana, having been born at Cory- 
don on the 1 2th of September, 1872. His parents are John Boone and Alary 
(Zenor) Willett, the latter being a sister of ex-Congressman Zenor, of this 




WILLIAM T. WILLETT. 



FOUNTAIN AND \\ \Kki.x COUNTIES, INDIANA, 585 

slate. On both the paternal and mater ial line--, the subject is descended from 
sterling pioneer stock, the Booncs having been related to Daniel Boone, the 
noted frontiersman, while members of the Zenor Family assisted m the con- 
struction of the State constitution of Indiana. 

John Boone Willett received his early education in the common schools 
oi Harrison county and followed ining all In- life. About fifteen yeai ag 
he came to Warren county, where he now lives, and is extensively engaged in 
fanning. A Democrat in politics, he took an active part in local campaigns 
and through two elections he rendered effective service as chairman of the 
county central committee. To him and his wife were born six children, namely: 
William T., the subject of this sketch; Richard Phillip, who died at the ..■ 
of twenty-two years; George L. and James are farmers in Warren count)'; 
Sallie is the wife of William Head, a successful farmer in Warren count) ; 
Harriet is the wife of Oscar Pauley, a business man at Jasonville. The latter 
is a well known Democrat and has served as trustee of his township and 111 
other minor offices. He is a member of the Knights of the Maccabees. 

sketch was educated in the public schools of Harri- 
v (d eighteen years he came to Warren county, In- 
was employed by his uncle on the Waiter Q; Gres- 
n farming I ; himself on the Miller farm, in Jordan 
u a small scale and increasing gradually until at 
ei seven hundred acres of land at a time. In March, 
tu Fountain county and located in Shawnee town- 
's and operates a farm of two hundred and twenty- 
live acres, besides which he owns one hundred and fifty-seven acres in Wan 
Buren township. He is thoroughly up-to-date in his methods and the general 
appearance of his place indicates that he possesses judgment and discrimina- 
tion of a high order. The place is well improved and is very productive. In 
addition to the raising of a general line of cereals, Mr. Willett gives some 
attention to the raising of live stock, which he has found a profitable source 
of income. 

On January 15, 1897, Mr. Willett was married to Emily Shade, the 
daughter of Lafayette Shade, of Hillsboro, and they have become the parents 
of four children, namely: Clive, Clifford, Ivan and Dorothy. 

Politically, Mr. Willett is a stanch Democrat and gives a loyal support to 
his party. Fraternally, he is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, 
having been venerable consul and the present banker of his camp. He is also 
a member of the Lafayette Lodge No. 143, Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, and president of the American Horsethief Detective Association, and 



The sul 


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son county, 


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ham farm. 


He then bega 


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length he w; 


is farming ov 


laoO, Mr. \ 


A'illett came 


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he now vesidi 



5S6 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

a member of the Improved Order of Red Men. lit- is a man of fine personal 
qualities ami genial disposition, though entirely unassuming, ami his friends 
are in number a- his acquaintances, lie has ever stood for the highest inter- 
ests of the communities in which lie has lived ami is always found on the right 
side of every moral question, his excellent record having gained for him the 
respect of all. 



HERMAN NEHRIG 



It is doubtful if any people that go to make up our cosmopolitan popula- 
tion have better habits of life than those who came originally from the great 
German empire, and their descendants. These descendants are distinguished 
for their thrift and honesty, and these two qualities in the inhabitants of any 
country will eventually make that country great among the nations of the 
earth. When with these two qualities arc coupled the other attributes of com- 
mon sense and correct habits, as most all German descendants em to possess, 
there are afforded such qualities as will enrich any laud and place it in the 
front rank of the nations of the earth in the scale of elevated humanity. Of 
this excellent people came the Nehrig family, one of the best known of War- 
ren county, and of whom Herman Nehrig, the well-known blacksmith and 
hardware merchant of Williamsport, is a worthy representative. He has been 
a diligent worker in his chosen Geld of endeavor .and has been rewarded with 
gratifying success, and, having minded well his own affairs and kept the even 
tenor of his way through the years, he has earned the good will and esteem 
of his neighbors and acquaintances. 

Herman Nehrig was born on June 4, 1870, in Lafayette, Indiana, and is 
the son of Eli and Christina (Smith) Nehrig. Eli Nehrig was born in Ger- 
many, where he received his education and was reared to the age of eighteen 
years. At the age mentioned he came to the United States, having a desire 
to better his condition and having heard much of the splendid opportunities 
afforded in this country. A brother living in Lafayette, Indiana, induced him 
to locate there, where for a time he was employed as a butcher. Subsequently, 
under the tutelage of his uncle, he became a tailor and worked at that trade- 
up to the time of his death. He was the father of fourteen children, five of 
whom are dead, the subject of this sketch being the fourth in order of birth. 
Most of the surviving members of this family now live in Lafayette. 

Herman Nehrig secured a good education in the schools -of Lafayette 
and remained there until in August, 1894, when he came to Williamsport and 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 5S7 

started out on his own account, lie started in business cm a small scale and 
by carefully watching all details and husbanding his resources he soon found 
himself in a healthy financial condition. I lis business habits had won for him 
a good credit, one of (he biggest assets a young man can possess, and this he 
has never abused. He had learned the trade of a blacksmith while living in 
Lafayette and here he opened a shop, where he was soon in command of his 
full share of the public patronage. He i- an expert horseshoer and also carries 
a good hardware stock, in all of which lines he is successful, lie has been 
rewarded with prosperity and besides his business in town, he owns forty- 
three acres of splendid farm land, which has been a source of considerable 
income. 

On September 18, 1895. Mr. Nehrig was married to Ina Prather, the 
daughter of Jerry and Anna (^Slifer) Prather, the father having been a suc- 
cessful farmer in this county. To Mr. and Mrs. Nehrig have been born four 
children, Loris, Arol, Keith and Mary M. 

Fraternally, Air. Nehrig is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons 
and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, while religiously, the family are 
identified with the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Nehrig's popularity is 
well deserved, as in him are embraced the characteristics of an unbending in- 
tegrity, unabating energy and industry that never flags. 



SAMUEL J. PURNELL. 

There is a great difference between the business ideas of a half century 
ago and those of the present time. In former times there was little or no 
co-operation among business men. Partnerships were small and the business 
was confined to lines wholly different from those of this day. Among the 
business men of Fountain count}- who have shown themselves capable of con- 
ducting alone an important enterprise under modern methods is Samuel J. 
Purnell, proprietor of a popular general store at Veedersburg, and a man of 
progressive ideas in all things. 

Mr. Purnell was born in Vermillion county, Illinois, in 1858. He is the 
son of Henry A. and Nancy E. Justice. The father was born while his par- 
ents were on the road from Kentucky to their new home in the Middle West, 
while they were encamped a week, as they were making the overland trip in 
wagon- in the. early days. The mother was also from Kentucky. They 
settled three miles south of Hillsboro, and were pioneers in Fountain 



588 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

country. The paternal -rand father of the subject also came through in a 
wagon from Kentucky to this country. His family consisted of twelve chil- 
dren, of whom Henry A., father of the subject, was the ninth in order of 
birth. For a completer sketch of the earlier members of this well known old 
family the reader is directed to the -ketch of Dr. Puruell, in this work. 
Henry A. Purnell, mentioned above, grew to manhood in this community 
and he received his education in the common schools of those early times, 
then took up farming, which he made his life work, following this vocation 
successfully until his death. The Justice family removed from Kentucky to 
Parke county. Indiana, in an early da> . also and there the maternal grand- 
parents of the subjec spent the balance of their lives. 

Samuel Purnell grew- up on the home farm and received his education 
in the public schools. He devoted his earlier life to farming, then moved to 
Ladoga, where he again attended school, also went to school at YV'aveland, 
this state, after which he turned his attention to merchandising, which busi- 
ness he has continued with ever-increasing success to the present time. He 
is now the owner of a very well known store in Veedersburg, where he car- 
ries a large and carefully selected stock of general merchandi-.-. bis cus- 
tomers coining from a wide district, and here they always find co rteous and 
kind treatment and reasonable prices. 

Mr. Purnell was married in 1880 to Odessa burr, daughter of Samson 
and Frances (Flesler) Furr, who came from Kentucky in an early day and 
here became very comfortably established. Jacob Furr, father of Samson 
Furr, was for a number of years justice of the peace, who, in pioneer times, 
went to Kentucky with an ox team, and hauled Samuel Purnell, grandfather 
of the subject, and his family to Fountain county, Indiana. Five children 
were born to Samson and Frances Furr, two of whom are living at this writ- 
ing, namely: Odessa, wife of Mr. Purnell, and Mrs. I. N. Kerr, of Veeders- 
burg. 

Charles Furr, who was a member of the Purdue football team and one 
of the best players that university ever turned out, was killed in an accident 
in Indianapolis in 1904. 

Three children have been born to Samuel J. Purnell and wife, namely: 
Fred S., who married Flizabetb Shoaf, and they live in Attica; lie was 
graduated from the State University of Indiana in 1900 and he has chosen 
the law as his profession, being very successful in this field. He is consid- 
ered one of the best speakers in western Indiana. He has been called back to 
the university to address the law students on several different occasions. Myrtle 
and Helen Purnell arc assisting their father in the store and living at home. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 589 

Mr. Purnell is a member u\ the Christian Disciple church, and frater- 
nally he belongs to Knights of Pythias Lodge Ko. 240, at Veedersburg. rle 
has been township trustee of his township and was also township assessor 
for two terms, tilling these offices in a manner that reflected much credit upon 
himself and to the entire satisfaction of the people.' Politically, he is loyal 
to the Republican part)'. 



WILLIAM M. NUSS. 

The subject of this review is one of the representative farmers and stock 
men of the eastern part of Fountain county, and by his own indomitable 
efforts has acquired a valuable farm and desirable residence properties in and 
around the village of Newtown, Richland township. He has always beer 
known as an alert, progressive and broad-minded man, who, in his labors, 
has never permitted himself to follow in the rut in a blind, apathetic way, but 
has studied and experimented and thus secured the maximum returns from his 
efforts while he has so ordered his course at all times as to command the con- 
fidence and regard of the people of the community in which he lives, being a 
man of honorable business methods and advocating whatever tends to pro- 
mote the public welfare in any way. 

William M. Nuss was born in Pennsylvania, January 21, 1852. He is 
the son of Franklin and Susan (Dimmick) Nuss, both natives of Pennsyl- 
vania, where they grew to maturity, were educated and married, and there 
spent their earlier years. They came to Fountain count}', Indiana, in 1858, 
when their son, William M., of this review, was six years old, locating in 
Newtown. There they resided two years, then moved to a farm in Richland 
township, where they established the family home and there the elder Nuss 
died in September, 1880. His widow survived thirty-two years, and is now, 
advanced in age, making her home with her daughter on the old farmstead. 

Eight children were born to Franklin Nuss and wife, named as follows : 
William M., of this sketch, who is the oldest; Andrew H. died in 1890; Lewis 
F. died in 1912; James lives in California; Loyd and Rufus both died youi g; 
Walter lives near Marion, Indiana ; Clara married Alex Bell and they live 
on the old home place. 

• Franklin Nuss was a Democrat, but he never sought or held public office, 
being a cpiiet, home man. He was for a few years a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, and religiously belonged to the Presbyterian 
church. 



59° FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

William M. Nuss grew to manhood on the home farm and he received 
a good education in the common schools of this county. In March., 1S80, he 
was united in marriage with Rista Duncan, daughter of Edward and Lucinda 
(Hauts) Duncan. Her father was a native of Indiana and was among the 
early residents of Fountain county where he engaged in farming most of his 
life, finally moving to Newtown, dying there a year later, August 17, 1895. 
His family consisted of seven children, named as follows: Rista, wife of 
Mr. Nuss, of this sketch; Louisa is deceased; the third and fourth children 
died in infancy; Joseph L. is also deceased; Drusilla married Dawson Beadle, 
and they live on a farm in Logan township; Melvin died when young. 

The union of Mr. and Mrs. Nuss has been without issue. 

Mr. Nuss has been very successful in his life work and he is the owner 
of a well improved and productive farm of one hundred and nine acres in 
Richland township, and also three valuable lots in Newtown. He has kept 
his place well improved and on it stand a pleasant, well-furnished home, a 
good barn and other substantial outbuildings, including a cement hog-house, 
cement corn-crib and his lawn is covered with shrubbery and shade trees, 
through which lead cement walks. He has six large sugar trees and a young 
grove of poplars. Near his place is forty acres of good land which his mother 
owns. Mr. Nuss is living in Newtown, where he moved in January, 191 1. 
Fraternally, he is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and he is broad in 
his religious views, attending all the churches. 



JAMES W. GOOKINS. 

One of the influential citizens of Veedersburg is the gentleman to whose 
career the reader's attention is now directed who was for years ranked with 
Fountain county's leading merchants and who is now engaged in the real 
estate business. A man of excellent endowments and upright character, Mr. 
Gookins has been a valued factor in local arrairs and has ever commanded 
unequivocal confidence and esteem, being loyal to the upbuilding of his com- 
munity and ever vigilant in his efforts to further the interests of the same 
along material, civic and moral lines. 

James W. Gookins was born in Perryville, Vermillion county, Indiana, 
May 30, 1845, and is the son of Milo and Mary (Barnes) Gookins, natives 
of Vermont and Ohio, respectively. Grandfather Barnes lived in Vigo 
county, ten miles from Terre Haute, on Otter Creek prairie. He had come 



FOUNTAIN AND WARKEN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 59I 

from Ohio to Vigo county in a very early day. Milo Gookins, who was 
twenty-one years old when lie left his old Vermont home, also located in 
Vigo county, Indiana, and there lie and Mary Barnes were married, and later 
moved to the town i Clinton. Vermillion con ly, thence to Perryville. He 
was an early fiatboai merchant, taking produce to New Orleans and bring- 
ing hack groceries and general supplies. He continued in the mercantile 
business until 1852, then mined to Mansfield, Parke county, and engaged in 
lumbering and milling, also the dry goods business, and carried on these 
lines lor a period of seven years, buying and selling on a year's time. In 
1859 he moved to Mill Creek township. Fountain county, where he followed 
farming until 1S63, when he was appointed Indian agent at Fort Gib 11 and 
Fort Scott and he discharged the duties of that important position for a period 
of three years. Fie was appointed under President Lincoln. He then re- 
turned to the farm, where he remained until his death, in tS/O. lie was a 
prominent man in this section of the state, and was especially influential as 
a temperance worker and an advocate for good schools. His family con- 
sisted of nine children, namely : Matilda married James Martin, of Attica ; 
Elizabeth died when twenty-three years of age ; Julia married James A. 
Clearwater, who was a -minister in the Methodist church for a period of fifty- 
two years, being now retired and living at Brazil, Indiana ; Reuhama mar- 
ried Capt. Oliver Coffin, of Parke county, a Union soldier who died at the 
age of twenty-three years ; Suowden B., who lives at Veedersburg, is a car- 
penter by trade, and was in the army three years; James W., of this sketch, 
was the next in order of birth; Frank B. is a merchant at Sterling; Edward 
married and farmed for a time in Fountain county, later was employed in an 
engine works in Indianapolis, and his death occurred in December, 1905. 

James W. Gookins was reared on the home farm and he received his 
education in the common schools, and in the Presbyterian Academy at Wave- 
land, Indiana. The subject was married in February, 1875, to Celina A. Dice, 
daughter of Henry and Charlotte (Rice) Dice. The Rice family made their 
home for some time where Henry Dice lived in this county. After leaving 
school, Mr. Gookins worked two years as "printer's devil," then farmed a 
while, later clerked for Lucas Brothers at Steam Corners and Hillsboro, re- 
maining with them for a period of three years, giving eminent satisfaction 
in every respect. Fie then came to Veedersburg in 1874, where he opened a 
store, which he operated with much success for a period of thirty years, en- 
joying a large and lucrative trade with the people of the surrounding coun- 
try, and, by his able management and fair treatment of his thousands of 
customers, he laid by a handsome competency, and retired from the business 



592 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

in 1904. Since then he has engaged in the real estate business. He is de- 
serving of a great deal of credit for what he has accomplished, having relied 
solely upon himself. Politically, he is a Republican, and religiously is a 
Presbyterian. 

Mr. Gookins was twice married, his last wife being Josephine Madingan, 
daughter of James Madingan, who was a native of [reland, who came to this 
country after his marriage and when he had earned enough money he sent 
for his wife, who was the next youngest of a family of eight children. He 
came to America with nothing, but by perseverance he became well estab- 
lished in due time. 

Two children constitute Mr. Gookins' family, Ralph D., who married 
Maud McNeil, lives in Veedersburg; they have three children, Rutha, Clara 
and Josephine, all at home; Ruth M. married Orlan A. Cassady, a traveling- 
salesman of Spencer, Indiana; they have four children, Ralph, Margaret, 
James and Louise, all at home. 



ELA* ER T. STRADER. 

Elmer T. Strader, farmer and a member of an old and esteemed family 
of Fountain county, was born November 29, 1861, in Richland township, and 
is a son of Daniel and Frances Matilda (Leath) Strader, both parents early 
settlers and among the respected people of the community in which ey lived. 
Elmer T. Strader's early experience on his father's farm was conducive to 
good health, vigorous physical development and a determination while still 
young to make the most of his opportunities; accordingly he formulated plans 
for the future and with high ideals and noble purposes, resolved that his life, 
should be a credit to himself, an honor to his family and of use to his fellow 
men. During the years of his minority he attended the public school in the 
vicinity of the homestead and on attaining his majority engaged in the pur- 
suit of agriculture, which honored calling he has since followed with encour- 
aging success, owning for some years past a fine farm of one hundred and 
forty-three acres in Shawnee township, which he has brought to a high state 
of cultivation and improved with substantial modern buildings, good fences, 
etc., until he now has a house, modern in equipment, comfortable and con- 
venient in its appointments, and uniting all the requirements which a first-class 
American home is intended to subserve. The reigning spirit in this place of 
abode is the esteemed lady whom he married on the 8th day of July, 1903, 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 593 

and who previous to that time was Miss Lora B. Barker, daughter of Thomas 
and Emma Barker. Mrs. Strader has co-operated with her husband in the 
promotion of their mutual interests and welfare, nobly seconds him in all of his 
endeavors, and it is not too much to say that not a little of his success in life 
is due to her judicious efforts and wise counsel. They have one child, a 
daughter, who answers to the name of "Helen Louise, and whose birth oc- 
curred on March 13, 1906. 

Mr. Strader and wife are respected members of the Union Christian 
church and endeavor to make their daily lives correspond to the religion which 
they profess. .He takes an active interest in the material advancement of the 
community, stands for law and order and his influence has always been on 
the right side of every moral question and issue. For some years he has been 
a member of the local Horsethief Detective Association, an organization com- 
posed of the best men of the township, whose efforts have been untiring in 
ridding the county of the lawless element which formerly infested this part 
of the state to the great annoyance of the farmers and to the serious loss of not 
a few. 

Thomas Barker, father of Mrs. Strader, was raised in Parke county, In- 
diana, and was a well-to-do farmer and respected citizen. He married while 
living there Emma Morgan, who bore him six children, including Lora B., 
wife of the subject, whose birth occurred in Iroquois county, Illinois, March 
17, 1871, but who was reared and educated in Parke county, Indiana. 



JOSEPH A. BORDERS. 

The record of Mr. Borders is that of a man who by his own unaided 
efforts worked his way from a modest beginning to a position of affluence 
and influence in the business world. His life has been of unceasing industry 
and perseverance and the systematic and honorable methods which he has fol- 
lowed have won him the unbounded confidence of his fellow citizens of War- 
ren county. 

Joseph A. Borders was born near Lafayette, Tippecanoe county, In- 
diana, on October 14, 1848, and is the son of Solomon and Margaret (Alex- 
ander) Borders. At the age of eleven years he was brought to Warren 
county and has lived here continuously since. His father was a farmer and 
his first years were therefore spent amid the scenes and as a participant in 
the labors of the farm. He received a common school education and upon 

(38) 



594 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

starting in life on his own account, having spent his time on the farm until 
iS<j_\ he began building gravel roads as a contractor. At that time mud roads 
were the universal rule and he has been a witness of the wonderful transfor- 
mation to the pre em magnificent system of highways in this section of the 
stale. lie hauled the second and third loads of gravel which were used in the 
construction of the State road through Warren county, lie followed road 
buikliug for about four years and I'hen took county bridge building and con- 
crete work, to which he has since devoted his entire attention. His work al- 
ways stands the test and he 'is therefore considered a thoroughly reliable and 
competent contractor. He lias handled some of the largest contracts in his 
line, in the county and enjoys an excellent reputation among business men 
with whom he has had dealings. 

On October 28. 1874. Mr. Borders was married to Silvia Alice Scott, 
who was born near Boswell. Warren county, Indiana, on August 24, 1853, 
the daughter of David and Alice (.Hanks) Scott. Mrs. Borders' grandfather 
and Abraham Lincoln's mother, Nancy Hanks, were cousins. Mrs. Scott died 
when her daughter, Mrs. Border--, was but nine months' old and she was bul 
two years old when her father died. She was then taken and reared by an 
aunt. She received a common schoul education, h ving attended the same 
school as Mr. Borders, where they became sweethearts. 

Politically, Mr. Borders has always given his support o the Republican 
party, but has never been an office seeker. Fraternally, he is affiliated with 
the Knights of Pythias and, with his wife, belongs to the Pythian Sisters. 
Mr. and Mrs. Borders are members of the Methodist church, she having 
served as president of the Ladies'- Aid Society for ten years. They are both 
popular in the circles in which they move and their home is the frequent meet- 
ing place of their many friends. 



HENRY I. AND LOUIS STARNES. 

Two of the progressive and up-to-date farmers of Fountain count)', who 
have succeeded at their chosen calling because they have been persistent and 
good managers, are Henry I. and Louis Starnes, the former the present popu- 
lar and efficient postmaster at the village of Hillsboro, and the latter the owner 
of a large, well improved farm in Cain township. They are men who have 
proven of vast worth to the community in general, for their lives have been 
above reproach, the)' having ever been known as enterprising, neighborly, 



FOUNTAIN AND WAKKKX COUNTIES, INDIANA. 595 

public-spirited and honest, and here they have been contented to spend their 
lives, keeping untarnished the excellent reputation of the family, which settled 
in this community when it was new and partly developed, and when the help 
of just such stmng minded, brawny armed people were much needed and ap- 
preciated. So these gentlemen are eminently entitled to special mention in a 
volume of this kind. 

Henry 1. Starnes was born near Hilisboro, Indiana, February 13, 187J, 
and there he grew to maturity and received his education in the common schools 
of Cain township. He began life as a newspaper man, working for some time 
on the Veedersburg Reporter. Gaining there a definite and practical knowl- 
edge of the newspaper business, he came to Hilisboro in 1889. when only 
eighteen years of age, and operated successfully the Hilisboro Clipper in 1890, 
then operated with equal satisfactory results the IVingate Graphic ami the 
Waynefown Despatch, in 1892. He then worked on various papers, and in 
189S established the Hilisboro Times, which he operated two years, lie took 
the census of 1900 in this locality, and he was appointed postmaster at Hilis- 
boro, December 19, 1901, and he has been incumbent of the office continuously 
to the present time, discharging his duties in a manner that has reflected much 
credit upon himself and to the entire satisfaction of the department and the 
people. He is the owner of fifty acres of good laud in tain township. 

The marriage of Henry I. Starnes occurred on A.igust 25, 1S92, to Flora 
Temple, and to this union three children have been born, namely: Harry T., 
Charles F. and Ethel M. Politically, he is a Republican and has always been 
loyal in his support of his party's principles. 

Louis Starnes was born in Fountain county, May r 5. 1849. Here he grew 
to manhood and was educated in the common schools and in Waveland Acad- 
emy. He began life for himself by teaching school, which he continued suc- 
cessfully for a period of five years. He sold sewing machines for a year and 
a half, and since then he has followed farming, and is now the owner of a 
highly improved and productive farm of two hundred and twenty-eight acres 
in Cain township, on which he has a good set of buildings, and keeps some 
good grades of live stock at all seasons. 

Louis Starnes was married on March 27, 1873, to Emily Edwards, daugh- 
ter of Isaac and Mary (Vessel) Edwards, and to this union five children have 
been born, namely: Mary C, who married Austin Kealing. of Hilisboro; 
Aura E. married C. R. Trowbridge, of Mishawaka ; Lucretia G. married 
Charles Kealing; Otis J. is deceased ; Charles B. lives in Hilisboro. 

Politically, Louis Starnes is a loyal Republican, and religiously he is a 
member and a trustee of the United Brethren church. 



596 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

RUSSELL WARRICK. 

One of our well known citizens and progressive men of affairs is Russell 
Warrick, of Veedersburg, a worthy representative of sterling pioneers of 
Fountain county, his maternal grandfather being one of the first two men in 
this locality, braving the wilds of the famous Wabash valley as early as the 
year 1822, when his neighbors were wild animals and Indians. He selected 
the site of his future home and built a log cabin in the primeval forests. It 
was typical of the times, built of round logs, with a huge fireplace in one end, 
with puncheon floors, clapboard roof and bark siding, and soon it was sur- 
rounded by a small clearing. Subsequently the progenitor of the Warricks 
started life here. With these rude beginnings in this county the Spinning 
and Warrick families, with wild and primitive surroundings, became Hoosiers 
in the correct meaning of the term, and they have played well their parts in 
the subsequent development of the locality. 

Russell Warrick was born in Fountain county, Indiana, September 14, 
1845. He is the son of Jesse and Mary (Spinning) Warrick, both natives of 
Ohio where they spent their earlier years, the mother having come here with 
her parents in 1822. Her father, Isaac Spinning, referred to in the preceding 
paragraph, came here from the Buckeye state on horseback, stopping on the 
way at the present site of Indianapolis, and there helped raise the first log 
cabin, the country roundabout being a wilderness. He came on to Fountain 
county and entered land from the government, paying the usual fee of one 
dollar and twenty-five cents per acre. He thought he was the first man in 
the county, but soon discovered that Samuel Stephens had preceded him by 
one day. 

Jesse Warrick, father of the subject of this sketch, came here in a very 
early day from Warren county, Ohio, and here became well established as a 
general farmer. His family consisted of twelve children, all now deceased 
hut four, who were named: George, who is living at Wingate, Indiana; 
Russell of this review; Newton and Benjamin (twins), the former living at 
Veedersburg and the latter at Stone Bluff, this county. 

Russell Warrick grew to manhood in this county and received fairly good 
educational advantages in the local schools, and here he has been content to 
spend his life. 

On February 24, 1866, Mr. Warrick was united in marriage with 
Johanna Boord, daughter of Jonathan and Miriam Boord, early settlers of 
this county, and a highly respected family- Johanna Boord lived in Cincin- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 5Q7 

nati when it was but a small village. Two children were burn to Russell 
Warrick and wile, namely: Orrin F., who lives in Van B.uren township, 
this county, and Lena, who died when two and one-half years old. 

The subject has been twice married, his second wife, whom he joined 
in matrimony in 190O, being- Alary L. Wilson. 

Mr. Warrick is an honored veteran of the Civil war, having enlisted on 
March 13, 18O5, in Company C, One Hundred and Fifty- fourth Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry, and he saw service with the army in Virginia and was 
honorably discharged at Winchester, that state, on August 14, 1865. He is a 
member of the Grand Army of the Republic and also is a member of the 
Christian church. He has been very sucessful in a business way and has a 
good home and a competency. He has become one of the expert agriculturists 
of this section of the state, and he has for about ten years furnished reports 
on crop conditions from Van Buren township to the government. 



WILLIAM McGILVREY. 

The gentleman whose name initiates this article is a native of Ohio, a 
state which has been the cradle of much of our western civilization and upon 
which the commonwealth of Indiana has largely drawn for its most enlight- 
ened, enterprising and progressive citizenship. Most of the life of William 
McGilvrey has been spent in the Hoosier state, for he was a mere child when 
brought to the Wabash country by his parents, and here he has continued to 
reside, having made general farming his life work. In this he has met with 
encouraging success, and is now enabled to spend his declining years in hon- 
orable retirement, in his pleasant home in the village of Kingman, in the 
extreme southern part of the county, his farm lying just over the line in 
Parke county. 

Mr. McGilvrey was born March 8, 1833, in Butler county, Ohio, and is 
the son of Samuel and Charlotte (Clapp) McGilvrey. The father was born 
in Ohio and there spent his early life and married there. In 1835 ne brought 
his family to Mill Creek township, Fountain county, and entered land from 
the government, which he cleared and developed into a farm on which he 
made a very comfortable living, remaining there actively engaged until old 
age came on and he retired, moving to Covington, where his death occurred. 
His wife subsequently went to Kansas, where her death occurred. Their 
family consisted of four children, namely: John, who is living in Iowa; Will- 
iam, subject of this sketch; Alexander and Mary Catherine are deceased. 



598 FOUNTAIN AND WARK N COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

William McGilvrey was two years old when he accompanied his par- 
ents to Fountain county, and here lie grew to manhood on the home farm, 
where he worked hard when a hoy, and he received such education as the old- 
time schools afforded in Parke county, and iu that county he turned his at- 
tention to general farming which he made his life work, and he became very 
comfortably fixed, following this vocation until October 30, 1907, when he 
moved to the village of Kingman, but he still owns his well improved and 
valuable farm of ninety-seven acres, three miles southwest of Kingman in 
Parke county. He went to Iowa early in his career and there spent eight 
years engaged in farming. 

Mr. McGilvrey was married on November 11, 1855, to Harriet A. \\ at- 
son, daughter of Alexander and Mary (Iusminger) Watson, who came from 
Kentucky to Parke county, Indiana, in an early day and here established the 
family home. 

Three children have been born to the subject and wife, named as fol- 
lows: Mary Elizabeth, who married Edward M. Gookins, is deceased; 
Frances Jane married James Bonebrake, and they live in Kingman; Amanda 
Emaline married Ira Bonebrake, who died when forty-one years old, leaving 
two children. 

Politically, Mr. McGilvrey is a Republican, but he has never been es- 
pecially active in public affairs or held office. 



WILLIAM H. CATES. 

That the plenitude of satiety is seldom attained in the affairs of life is 
to be conquered a most beneficial deprivation, for where ambition is satistied 
and eve.y ultimate end realized, if such be possible, apathy must follow. 
Effort \.ould cease, accomplishment be prostrate and creative talent waste 
its energies in inactivity. The men Who have pushed forward the wheels of 
progiess have been those to whom satisfaction lies ever in the future, who 
have .abored continuously, always finding in each transition stage an incen- 
tive for further effort. William Ii. Cates, of Kingman, is one whose well 
directed atfo.rts have gained for him a position of desired prominence in the 
business, civic and social life of Fountain county, and his energy and enter- 
prise ha\ ^ been crowned by success. Fie is a man who, while laboring for 
his' o. i) idvancemcnt, has never neglected his duties as a citizen, and Ins 
nam gd down in the history of his county as one of its benefactors and 

a 11 did much for its upbuilding and general progress. 



FOUNTAIN AND WAUKEN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 599 

Mr. Gates was born in Fountain count)', Indiana, August 25, 1S51, and 
is the sun of David, Sr., and Jane (Lindley) Cates. The father was liorn in 
Virginia, where his earlier days were spent; later he moved to the foot of 
the Cumberland mountains in Tennessee, for eight years, thence to Orange 
county, Indiana, and finally, in 1844, he located permanently in Fountain 
county, at the place called Cates, he being its founder, and which is at pres- 
ent a thriving village. He became a prominent man in this locality and his 
efforts resulted in large financial success. When the railroad was built 
through the county he and Aaron Lindley offered to help build a station and 
a grade on their land if the railroad company would put a station there; they 
did so and named it Cates after the subject's father, as stated. 

David Cates, Sr., had two children by his first wife, William H., of this 
review, and Elizabeth, who died when eight years of age. The elder Cates 
later married Catherine P. Lindley, of Parke county, and to this union two 
children were born, Joseph T., deceased, and Mary J., who married a Mr. 
Campbell. 

, When David Cates, Sr., came here he purchased land of David Shirk, 
which he cleared and developed into a good farm and there he continued to 
spend the remainder of his days, his death occurring on January 12, 1900. 
His first wife, the mother of the subject, died in 1859 at the old home. 

William H. Cates, of this sketch, grew to manhood on the home farm 
and there he assisted with the general work and received a good common 
school education in his neighborhood and at the Valparaiso University, grad- 
uating in 1875. In the year 1879 he was united in marriage with Harriet E. 
Lindley, daughter of Nathan and Susan (Harvey) Lindley, who came to this 
county from Ohio, the father having been a native of North Carolina, from 
which state he came overland to Ohio in a wagon in the early days, thence 
to Parke county, Indiana, when this country was sparsely settled. 

The subject of this sketch began life by teaching school, which he fol- 
lowed two years, then took charge of the railroad office at Cates, later was 
postmaster there, then he engaged in the lumber and grain business for a 
period of five years at Cayuga with much success, after which he returned to 
the old home place, where he continued to reside until 1906, when he moved 
to Kingman, where he has since lived retired. He had been very successful 
as a general farmer and stock man, keeping the old farm well improved and 
well cultivated and became one of the leading farmers of the township. He 
has laid by a handsome competency and is the owner of valuable city prop- 
erty in Kingman. He has made what he has unaided and by his persistency 
and good management. 



600 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Gates, named as follows: 
Maud J. died when eight months old; Minnie died at the age of twenty 
years; Annie died when eight years old; and the death of Lizzie M. occurred 
at the age of fourteen months. 

Mr. Cates, like his worthy father before him, has always been a man of 
public spirit. He donated the right of way for the railroad when it was 
built through his locality. He also helped with the work of building' the 
station and making the grading and sidings, all of which made a considerable 
donation for one man. He is a Prohibitionist, and while he has taken more 
or less interest in public affairs he has never sought or held public office. He 
is a member of the Friends church, and a man of clean personal and social life. 



HOMER G. WATERMAN. 

The office of biography is not to give voice to a man's modest esti- 
mate of himself and his accomplishments, but rather to leave upon the record 
the verdict establishing his character by the consensus of opinion on the part 
of his neighbors and fellow citizens. The life of Homer G. Waterman, one of 
the successful farmers of Richland township, Fountain county, has been such 
as to elicit just praise from those who know him best, having spent his life in 
his native county engaged in the pursuits for which nature and training have 
best suited him and is a creditable representative of one of our much respected 
old families. 

Homer G. Waterman was born in Troy township, Fountain county, In- 
diana, on the 17th of January, 1862, and is a son of Hiram and Lina (Spence) 
Waterman, the father a native of New York state and the mother of Foun- 
tain county, Indiana. Hiram Waterman came to Indiana in an early day, 
settling in Covington and engaged in teaching school, also teaching at Roch- 
ester, Illinois. He then took up general work and is still living at Covington. 
The subject's mother is also living. They were the parents of three children, 
namely: Homer G., the immediate subject of this sketch; Elizabeth, the wife 
of Peter Ost; Walter, who is a printer at Danville, Illinois. 

The subject of this sketch secured a good, practical education in the 
public schools and has devoted all his active years to agricultural pursuits. 
He is now operating ninety-five acres of the old Reister farm, the original 
deed for which, signed by President John Quincy Adams, he has in his pos- 
session. This is one of the fine old farms of this county and here Mr. Water- 




MR. AND MRS. H. G. WATERMAN. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 6oi 

man carried on general farming, in which he has met with a large measure of 
success, owing to his practical methods and persistent industry. He keeps the 
farm in splendid condition and raises all the crops common to this locality, 
also giving due attention to the raising of live stock, giving intelligent direc- 
tion to all of his work and business affairs. 

In December, 1S91, Mr. Waterman was united in marriage to Barbara 
Ellen Riester, the daughter of Selestin and Christina Riester. Her parents 
were natives of Germany, from which country they emigrated to the United 
States, settling in Cincinnati, where their marriage occurred. They then came 
to Fountain county. Indiana, settling near Attica. Subsequently they located 
southwest of Mellott, where they have lived for the long period of fifty-three 
years. They are still living, at the age of eighty-five years. They became the 
parents of seven children, namely: Joseph, of Richland township, this 
county; Julia, deceased; Barbara Ellen, wife of the subject; Alice, who lives 
in Richland township; Hattie, of Mellott; John, of Indianapolis; Emma, 
who is employed in the office of the Indianapolis News. Mr. and Mrs. Water- 
man are the parents of one child, Arthur, who is at home. 

Politically, Mr. Waterman gives his support to the Republican party, 
but his business affairs preclude his seeking public office. Religiously, he is a 
member of the Christian (New Light) church, to which he gives a liberal 
support. He is a member of the Horsethicf Detective Association. In every 
phase of life's activities in which he has engaged he has put forth his best 
efforts and because of the estimable qualities of character which he has shown 
in his daily life he has won and retains to an eminent degree the sincere re- 
spect and confidence of his neighbors. He is a man among men and deserves 
representation in a work of the nature of the one at hand. 



GEORGE W. GRISMORE. 

It is at all times very interesting to compile and preserve the experiences 
of the old soldiers who went to fight the country's battles during the slave- 
holders' rebellion fifty years ago. These gallant old fellows are fast passing 
away, and we should get all of their experiences first hand, before they pass 
away and leave no record. It is important that we preserve these personal 
experiences, for after all those are the events which make history. What 
would history be worth were it not for the vivid actions of the individuals? 
That is all there is to the splendid histories of ancient and modern times. The 



602 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

story as told by one who passed through the bloody experiences of four years 
of struggle and was in numerous battles, marches, campaigns, and, perhaps, 
prisons and hospitals, is far more interesting than if narrated long hence by 
some writer who may distort events out of their true historic significance. 
One of the honored "boys in blue" who can recall many interesting reminis- 
cences of the great civil conflict of the sixties is George W. Grismore, who, 
after a successful life as farmer and stock raiser, is now living retired in the 
town of Kingman, Fountain county. 

Mr. Grismore was born in Washington county, Indiana, August 31, 
1845, an d ' s tne son °f Albert and Lizzie Jane (Brewer) Grismore. Grand- 
father Brewer was from Pennsylvania, coming from that state to southern 
Indiana in an early day, and cleared land where the city of Jeffersonville now 
stands. Later he sold his farm there in small pieces for town property, 
finally moving to Jackson county and locating on White river, where he 
opened up a big farm and a saw-mill. He later sold out there and bought 
property in Davis county, this state, then retired from active life, moving to 
the town of Bloomfield, where his death occurred. His family consisted of 
eight children, namely: George, who died in California in 1908; John and 
David both live in Davis county; Albert M. died several years ago; the other 
four children died in early life. 

Six children were born to Albert Grismore and wife, namely: Frank, 
who lives in Kentucky; Mary W 7 hiten lives in New York; George W., of 
this review; John died in 191 1; Robert died in 1910 in Missouri; Newton 
lives in Areola, Illinois. 

George W. Grismore, of this sketch, grew to manhood on the home 
farm and he received his education in the common schools. In December, 
1870, he was united in marriage to Sarah J. Atkinson, daughter of Jonathan 
and Charlotte (Pethoud) Atkinson; they were both born in Indiana, but 
their parents originally came to this state from North Carolina, very early. 

Mr. Grismore came to Fountain county in 1867 and settled three miles 
southwest of Kingman and there followed farming very successfully until 
his retirement some time ago. He now lives in a pleasant home in the town 
of Kingman, having accumulated a competency through his life of activity 
as a general agriculturist. 

In November, 18G4, Mr. Grismore enlisted in Company C, One Hun- 
dred and Forty- fourth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, under Captain Atkinson, 
and he saw considerable hard service in the Army of the Cumberland. He 
was mustered out on August 17, 1865, after making a very commendable 
record as a soldier for the Union, and received an honorable discharge, re- 
ceiving his pay and discharge at Indianapolis. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 603 

Nine children have been born to the subject and wife, namely: Eva 
died when thirty- four years of age, at home; Josephine married a Mr. Gib- 
son, of Chicago; Bryon lives in Kingman, this county; Aland married Henry 
Detlef, of Chicago; G. M. lives in Chicago; Park lives in Kingman: Goldie, 
who remained at home, died when twenty-one years of age; Myrta and Roy, 
both deceased. 

Mr. Grismore is the owner of fifty-two acres of good land in Parke 
county and three acres in Kingman, all well improved and valuable. Politi- 
cally, he is a Republican, but has never cared for office. He belongs to the 
Friends church. 



DAVID PL MOFFITT. 

One of the most popular and most efficient officials of Warren county, 
Indiana, is David H. Moffitt, county auditor. His family is one of the oldest 
and best known in that part of the country, and he and his father have been 
untiring in their work for the public in promoting municipal improvements 
and taking active interest in all movements looking toward the general wel- 
fare of the community. He has always been interested in the work of the 
county, having known practically no other occupation, and is well equipped 
to handle the duties of the office. 

Mr. Moffitt was born at Pine Village, Adams township, Warren county, 
Indiana, August 31, 1862, and his parents were William and Mary E. (War- 
ner) Moffitt. His father was born at Independence, Warren county, and his 
mother was a native of Hartford, Connecticut. His father was one of the 
most prominent men in that part of the country. He was a soldier in the 
Civil war, serving as second lieutenant of Company H, One Hundred and 
Sixteenth Regiment Indiana Volunteers, and captain of Company G, One 
Hundred and Fiftieth Regiment Indiana Volunteers. He taught school be- 
fore the war in his native county. After the war he served as deputy auditor, 
from 1865 until his election as auditor in 1868. He was re-elected auditor 
of Warren county in 1872 and again in 1880, and 1884, serving four terms 
all together. He died April 2, 1886, while in office. As a mathematician Will- 
iam Moffitt had few equals. He was universally and deservedly popular, 
and was highly respected by his friends and neighbors. Mr. Moffitt was a 
member of the Grand Army of the Republic, the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. Mrs. Moffitt died November 1, 1909. 
They were the parents of five children : Fanny A. is the wife of Frank Dem- 



604 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

mary, of Williamsport, Indiana; Jennie C. is the widow of John A. Hattoh; 
Annie M, married George Stump, of Independence, Kansas; Georgia A. 
Moffitt died in infancy in 1867. 

David H. Moffitt received a good common school education, and this 
was supplemented by two years at Purdue University, Lafayette, Indiana. 
Upon leaving school he returned to Warren county and became deputy re- 
corder of that county, which position he held for over a year, and then be- 
came deputy auditor under his father. He retained this position for six 
years. At his father*s death he was appointed auditor to till the unexpired 
term. From this tim on he worked in the auditor's office oft" and on, and 
later was again chosen deputy auditor. In 19 10 Mr. Moffitt was elected 
auditor, taking office January 1, 191 1, and the public is well satisfied with 
its choice in Warren county, as he is well liked all over the county, being the 
most popular official the county has ever had. 

Mr. Moffitt was married September 12, 1905, to Grace Overman, the 
daughter pf Charles and Mollie (Herokl) Overman, of Francesville, Indiana. 
They have never had any children. 

Mr. Moffitt is a Republican, politically speaking, and is also a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is active in the social and 
political life of the community in which he lives, and is well acquainted all 
over the county. Mr. Moffitt knows his work thoroughly, and Warren 
county is to be congratulated in having a man of such a good education and 
thorough training in its auditor's office. His name will nut soon be forgotten 
in that part of the country. 



OLIVER BLAKELEY. 

This well known citizen is another of the gallant boys who, a half cen- 
tury ago, enlisted to save the Union. He was little more than a boy when he 
went out to fight his country's battles and during that ever memorable strug- 
gle he was found ready for action, no matter how dangerous or arduous the 
duty. He did not enter the service as some did, from motives of sport and 
frolic, but saw beneath the surface and realized that the South was deter- 
mined to break up the Union for the purpose of establishing a confederacy of 
slave-holding states. From his earliest years he had been taught to hate 
slavery and to do all he could to obliterate it from this country's escutcheon. 
He regarded it as a foul blot on the old flag, so that when the rebels pre- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 605 

cipitated the conflict he was ready to take up arms to preserve the Union. 
He is one of our descendants of pioneer stock, his progenitors having braved 
the wilds of the great Wabash valley when settlers were few and wild beasts 
many. 

Oliver Blakeley, of Covington, Fountain county, Indiana, was born in 
the town where he now resides, on November 30, 1846. He is the son of Sam- 
uel and Mary (Lacy) "Blakeley, who were among the early settlers of this 
count)'. The father was born in Union county, Ohio, and from there he 
came here in 1840. The mother having taken up her residence here with her 
parents in 1830, her people being from North Carolina, whither they moved 
after the war of 1812, the maternal grandfather of the subject having been a 
drummer boy in the American army, and was with General Hull's troops 
which surrendered Detroit to the British. Grandfather Blakeley was also a 
soldier in the war of 1812, but his services were far removed from that of the 
other grandfather, Mr. Blakeley having fought with General Jackson at the 
battle of New Orleans. Grandmother Bennett, on the father's side of the 
house, was a native of Scotland, from which country she emigrated to 
American shores when young. 

Four children were born to Samuel Blakeley and wife, only one of whom, 
Oliver D., of this sketch, is living. The elder Blakeley's death occurred on 
June 2i, 1899, at Covington, and the mother passed away on August 9, 1888. 

Oliver Blakeley grew to manhood in Covington and here he received 
his education in the common schools. When only fifteen years of age he en- 
listed, on December 10, 1861, in Company G, Fortieth Indiana Volunteer In- 
fantry, and he served four years and twenty-one days, during which time he 
participated in a number of important campaigns and hotly-contested en- 
gagements, including the great battle of Shiloh, Stone's River, Perryville, 
and the assault on Missionary Ridge, after which he marched to the relief of 
Burnside. On February 23, 1864, he re-enlisted as a veteran volunteer, and 
joined Sherman's army, with which he marched through Georgia. His regi- 
ment led the assault on Kenesaw Mountain, June 27, 1864, gallantly leading 
the charge of the Fourth Corps. With this corps the subject was sent with 
General Thomas to fight Hood in the latter's attempted raid on the North. 
The subject was wounded in the battle of Missionary Ridge. He was always 
on duty until he was made a mounted orderly, under Gen. D. S. Stanley. 
Later he went to Texas with Sheridan's army, and was mustered out of the 
service at Victoria, that state, January 23, 1866, after a most praiseworthy 
career in defense of his country. 



606 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

After returning b me from the war Mr, Blakeley attended school, and 
the following summer he learned plastering, also the bricklayer's trade, but 
later took up farming and is still actively engaged in general agricultural 
pursuits. In April he rented and moved to Covington, where he now resides. 
He is the owner of eighty acres of valuable land, also city property, all well 
improved. He has been very successful in his life work and has a well im- 
proved farm. 

On May 7, 1877, Mr. Blakeley was united in marriage with .Margaret 
Bodine. daughter of John and Caroline (Brewer) Bodine. Her lather was a 
native of Ohio, from which state he came to Fountain county, Indiana, in an 
early day, and her grandfather was one of the very first settlers here, having 
established his log cabin in the woods here in 1820, and entered land from 
the government. He was the largest land owner in the county when he died. 

Five children have been born to Air. and Mrs. Blakeley, namely: Ora, 
who married George LaTourette, deceased, is living at Covington; Avis, 
who married William C. Crhn, a banker, lives at West Frankfort, Illinois; 
Nellie is bookkeeper at the Leader store in Covington, and lives at home; 
Elizabeth died when ten years old: Frances married F. Roscoe Lowe, who is 
living at Mt. Rainier, Maryland, employed by the civil service commissioner. 
Mr. Blakeley is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, and attends 
different churches. 



BENJAMIN F. CRANE. 

An excellent example of what a man can accomplish while yet young in 
years, if he has natural ability and strength of character and is persistent and 
straightforward in his everyday affairs, is shown by the record of Benjamin 
F. Crane, one of the most progressive agriculturists of Van Buren township 
and one of the worthiest native sons of Fountain county, and, judging from 
his past splendid record as a business man and citizen, the future for him is 
unquestionably bright. 

Mr. Crane represents one of our worthiest pioneer families, members of 
which have lived and labored here for considerably more than three-quarters 
of a century, and they have thus been instrumental in the upbuilding of the 
locality. The subject was born in Fountain county, Indiana, May 14, 1850. 
He is the son of James and Anna (Schnorf) Crane. The father was born 
in Warren county, Ohio. These parents both came to this county in 1828. 
He settled in the wilderness in this county as early as 1827, when there was 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 60/ 

little improvement for miles around and wild beasts were the principal deni- 
zens of the Country. They were people of industry arid in due course of time 
owned fine farms and good homes, which they wrested from a resisting nature 
by their close application and good management. James Crane, the father, 
made the trip from his old home in Ohio to Fountain county on horseback, 
or rather, walked, there being four in the party, the women riding. They 
settled in Van Buren township near Stone Bluff, and there established their 
permanent home on a farm, and his death occurred in Covington in July, 
1875, his wife following him to the grave a few days later, dying in August 
of the same year. They became the parents of eleven children, all now de- 
ceased but the subject of this sketch; they were named as follows: (1) 
Jonathan, (2) William, (3) Eliza, (4) Mary, (5) Indiana; {b) Jacob, and 
(7) Benjamin F., the latter being the youngest of the family; four children 
died in infancy. 

Mr. Crane grew to manhood on the home farm and when a boy he as- 
sisted with the general work there. Attending the common schoois during 
the winter months, he received a good practical education. He was married 
on November 14, 1S74, to Margaret E. Irvin, daughter of William and Mary 
(Hawk) lrvin, the father being a native of Indiana. 

To the subject and wife eleven children have been born, named a.^ fol- 
lows: James W., who lives on a farm west of Stone Bluff; Frankie died aged 
two years; Myrtle is employed in Craw fords ville, Indiana, as teacher of 
domestic science; Zua married John E. Leonard, wdio is engaged in the in- 
surance business at Danville; Pearl married William Allen and they live in 
the town of Attica, this county ; Ruth C. married William C. Foster, a farmer 
of Shawnee township; Julia married S. J. Board, a farmer of Van Buren 
township; Margaret, who is at home with her parents, is attending school at 
Veedersburg; Anna M. and Irvin Eldo are both at home. 

Mr. Crane has always been a farmer and he has been very successful in 
his chosen field of endeavor. He at this writing is renting land, but at one 
time he was the owner of five hundred acres of valuable land. Disposing of 
half of this to his family, he still owns two hundred and fifty acres, one hun- 
dred and thirty acres lying in Van Buren township, the balance being near 
Bloomington, of which he owns a half interest. For many years he has 
bought, raised and sold live stock, making a specialty of high grade Polanges 
cattle and Poland China hogs, and from time to time he had splendid sales 
on his registered hogs 



60S FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Politically, Mr. Crane is a Republican. He was a member of the board 
of commissioners for three years, and was chairman of the board lor two 
years. He belongs to the .Anti-Horse Thief Association, and in religious 
matters is a member of the Christian chruch. He was treasurer of the con- 
ference for a period of twenty-four years, having been elected twelve times 
in succession, but he finally resigned. He has long been a leader in this de- 
nomination and has done much good in his work in this line. He is at pres- 
ent a trustee of the Union Christian College, at Merom, Sullivan county, In- 
diana. He is a self-made man, has kept well informed on current topics of 
the times, is well read and a progressive citizen in every respect and merits 
the material success and the high esteem of the people which have long been 
his. 

Mr. Crane assisted in the organization of the Shawnee Telephone Com- 
pany in 1900; also sold the stock, and is today a director and stockholder. 
Recently he helped to organize the Farmers State Bank of Veedersburg and 
is also a stockholder and director of that institution. 



PAUL HOST. 



The thrift, ability and industry of the inhabitants of Holland is prover- 
bial. Placed in a country without natural advantages, they have literally 
carved a nation out of the sea, and have become prosperous where other peo- 
ples, without their inbred racial efficiency, would have perished. The same 
temperament which has enabled them to maintain their nation in so high a 
place enables the sons of this nation to attain prosperity when placed amid 
the strange conditions of a new country. Paul Host, a young man with no 
knowledge of the customs and language of the country, came to America and, 
though struggling at first with difficulties incomprehensible to one who has 
never been an immigrant to a foreign land, has won a success far greater than 
many of America's native sons who had greater opportunities. 

Paul Host was born in Holland on September 14, 1847, me son of Paul' 
and Bell Host. His parents left him an orphan while still young. Of their 
family none are alive save Paul and one sister. In 1874 he came to this coun- 
try and located in Jackson township, Tippecanoe county, Indiana, beginning as 
a farm hand, and carefully saving his toilsome earning. In 1893 ^ e m oved to 
Davis township, Fountain county, and bought one hundred and sixty-two 
acres of land, to which he later added twenty-three more. This farm he has 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. DCK) 

brought up to an excellent condition, having spent four thousand dollars upon 
its improvement. He has all of it well ditched and tile drained, has good 
fences, substantial barns, and a commodious and comfortable home. 

In 1874 Mr. Host was married in his home country of Holland to Emma 
Vereheye, the daughter of Peter and Sophia Verehcvc. The wedding journey 
was the long trip across the ocean to the land of opportunity. To this mar- 
riage were born four children : Minnie, the oldest, married James Crow, an 
elevator man of Shadeland, who also rents land and farms it with the aid of 
his family of boys, the oldest of whom, fifteen years in age, weighs one hun- 
dred and seventy-five pounds and is stronger than the average man ; Sophia, 
the second child, married R. II. Kerr, now sheriff of the county, and is living 
at Covington; Mary married John Paul, and lives at West Point, Indiana, 
where they farm; Charles S., who is farming on his father's farm, married 
Mary Monat, and has three children, Mary, Pauline and Wilhelmina. His 
home, which his father built for him, is but a few rods from his father's, and 
now he is carrying on the brunt of the actual work of the farm. 

Paul Host is independent in politics. He is a member of the Catholic 
church. When he first came to this country, he did not have a dollar, and he 
has worked at the hardest labor twelve and fourteen hours many a day for 
fifty cents. Now, although not a rich man in these days of millionaires, he is 
the owner of a reliable "E. M. F." motor car, and is able to take life with 
ease, enjoyment and contentment, his early hard work having provided the 
means to spend his later days in contentment. He is a man who stands well 
with his neighbors, all of whom respect his sound judgment. 



WILLIAM DICE, JR. 

It is indeed a rare and great privilege to be permitted to spend our lives 
in the old home. There is, as Tennyson says, a charm beneath "the roofs that 
heard our earliest cry" that is lacking anywhere else we may go, no matter 
whether the individual be a person of sentiment and highly developed emo- 
tional nature, or not. But for one reason or another, from some whim of 
fate or allurement of the spirit of the wanderlust which is felt early in life 
by almost all, we become separated from the home on which we first opened 
our wondering eyes and no matter how much of the pleasing and valuable 
things of the world we may surround ourselves with in other lands and 

(39) 



6lO FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

climes, the new home we have builded for ourselves will lack that hallowed 
atmosphere, that inscrutable charm that clusters about the hearthstone of the 
old home that our childhood knew. So they who are rtunate enough to 
continue their earthly existence in the abode of their fathers should be fully 
appreciative of the same. One of these lucky residents of Fountain county 
is William Dice, Jr., a progressive fanner of Van Buren township, who was 
born and has always lived in the same home, which is located one and one- 
half miles from Veedersburg. 

The subject is the son of William and Martha (Norris) Dice, and the 
grandson of John Dice, one of the early settlers of this county. For a fuller 
history of the Dice family the reader is directed to the sketch of Franklin 
Dice, appearing elsewhere in this volume. The father of the subject was a 
native of Rockbridge county, Virginia, and in early life he came to Fountain 
county, Indiana, and settled on the old Henry Dice farm and here he devoted 
his life successfully to general farming, and reared his family of five children, 
who were named as follows: Frank, deceased; Sarah, who married Frank 
Holowell, a miller, is deceased; Frances married Harris Glascock, a farmer 
living at Sterling, this county; Olive is deceased; William, Jr., subject of this 
sketch. 

Politically, the father of the above named children was a Republican, 
but was not a public man, and in religious matters he was a member of the 
Christian church. 

William Dice, Jr., grew to manhood on the home farm and there began 
working in the fields when but a boy, and he received his education in the 
common schools, and he has always devoted his life to farming, owning now 
the homestead, having purchased the interests of the other heirs, his place 
consisting of one hundred and sixty-seven acres, which he has kept so skill- 
fully tilled that it has retained its original fertility. He has kept the place 
well improved in every respect. He has remodeled the dwelling house, built 
a new barn, laid cement walks and porches, and he now has a veiy desirable 
and pleasant place. He carries on general farming, devoting much time to 
his fine live stock, making a specialty of Poland China hogs and Jersey cattle. 

Mr. Dice was married in 1887 to Susa Wilson, daughter of Fred and 
Anna (Epler) Wilson, natives of Pennsylvania, from which state they emi- 
grated to Fountain county, Indiana, in an early day. Mr. Wilson was a stone 
cutter by trade. He lived in Covington during the latter part of his life. His 
family consisted of four children, namely : Sarah, who died when three years 
■old; Henry and John both live in Covington; Susa, who married Mr. Dice, 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 6ll 

of this sketch. One child has been born to the subject and wife, Ruth, who 
married James Thomas, a farmer living in Cain township. 

Politically, Mr. Dice is a Republican, but he has never been active in 
political matters, nor has he held any office, preferring to lead a quiet home 
life. 



G. E. FOSTER. 



In looking over the list of progressive business men of Fountain count}', 
Indiana, we find no name worthier of special mention in a work of the prov- 
ince of that at hand than the one which initiates this paragraph, G. E. Foster, 
well known grain dealer of Shawnee township. He has been a resident 
of this count)' all his life, and he has ever had its interests at heart, and, 
while advancing his own welfare he has done much toward promulgating the 
civic, industrial and moral tone of the community. His career has been one 
of. hard work and integrity, consequently he is deserving of the respect in 
which he is held by everyone. 

Mr. Foster was born in Logan township, Fountain county, Indiana, 
March 9, i860. He is a son of Basil and Eliza (Harlan) Foster, natives of 
Ohio and Alabama, respectively. Basil Foster farmed all his life in Logan 
township, this county, and became well known there. I! lived on the land 
entered by his father from the government, and there his death occurred in 
1872, at the age of fifty-six years, his widow surviving many years, passing 
away in 1900 at the, advanced age of eighty-one years. They were the par- 
ents of eleven children, namely : Clinton J. and M. L. are both rural mail car- 
riers, out of the town of Attica, Indiana; Alta married L. G. Martin, a lum- 
ber dealer at Attica; G. E., subject of this sketch. The other seven children 
are all deceased. Their father was a Republican in politics, and their mother 
was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

G. E. Foster grew to manhood on the home farm and he received his 
education in the common schools of the township and at Attica. Early in 
life, in 1878, he entered the grocery business in Attica and continued the 
same successfully until January, 191 1, having been in partnership with his 
brother, Newman P. Foster, now deceased, during the first eighteen years of 
the period mentioned, and they enjoyed a large trade with the town and 
surrounding country, under the firm name of Foster Brothers. The rest of 
the time the subject operated his store alone. In January, 191 1, he sold his 
grocery business and purchased the grain elevator at Rob Roy, which he has 



6l2 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

since operated, enjoying a large and rapidly growing trade with a wide terri- 
tory round about. He has managed well and has accumulated a comfortable 
competency. 

Mr. Foster was married on January 28, 1886; to Hattie G. Mosier, 
daughter of Daniel and Amanda (Tuttle) Mosier, a highly respected Foun- 
tain county family. To this union have been born the following children: 
Alta Mary, a graduate of Lake Forest; Herbert Fdward, a graduate of the 
University of Illinois and an architectural engineer of Chicago; Donald 
Daniel, the youngest. 

Politically, Mr. Foster is a Republican, but he has never been active in 
political affairs. He devotes all his time and attention to his grain business. 



FRANKLIN DICE. 



It is a well known fact, fully recognized by physicians and by all others 
who have made the subject a study, that a quiet life and steady habits pro- 
mote longevity. In the cities where the people are falling over each other in 
their desperate attempts to get rich suddenly, and where they are, of a conse- 
quence, on a severe nervous strain all the time, the mortality tables are much 
higher than in the country. The farmer may, therefore, congratulate him- 
self that, though his life may be less eventful, it is certainly much longer 
and more satisfactory in the main than that of his cousin in the city. This 
important fact should be borne in mind when the young men of the rural 
districts contemplate going into the cities and taking some poorly-paid posi- 
tion in a store or machine shop, and thus grind out their lives. How much 
better is the healthful life of the farmer who has developed a productive 
place from the virgin soil, reared his family in the comfortable home which 
he has himself made and is known and respected by his neighbors near and 
far. Some such man is Franklin Dice, a venerable and honored agriculturist 
of Van Buren township, whose sturdy old age is no doubt the result of right 
living in the country. 

Mr. Dice is one of the oldest native sons of Fountain county, and here 
he has spent his long and industrious life, having lived to see the community 
advance from a wilderness to one of the leading farming sections of the state. 
His birth occurred in Van Buren township, this county, May 10, 1830. He 
is the son of John and Elizabeth (Hop) Dice, both parents bom in 1817. the 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 613 

father in Rockbridge county, Virginia, and the mother in West Virginia. 
The subject's paternal grandfather came here in 1827 and settled in Van 
Buren township, having purchased land from a Mr. Funk, the place being 
partly improved, and here he spent the rest of his life engaged in farming, 
and was well known among the pioneers. His son, John Dice, lived on an 
eighty-acre farm here also. His family consisted of seven children, namely : 
William, John and Jacob are all deceased; Henry, deceased; Franklin, of this 
sketch; George, also deceased; James is deceased. 

Politically, the father of the above named children was a Democrat, 
and he belonged to the Presbyterian church. He was a plain, hard-working, 
honest man who had many friends. 

Franklin Dice grew to manhood on the home farm and he knew the 
meaning of hard work when but a boy. He received such education as he 
could in the old log school house, in which was a fire place across one end, 
greased paper for window panes and slabs for seats. He began his life work 
by clerking in a general store at Chambersburg, this township, but desiring 
to make agriculture his life work, he purchased his present farm, on which 
he has lived for a period of sixty years, having taken up his residence here in 
1852 and he has been very successful as a general farmer and stock raiser, 
his fine place of two hundred and forty-two acres, all tillable, being one of 
the choice farms of the township. He has rotated his crops and so skillfully 
manipulated the soil that it has retained its original fertility. He has a 
pleasant home and large, convenient outbuildings. For years he has made a 
specialty of raising graded hogs and sheep. He has made all the improve- 
ments on the place, which is very admirably situated just east of Stone Bluff. 
He is now living in practical retirement, merely overseeing his farm. 

Mr. Dice was married in 1851 to Melinda Redden, daughter of William 
and Kittora (Glascock) Redden, old settlers of this county, having come here 
from Kentucky. Six children have been born to the subject and wife, 
namely: Ollie, deceased; Ginevra married Wallace Campbell, of Cain town- 
ship, this county ; Walsey married Lottie Romine, and they live on part of the 
subject's farm ; Hattie, who married John Campbell, lives in Troy township, 
this county, her husband being deceased; Flora is deceased; Boswick lives in 
Van Buren township. f 

Politically, Mr. Dice is a Republican and he has always been loyal to his 
party. He has served the people as township clerk to the satisfaction of all 
concerned. He belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Stone 



614 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Bluff. Religiously, he is a member of the United Brethren church. He ii 
deserving of a great deal of credit for what he has accomplished, having 
made what he has by his own efforts. 



JOHN VAN REED. 



Through a residence of nearly sixty years in Warren county, John Van 
Reed, long one of the most progressive and careful tillers of the soil in 
Liberty township, and who, having accumulated a competency, is now spend- 
ing his declining years in quiet and in the midst of plenty in his comfortable 
home in Liberty township, is a man who can be trusted at all times and places, 
one who has been honorable and successful in business, loyal to his duties of 
citizenship and faithful to his many friends. His career and the agricultural 
history of Liberty township have been very closely inter woven, therefore, as 
well for his long and prominent connection with the growth and prosperity 
of the community as for his sterling rectitude of character is his life record 
presented to the readers of this volume. 

John Van Reed was born on May 29, 1S53, in Liberty township, War- 
ren county, Indiana, about two and a half miles west of Williamsport, on the 
old Van Reed farm, which was purchased from the government in ^832. His 
parents were Levi R. and Amelia (Bowman) Van Reed. The father, who 
was a native of Pennsylvania, made three trips to Indiana on horseback, 
bringing his. wife with him on the last trip and settling in Warren county. 
Prior to coming to this state, however, he had lived in the state of Missis- 
sippi for a short period. 

John Van Reed secured his elementary education in the common schools 
of his neighborhood, supplementing this study at Stockwell and Lafayette 
schools. During the interims between school terms he had applied himself to 
the work of the farm and before he had attained his majority he was, be- 
cause of the death of his father, compelled to take upon himself the man- 
agement and operation of the home farm. He is now the owner of two hun- 
dred and seventy acres of as fine land as can be found in this part of Warren 
county. To the operation 'of this 'farm Mr. Van Reed gives his entire atten- 
tion and he. has met with a success fully commensurate with the labor be- 
stowed. The place is' well 'improved in every respect and bears abundant 
evidence of the'careful and painstaking habits'of the owner. In addition to 
the cultivation of the soil, some live stock is raised, and twentieth-century 
methods are employed in the conduct of the farm. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 615 

In 1875 Mr. Van Reed was united in marriage to Zuillah Burr, the 
daughter of Nelson Burr, of an old Eastern family. To Mr. and Mrs. Van 
Reed have been born two children, namely: Eugene N, who married Pearl 
Cavalt, and they have four children, Lucile, Louis, Marguerite and John E. ; 
Earl married Julia Gilliett. Eugene possesses unusual musical talent and has 
composed much good music. He is also one of the best penmen in the United 
States, being now engaged as a teacher in that art. Earl graduated from the 
Attica public schools and the State Normal School at Terre Haute, after 
which he took a full course in medicine in the Indiana Medical College at 
Indianapolis, and he is now 7 a successful practicing physician at Lafayette. 
He belongs, to the state and county medical societies and is now serving as 
coroner of Tippecanoe county. 

Politically, Mr. Van Reed is a Republican and is now a member of the 
county board of commissioners. He has served efficiently on the county cen- 
tral committee of his party, representing the West Liberty precinct. 

Fraternally, Mr. Van Reed is a member of the Knights of Pythias and 
endeavors to exemplify in his daily life the sublime principles of that' splendid 
order. Religiously, the family are identified with the Presbyterian church. 
The Van Reed home is an attractive one and is known to the many friends 
of the family as a place of old-time hospitality. 



JOHN A. JOHNSON. 

One of the enterprising farmers of Wabash township, who has spent his 
life in Fountain county/ where his family has been well and favorably known 
since the pioneer, epoch is John A. Johnson, a man who believes in doing, well 
whatever is worth doing at all. and Jn ..leading an upright and helpful life 
while he is laboring to advance his individual interests and for these and 
other commendable traits he is deserving of the high respect which is freely 
accorded him by all who know him. 

Mr.' Johnson's birth occurred' in the township where he still resides on 
January 25, 1854. He is the son of Alexander' and.Melviha" (Spinks). John- 
son, the former also a native. of Wabash township, Fountain county. James 
Johnson, the paternal grandfather, who was a native of Pennsylvania, moved 
from that state to Ohio, thence to Indiana and took up his residence in Wa- 
bash township, Fountain county, entering the present Johnson homestead 
from the government in the year 1826, thus being among the earliest settlers 



6l6 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, IN! IANA. 

in this sec.ioh of the state, having begun life here when neighbors were far 
remote and he literally carved out a home from the primeval woods. And 
here Alexander Johnson grew to manhood and he spent his life engaged in 
general agricultural pursuits, with the exception of four years, when he lived 
in Perrysville, during which time he operated a ferry on the Wabash river. 
He was a good farmer and had a well improved place and a good home. His 
wife, Melvina Spinks, was a native of Kentucky,- from which state she came 
to this county when a young woman. They became the parents of six chil- 
dren, namely: Gavan Manford is deceased; Eliza J. married William I. 
Snoddy; John A., subject of this sketch; James H., who lives at Parrysville, 
Indiana, is agent there for the Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad Com- 
pany; Mary D. and Iola A. are both deceased. 

John A. Johnson was reared on the home farm and there he worked 
hard when a boy, and he received a very fair education in the common schools 
of his district. Early in life he took up general farming for a livelihood, 
which he has continued to follow to the present time, and he is now the owner 
of a very productive place of eighty-nine and one-fourth acres, which he has 
kept well improved and well cultivated, located eight miles south of the county 
line in one of the rich farming districts of the county, and here he is making 
a very comfortable living. 

Mr. Johnson was married to Ann M. Spinks, daughter of James H. and 
Adeline (Wilson) Spinks, both natives of Kentucky, from which state they 
came to Fountain county, Indiana, in an early day and here they still reside. 
Two children have been born to the subject and wife, named as follows: 
Alexander H. and Grace E., both living at home. 

Politically, Mr. Johnson is a Democrat, but he does not aspire to be a 
public man. 



REV. ALFRED R. HEATH. 

The good that a noble character like the Rev. A. R. Heath can do in the 
course of a long and active life is indeed incalculable and cannot be measured 
in metes and bounds, in fact, cannot be known until the "last great day, when 
the trump shall sound and the dead shall be raised incorruptible." He has 
devoted his life to the good of others, has lived an unselfish, helpful and 
altruistic life and thousands have been made better and had their life-paths 
made easier and brighter by having known him. So that to-day he is 




A. k.'Hum 



FOUNTAIN AND WAUREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 617 

eminently entitled to the high esteem in which he is universally held. 1 tow- 
ever, he cares naught for the plaudits of men. being happy in the thought that 
he is following in the footsteps of the lowly Nazarene and doing his every 
duty as he sees and understands it. 

Rev. Heath was born in Fountain county February 7, 1826, and is 
therefore one of our honored pioneers, his parents having come here when 
the country was the home of but a few widely scattered families and when 
there were no roads or conveniences of any kind, but they were courageous 
people and braved the wntls in order that future generations might be bene- 
fited. He is the son of Jeremiah and Nellie (Johnston) Heath. The father 
was born in Rowan count)', North Carolina, and when a young man he came 
overland to Indiana, settling in what is now Troy township, Fountain county, 
where by dint of hard and persistent toil he developed a farm from the woods 
and established the permanent family home, devoting the rest of his life to 
agricultural pursuits. He began life here in a rude log cabin and was ten 
miles from any neighbor. The town of Covington had not then been thought 
of, its site being covered with the primeval forest. Here he became influential 
in the early development of the county and was known as a strong character, 
honest, hospitable and public spirited. He served as the first assessor of the 
county, the position requiring a great deal of traveling, which had to be made 
on horseback along the paths through the woods, and there was not much 
property to be assessed in those days. He was a fine old gentleman and 
known and loved by all the early settlers. His latchstring was always out 
to all passersby. His only child was A. R. Heath, subject of this sketch. He 
was a Democrat, and he belonged to the Christian church. 

Archibald Johnston, the maternal grandfather of the subject, was also a 
native of North Carolina. During the Revolutionary war, when the soldiers 
were in his community, he was in danger of being shot, for though but ten 
years of age, he was almost as large as a grown man. However, he donned 
his sister's dress and worked in the fields without being molested. During the 
three days that his life hung in the balance he learned to pray and thereby 
became a devout Christian the balance of his life, and he did all he could to 
unite the churches, and was a great churchman. When a young man he left 
his native state and moved to Tennessee where he entered land from the 
government, on which he lived several years, then sold out for six dollars per 
acre, having paid one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre for the same. 
From Tennessee he came to Whitewater, Indiana, where he took up govern- 
ment land which he improved and later sold at a profit, then came to Wabash 
township. Fountain county, where he again took up government land which he 



6l8 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

developed into a fine farm and there spent the rest of his life. lie was a 
typical pioneer in even- respect, a brave, large-hearted man. He had a family 
of nine children, and before he died he gave each of those living forty acres. 
At one time he owned the farm on which the subject now resides. His house 
was used for church purposes for many years. He would move out his beds 
and other furnishings in order to make room for the meetings. It was in 
the year 1821 that he took up his residence here, being thus one of the very 
first to brave the wilds of this section of the state. 

Rev. A. R. Heath grew to manhood on the homestead in this county and 
there assisted with the general work and received such education as the old- 
time schools afforded, but he is principally self-taught, having ever been a 
profound student and is widely read and well versed in Holy Writ. He has 
devoted his life to farming and the ministry, and was also in the mercantile 
business, owning at different times three general stores. At one time he 
was the owner of four hundred acre- of valuable, productive land in Troy 
township, but this has been divided among his children, and he now lives on 
the old 'home place. At one time he owned two thousand two hundred acres 
of land in Kansas which he bought at fifty-seven cents and a half per acre, 
and has sold all but' thirty-seven acres at prices ranging up to fifty dollars per 
acre. By the increase in value and the sale of his Kansas land he was 
enabled to travel for seven years, soliciting funds for the erection and endow- 
.ment of Union Christian College at Merom, Indiana, and was so successful 
that when he finished his labors, the buildings were completed, the college out 
of debt, and in addition had an endowment fund of one hundred thousand dol- 
lars. He also traveled two years for the Christian Publishing House of Dayton, 
Ohio, and secured funds for the equipment of a' printing plant and book- 
bindery. He was a member of the building committee which erected the 
college and publishing house. He has been very successful as a general 
farmer and stock raiser, being one of the leading general agriculturists of the 
county, having kept his land well improved and well cultivated so that it has- 
retained its original fertility and strength of soil. He has preached for the 
past sixty years wherever -he found a place to carry the Gospel message and he 
has done great good in revivals and in strengthening various churches. He 
is. an earnest, logical and not infrequently an eloquent speaker and he is always 
listened to with much interest wherever "he preaches. 

Rev. Mr. Heath was married on June 15, 1847, to Mary Maxwell, daugh- 
ter of John B. and Sarah (Conovcr) Maxwell, old settlers of this county, 
Mrs. Maxwell now being deceased. 

Six children have been born to the subject and wife, named as follows: 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 619 

Delia; Bloomer, the third, died in infancy; Harpin L. ; Orieta married D. T. 
Morgan, who is at present a member of Congress from Oklahoma; Evin \\ . 
was the youngest in order of birth. 

Personally, the Rev. Mr. Heath is a pleasant man to meet, a kind, 
friendly, hospitable and large-hearted gentleman who strives to do all the 
good he can while passing through the world, for he realizes that he will never 
pass this way again. He has lived an upright, useful and honorable life, one 
that has resulted in great good to those whom it has touched, and he is emi- 
nently worthy of the high respect in which he is held by all classes. 



ALBERT W. GRAHAM. 

It will always be a mark of distinction to have served in the Federal army 
during the great Civil war between the states. The old soldier will receive 
attention no matter where he goes if he will but make himself known, partic- 
ularly if he puts on the old faded uniform. And when he passes away, 
which he will soon do, friends will pay him suitable eulogy for the sacrifices 
he made a half century ago on the battle field or in the no less dreaded hos- 
pital. And ever afterwards his descendants will revere his memory and take 
pride in recounting his services for his country in the hour of peril. Albert 
W. Graham, well known and successful farmer of Troy township. Fountain 
county, is one of the old soldiers who went forth to fight to save the union 
of states. He is the scion of one of our earliest and hardiest pioneer families, 
his father having braved the wilds of primeval banks of the Wabash when 
the dense woods had scarcely heard the ring of the axe or the clear skies been 
stained -by the smoke of a white man's cabin fire-place, and from that re- 
mote period to the present, covering a stretch of ninety years, the Grahams 
have been well and favorably known in this locality and have done much for 
the development of the same, so that there is for man)' reasons a peculiar 
interest in giving their records historical setting. 

Albert W. Graham was born July 10, 1839, m Fountain county, In- 
diana, about one and one-half miles from his present home. He is the son 
of Washington and Elizabeth L. (Alkire) Graham. The father was born in 
May, 1800, and when a young man he came to this county from Ohio in 
1822, and entered land from the government, and after arranging for a log 
cabin he returned to Madison county, Ohio, and spent about two years, then 
returned to his land in Wabash township, Fountain county, cleared and im- 



620 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

proved the same and here engaged successfully in general fanning until his 
death in 1875. His family consisted of seven children, namely: William M. 
and Forgus T., twins, are both deceased; Milton O. lives in Troy township; 
John W. makes his residence in the town of Covington; Agatha C. is living 
with her nephew in Wabash township; Mary E. died in 1852: Albert W., 
subject of this sketch. 

Albert W. Graham grew to manhood on the home farm and there he 
assisted with the general work during the summer months, and lie received his 
education in the common schools in his district, after which he took up 
farming for his life work, which he has followed to the present time, still 
being actively and successfully engaged in general agricultural pursuits, own- 
ing ninety-six and one-half acres of well improved land, which improvements 
he has made himself. His place is located about two miles south of Coving- 
ton. He has made what he has by his own efforts. 

Air. Graham was married in 1871 to Serekla Carwile, whose parents 
were also early settlers of Fountain county ; in fact, they came here among 
the very earliest. 

Politically, Mr. Graham is a Republican. Fie belongs to the Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows, also the Grand Army of the Republic. Post No. 
4, at Covington. 

Mr. Graham enlisted on August 11, 1862, in Company H, Sixty-third 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and he saw much hard service, performing his 
duties as a valiant soldier for the Union. He was mustered out at Greens- 
boro, North Carolina, in 1865, and he was paid and discharged at Indianapo- 
lis, Indiana, the same year. When his first term of enlistment expired and 
the government soon afterward called for more volunteers he offered his 
services for three years more. He served under Captain LaTourette, and 
was a non-commissioned officer during part of his service. 



JOSEPH B. THOMAS. 

The majority of the residents of Fountain county are of American 
stock, their parents or grandparents having come to the comparatively new 
state of Indiana at a time when land was unimproved, and their families have 
preserved in all its vigor the best of the old colonial blood. He whose name 
heads this review is a member of one of the best examples of such families, 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 62 1 

and his own Jiie in all his relations with others has been such as to show m 
an ununstaKaDie manner his own worth and aoiaty. 

Joseph a. Uiomas was Dorn in jacicson township, fountain county, on 
August 13, 1859, the son oi beorge and Julia Rummers ) ihomas. beorge 
Thomas was the son of Joseph B. s who was born in Virginia in 1808, later 
moved to Uhio, then a new slate, where his sun was born 111 1830, and shortly 
afterward he moved from Highland county, Ohio, to Fountain county, In- 
diana, where he bought what was known as the William Allen farm, just 
across the road from the farm where the subject of this review lives, and 
there he spent the remainder of his days in farming, living to a respected old 
age. His son George followed in his footsteps, and followed farming slic- 
es fully all his life. He married Julia Summers, who was born in Parke 
county in 1832. To this union were born five children : Joseph B. ; Alary, 
now Mrs. Thomas Keller, of Jackson township; John VV., of Cayuga, Ver- 
million county, an influential farmer and well-known horseman; Amanda, 
who lives with her brother and sister, and Sarah, w ho married Robert Hop- 
kins, of Sugar Creek township, Parke county. George Thomas died in 1891, 
his wife in '904. He, like his father, was a stanch Democrat and was active 
in politics, being one of the leaders of the party in his community. For many 
years he was justice of the peace, in which capacity he gave universal satis- 
faction. 

Joseph B. Thomas, after completing the common schools, attended the 
normal school at Ladoga, and for three winters taught in the schools of 
Fountain county, at no time, however, ceasing farming operations. For some 
years he lived in Parke county, just across the Fountain county line, and for 
the past twelve years he has contracted for the construction of gravel roads, 
having built several excellent roads in Parke county. He later returned to the 
old home place, on which he was brought up, and is living there in a hand- 
some and comfortable home. He owns two hundred and three acres of good 
land in this county, and one hundred and sixty acres in the Saxon district of 
Missouri. The most of his land is tillable, the rest being well adapted to 
pasturing. He raises graded stock, in which he has been successful, and each 
year ships two carloads of hogs. 

In 1880 Mr. Thomas was married to Elmira Myers, the daughter of 
Alexander and Elizabeth (Roach) Myers. Her father came here in early 
days from North Carolina with his father, Daniel Myers, who took govern- 
ment land in Parke county. Alexander Myers' land was situated in both 
Parke and Fountain counties, the county line passing through it. (See sketch 



622 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

of W. 0. B. Myers for Alexander and Daniel Myers.) To Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas three children were born: George Karl, now at home; Cora, who 
married Albert Lowe, the assistant cashier and president of the Farmers 
Bank of Wallace; and Joseph B., Jr., at home. George Earl followed in his 
father's footsteps and teaches school; his sister Cora was a teacher before her 
marriage. i 

Mr. Thomas and his father have made all the improvements on the pres- 
ent farm, the only house on it when they obtained it being a cabin. The farm 
has been brought to a very profitable degree of cultivation, and Mr. Thomas 
has proved as successful in his farming as he has in his gravel road building. 
He is a man whose opinion is respected, and one veil liked by all who come 
in contact with him. In politics he is a Democrat and a strong party worker, 
but has never cared for office; fraternally, he is a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows at Wallace. He is a reader, keeping well informed 
on all current topics, and has a library well stocked with books. 



J. E. FINE 



In the growth of almost every community in the middle West, one may 
trace three stages, occupying the first three generations. First, the pioneer 
clears the forest and builds the first log cabin, introducing agriculture on a 
small scale. His son builds a comfortable house on the place in the next 
generation, and begins to improve the farm implements and extend his lands. 
His son, in the third stage of growth, when he stays on the old place, turns 
his attention not only to general farming raising of stock, and cultivating the 
ground to the highest extent, but to larger affairs around him, and we find 
him taking an active part in building up financial institutions in the country, 
and encouraging large mercantile enterprises. 

This has been true in the Fine family. The grandfather of J. E. Fine 
left Davidson county, North Carolina, and came to Indiana in 1829 when his 
son David was only twelve years of age. He took government land in Jack- 
son township, Fountain county, and the family still carefully treasures the 
old sheepskin deed, which was issued at that time. He died there in 1856, 
having done his share of the work in the new country. His son David's edu- 
cation Avas limited, but he learned from stern contact with nature the invalu- 
able lessons which prepared him to continue the struggle in the new country 
with credit to himself and family. He married Mary Myers, who was born 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 623 

near his old home in Davidson county, North Carolina, in 1823, and she 
nobly seconded his efforts until his death in 1899. She survived him thirteen 
years, dying in February, 1912, at the age of eighty-eight, and was as bright 
at the time of her death as when she was young. Her loss is keenly felt by J. 
E. Fine and his family. David and Mary Fine had seven children, three of 
whom died in their infancy. Susan married Joseph Wert, a carpenter in 
Wallace, Indiana. Rachel married Albert Roberts, a notary in Wallace, 
Indiana. George, John and Noah are all deceased. J. E. Fine was born in 
Fountain county, Jackson township, on the old homestead February 14, 1859. 
He was educated in the common schools and also took a business course, one 
term, at Wabash College, after which he taught in the district school in 
Jackson township for seven terms. 

In 1881 Mr. Fine married Mariah Keller, daughter of Samuel and 
Catherine (Clodfeller) Keller. Mr. Keller was born in Jackson township 
and has farmed all of his life. He is now living in Wallace, Indiana. They 
have four children: Austin married Atha Osborn, and lives at Wallace; 
Flossie, Earl and Clarence are at home. 

When he was only a young man J. E. F'ine was assessor of Jackson town- 
ship for four years. He then entered the general merchandise business in 
Wallace. He was very prosperous and kept his store there for ten years. 
After that he engaged in the undertaking and furniture business for eight 
years, constantly increasing his financial worth. From 1901 to 1905 he was 
trustee of Jackson township. Then he established The Farmers Bank at 
Wallace, Indiana, in 1907, with a capital of ten thousand dollars, the only 
bank in the place. He is cashier of the bank, A. B. Lowe being the president, 
and William H. Gray, a wealthy farmer of Jackson township, being the vice- 
president. 

Mr. Fine is a Democrat, a member of the Lutheran church, and a Mason 
at Wallace. He owns one hundred and sixty acres of land, part of which is 
the old homestead, first settled by his grandfather and is one of the most 
highly cultivated and productive pieces of land in the county. He also owns 
eight-one acres of land in Texas, near the Markham oil fields, which will 
probably be a great source of wealth to his family. 

Here we see a man who has always been active in all the walks of life. 
Although only fifty-three years of age, he has accomplished more than most 
men do in a life-time. He has been a successful farmer, has built up two 
prosperous mercantile businesses, and established a bank, which was much 
needed in his community, and superintends all its affairs. It will be well if 
the fourth generation can carry as well as he has the line of progress started 
by their forefathers. 



624 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

JAMES BODINE. 

J 11 all that constituted good citizenship and true manhood the late James 
Bodine, for many years one of the substantial agriculturists of Fountain 
county, was a notable example and none stood higher than he in the esteem 
and confidence of the community. His career whs characterized by duty 
faithfully done and by industry, thrift and wisely directed efforts he acquired 
a liberal share of this world's goods, besides earning- a reputation which has 
never been clouded by the commission of a single unworthy act. He was a 
man of good judgment and pronounced views and while he kept himself well 
informed upon current events and taking a lively interest in all public affairs 
of his township and county, he never had any desire to change the quiet and 
contented life on the cozy farm for the distractions and cares which usually 
come to the man who fills official station. He was a man of courage and 
exemplary habits and his pleasant home was known to his many friends as a 
place of old-time hospitality and his kindness to all was most pronounced. 

James Bodine was born in Warren county, Ohio, April 12, 1825, and 
he spent his boyhood years on the farm where he helped with the general 
work, and he received such education as the common schools of that time 
afforded. Early in life he began farming and this continued his chief iife 
work. He came to Fountain county, Indiana, arriving here on June S, 1830.. 
and in due course of time had an excellent farm which he managed in a man- 
ner that yielded a very comfortable annual income. As a general farmer and 
stock raiser he had no superiors in Wabash township. He built several sets of 
improvements on his farm, and his son, Robert, is now living on part of the 
old homestead. The subject believed in progressive methods in agriculture 
and he skillfully rotated his crops and manipulated the soil of his valuable 
farm so that it retained its original fertility. He always handled a good 
grade of live stock. 

Mr. Bodine was married in 1859 to Mary Campbell, daughter of Joseph 
Campbell, a native of Ohio, whose death occurred at the age of seventy-four 
years. The following children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Bodine : Flora, 
Robert, Jennie, Tom, Florence O., Edward, and one who died in infancy. 

Mrs. Bodine is the owner of four hundred and fifty acres in Van Buren 
township, a finely improved and valuable place which she leases to renters, it 
being one of the desirable farms of that vicinity. She lives on the old home 
place in Wabash township. 

Politically, Mr. Bodine was a Democrat, but he was never very active in 




J A MICS KOI II. \ I 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. O25 

public affairs, and held no political offices. His death occurred on August 
27,' 1908, at the advanced age of eighty three years, after a useful and suc- 
cessful life. 



DR. CHARLES A. CAPLINGER. 

Mo service to mankind can be rendered greater than to alleviate the 
sufferings of the sick and disease-stricken; no warfare more important to the 
interests of the human race can be waged than that against disease and sick- 
ness. To this service and this warfare Dr. Charles A. Caplinger has given 
his life, and his success can best be told by those grateful persons whom he 
has raised from beds of pain and brought again into the pursuits of life and 
happiness. 

Dr. Caplinger was born in Montgomery county, Indiana, on November 
12, 1861, the son of Clayton and Mary (Strange) Caplinger. His father 
was born in Montgomery county in 1825, the son of Henry Caplinger, who 
came to Montgomery county in 1824 from Shelby county, Kentucky. Henry 
Caplinger was a farmer , and teamster, and in those days before the advent of 
railroads hauled produce all over the state, his loads often consisting of dried 
fruits and peaches. He was of Dutch descent, and was a man well adapted 
to the hardships of pioneer days. Clayton Caplinger was a farmer and the 
operator of a saw-mill. He spent an active and energetic life and died in 
Montgomery county in 1889, n ^ s wife following him the same year, passing 
away on October 1st, her seventieth birthday. She was a native of Ohio. 
They were the parents of five children: William H., deceased; James F., a 
farmer of Newmarket, Indiana; John M., deceased; Charles A.; and Martin, 
who died in infancy. Clayton Caplinger was trustee of Scott township for 
six years, and for fourteen years assessor of Montgomery county. He was 
an active member of the Grange. 

Charles A. Caplinger attended the common schools of Montgomery 
county, and later the old Medical College of Indiana. He took up practice 
at Marshall, Indiana, in 1881, and for nineteen years remained there, remov- 
ing, in 1900, to .Wallace, his present location. In 1877 he was married to 
Nancy' Burgess, who bore him three children: Harley M., deceased; Theoph- 
ilus P., who graduated from the Indiana Medical College in the class of 
1907, and is now assisting his father in practice; and Mary Ruby, who mar- 
ried John Ewbank, a teacher in the Veedersburg high school. In 1899 Dr. 

T40) 



626 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

CapUnger was married a second time, to Mrs. Cerinda Michaels, and is the 
father of two children by this marriage, Nellie Pauline and Charles A., jr., 
who are two bright and interesting young people. 

in politics Dr. Caplinger is independent. For some years he has been 
a justice of the peace, and has served faithfully in that capacity in spite of his 
professional duties. Pie is a member of the Parke County, Indiana State and 
American Medical Association. His practice extends over a wide territory 
and keeps him and his son in active employment. Dr. Caplinger is a man 
who takes much interest in the general welfare of the community, and is 
highly public-spirited, while his known integrity, his sound judgment, and 
his position put him in a situation to advise the people of his neighborhood, 
and aid them with the fruits of his experience and his education. He is a 
member of the Disciples church and belongs to the Modern Woodmen of 
America, Knights of Pythias, and the Masons. 



JOHN C. GOODIN. 

Farming offers many rewards to the young man who perseveres in fol- 
lowing it, for though at times unquestionably he must work hard, yet he is at 
most times in the healthful out-of-doors, in surroundings the most conducive 
to happiness and longevity, and he is pre-eminently the most independent in 
his occupation of any man in America to-day. He is his own master, can 
himself order his hours of working, himself manage his work entirely, and 
then the results, whether good or bad, can be ascribed to no one else but him- 
.self. 

One of the well-known and energetic farmers of Jackson township is 
John C. Goodin, who was born in that township on May 27, 1866, the son of 
William and Emmeline (Black) Goodin. His father was a native of Ohio, 
moved at an early date to this county, served his country faithfully in the 
Civil war, and passed from this life when his son John C. was very young. 
He was the father of three children : Florence, who married William Samp- 
son and is living in Crawfordsville ; Thomas who died at the age of three. 
and John C, the subject of this review. 

John C. Goodin was educated in the common schools of Jackson town- 
ship and began farming as soon as he was big enough to work. He now owns 
eighty acres of land, all of which is tillable, on which he farms general!}'' and 



FOUNTAIN, AND WARREN COUNTTF.S, INDIANA. 627 

raises graded stuck. lie lias given the greater portion of his time in the 
working seasons to a threshing machine, for eighteen years having been the 
owner of a machine, and each season threshing a large portion o! the grain 
raised in the township. For live years he lived in Montgomery county, and 
there he began to thresh, lie has a reputation as one of the ablest and most 
energetic threshers in the county. 

On October 28, 1S94, Mr. Goodin was married to Eva Sampson, the 
daughter of Thomas and Susan (Vice) Sampson. Her parents were early 
settlers of Tippecanoe county, Indiana, where her father was a farmer. Her 
father is dead, her mother is living in Crawfordsville. 

In politics Mr. Goodin is a Democrat and an active part)- worker, and 
that he enjoys the respect and confidence of the community is shown by the 
fact that he was elected the trustee of Jackson township in 190S. He is a 
member of the Modern Woodmen of America and of the Masons, having his 
membership in the latter order at Wallace. Mr. Goodin has a good house 
and barn, having erected all the buildings on his farm. He is a man known 
more widely than most residents of the township, popular with all who know 
him, and a wide-awake, up-to-date, energetic and public spirited citizen of 
sterling character. 



HENRY ALDERSON. 

The gentleman whose name introduces this sketch was a progressive 
farmer and stock raiser of Fulton township, Fountain county, and was a 
man who lived a quiet and law-abiding life, which won the respect and good 
will of his neighbors and friends, and, having w : orked hard a'nd been a care- 
ful student of agriculture, he won well merited success along his chosen line 
of endeavor and was at his death the possessor of one of the valuable and up- 
to-date farmsteads in the southwestern part of the county on the picturesque 
Silver Island, where he had a comfortable home and was enjoying life. 

Henry Alderson was born in Vermillion county, Indiana, December 7, 
1852, and died September 5, 1912. He was the son of John S. and Sarah 
(Lunger) Alderson, who were early settlers of Vermillion county, and who 
were the parents of four children, namely: Mary and Harris are both de- 
ceased; Henry, subject of this sketch; and Frank, who is the youngest of the 
family. 

Henry Alderson was reared on the farm and when but a boy he turned 
his attention to farming and made this his life work. He received his educa- 



628 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

tion in the common schools of Fountain county and received a very practical 
education. He worked hard and was economical 'as a young man and in due 
course of time was able to purchase a fine farm of om hundred and seventy 
acres on Silver Island, Fulton township, nearly all of which is tillable, and 
here his family still resides, he having brought his place up to a high state of 
improvement and cultivation. Here he was very successful as a general 
farmer and stock raiser, always keeping a good grade of live stock, and he 
had a good home and substantial outbuildings and all the modern con- 
veniences, all of which he obtained by his own hard work and good manage- 
ment, for he never had much outside help, and he was therefore deserving of 
much credit as a self-made man. 

Mr. Alderson was married in 187c) to Phoebe Ann Hobart, daughter of 
Jeremiah and Elizabeth (Spalding) Ilobart, her parents having been early 
settlers of Fountain county, having come here from Ohio in a clay when the 
country was unimproved and neighbors were Il:\x, and here the}' established 
the future home of the family by hard work, and they were known as ex- 
cellent people. 

Seven children were born to the subject and wife, namely: Harrison, 
who. lives on Silver Island; Benjamin makes his home at Salem, Illinois; 
George was next in order of birth; Elsie married Claude Babb, ami they live 
at Cates, this county; William, Edgar and Russell Lee all live at home. 

Politically, Mr. Alderson was a Republican, but he never held office nor 
was an office seeker. 



COLUMBUS YOUNG. 

It is proper to judge of the success and the status of a mart's life by the 
estimation in which he is held by his fellow citizens. They see him at his 
work, in his family circle, in his church, hear his views on public questions, 
observe the outcome of his code of morals, witness how he conducts himself 
in all the relations of society and civilization and thus become competent to 
judge of his merits and demerits. After a long course of years of such daily 
observation it would be out of the question for his neighbors not to know his 
worth, because, as has been said, "Actions speak louder than words." 
Throughout Fountain county there is nothing heard concerning Columbus 
Young, well known farmer and popular citizen of Fountain township, but 
good words. He has passed his entire life in this locality and therefore his 



they can from the Blue Gra& 


3 slate ti 


when roads were mere trails a 


flld the ( 


Here they began life as true r 


>ioneers 


the first settlers, and in due coi 


irse of t : 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 629 

worth is well known, but it will be of interesl to run over the important events 
of his life in these pages. 

Mr. Young was born in Cain township, this county, August [9, 1847. 
He is the sun of George and Nancy ( Frazier) Young, both parents natives 
of Kentucky where they grew to maturity and were married, and when young 

Fountain county, Indiana, by wagon, 
mntry was wild and sparselj settled. 
.nd endured bravely the hardships of 
ne had a good home. They wen- tin 
parents of two children, Columbus, of this review, and fames Wesley l who 
lives in Jackson township. 

Columbus Young grew to manhood on the home farm and when but a 
boy he knew the meaning of hard work. He received his early education in 
the common schools of the county, and he took up farming for his life work 
when a young man. He has met with encouraging success all along the line 
and has secured a good home, a very productive farm and a competency to 
insure his declining years free from want. He is the owner of one hundred 
and forty-two acres, all tillable land and under an excellent state of improve- 
ment and cultivation. He carries on general farming and stock raising and 
has a pleasant home and good outbuildings, all as a result of his own honest 
and persistent efforts. In October, 1907, he retired from active work and 
is now living at Cates. 

Politically, Mr. Young is a Democrat, and has always been loyal in the 
support of the same. He has been a member of the advisory board in Fulton 
and Jackson townships for the past ten or twelve years. 

Mr. Yoiing was married March 14, 1869, to Allethe Lowe, daughter of 
George and Mary (Gruilliams) Lowe, old settlers of Fountain county. Mrs. 
Young's father was from Kentucky and her mother from Tennessee. They 
came here among the pioneers, -entered land from the government and built 
a cabin in the woods. Mr. Lowe cleared his land and in time had an ex- 
cellent home here. There were no roads here in those days, and wild beasts 
and game were in abundance. It was necessary to safely corral the sheep at 
night to keep the wolves from destroying them. At one time Mr. Lowe made 
a trip on horseback to Rockville, a distance of twenty miles, and carried a 
large kettle home from there, to make maple syrup. 

Two children have been born to Mr. Young and wife. Lawrence, de- 
ceased, and John Wesley, who married Minnie Livengood and is living at 
Cates, this county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Young are well known and have a host of friends, being 
hospitable, jovial and neighborly. 



63O . FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

WILLIAM M. RATCLIFF. 

Among the well-known and influential farmers and stockmen of Mill 
Creek township is William M. Ratcliff, whose farm 1- among the largest in 
the township and without a superior as to productiveness, for its owner is a 
scientific and practical farmer in the best sense of those words, has made his 
farm from the beginning, having cleared it from the woods, has always kept 
up fertility of his soil carefully, and now is the owner of property which 
yiel< - himself a handsome profit and represents a substantial fortune. 

William M. Ratcliff was born in Parke county, Indiana, on February 8, 
1859, the son of Thomas R. and Juliet (Gray) Ratcliff. Thomas R. Ratcliff 
was he son of William Ratcliff and the grandson of Thomas Ratcliff. Will- 
iam Ratcliff was a native of North Carolina, whence he moved to Ohio, then 
to Parke county, Indiana, where he entered land from the government. He 
came through Indianapolis when the city consisted of only a few log houses. 
After the war he moved to Illinois, dying at Danville, that state, at the age 
of eighty-two, having spent an active, useful and respected life. Juliet Gray 
was the daughter of Micajah Gray, who came to Parke county in early days 
from Michigan, and there followed farming until his death, in January, 1875. 

Thomas R. Ratcliff was bom in Parke county in 1834, and spent most 
of his life there. Im early days he operated a saw-mill in Parke county, be- 
fore the railroad was built, and used to buy enormous poplar trees for one 
dollar each. He was also a farmer. Recently he moved to Mission, in 
southern Texas, and there is peacefully spending his later days. Eight chil- 
dren were born of his marriage with Juliet Gray. She died on March 17, 
1875. Thomas R. Ratcliff later married Mary Jenne, who bore to him four 
children, all of whom are living. The entire family were always hardy and 
rugged. 

William M. Ratcliff attended the common schools and took a three- 
months business course at Danville, Illinois. The greater part of his educa- 
tion has been obtained by wide reading. In 1882 he was married to Nannie 
Sowers, the daughter of Solomon and Emmeline (Lindley) Sowers. Her 
father was a native of North Carolina, who moved first to Parke count)', 
Indiana, and later to this county where he died on February 12, 1897, at the 
close of a life spent in farming. Her mother died on May 25, 1885. To 
William M. and Nannie S. Ratcliff four children have been born; Clement E., 
who man ied Carrie McIIargue, a thresher and farmer of Mill Creek town- 
ship; Li hi, at home; Ethel S., who married Stoddard Rector on January 1, 
191 1, an is living at Kingman; Claude, at home. Mrs. Ratcliff passed 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 63I 

away to the great beyond on March 29, 1912, having spent a life of great 
set \ ice to her husband and family. 

Since 1890 Mr. Ratcliff has lived on his present farm, which consists 
of three hundred and twenty acres lying in one tract, while lie owns eight; 
acres one mile farther west. A great portion of this .farm was cleared from 
the woods by his efforts, and he has made all the improvements, including a 
fine house, and excellent and substantial barn. His land is ail well tilled, and 
he has remaining forty acres of timber. His specialty is hog raising and 
feeding, and he feeds more hogs than any man in Mill Creek township, and 
also a good many cattle, shipping his stock to Chicago. He shows no especial 
preference to any one breed of hogs, but raises graded hogs of all kinds. For 
twenty years he was a thresher and followed his machine over a large portion 
of Fountain county, and thus gained a wide acquaintance an ' a reputation as- 
a good thresher and a hustler. In politics he is a Republican, and is now a 
member of the advisory board. He has been urged to run for office, but his 
aspirations are not in that direction and he refuses consistently to accept. He 
is a member of the United Brethren church. 



SHERMAN SILAS STRADER. 

Well' and favorably known as an enterprising farmer and public-spirited 
citizen, with the greater part of his life before him, Sherman S. Strader has 
already gained an honorable standing among his neighbors and fellow citizens 
and fills no inconsiderable place in the agricultural community of his town- 
ship. He is a native of Fountain county, Indiana, and was born on the old. 
Strader homesUad in Shawnee township, February 18, 1879, being a son of 
Daniel and Frances Matilda (Leath) Strader, a notice of whom will be found 
elsewhere in this chapter. In the district school not far from his home he re- 
ceived his preliminary education and later attended for some time the Normal 
School at Veedersburg, where he acquired a knowledge of the higher branches 
of learning and laid the foundation for his subsequent career as an intelligent 
and public-spirited man of affairs. Reared to agricultural pursuits and hav- 
ing a natural liking for the same, he chose it for his vocation and his series of 
successes since beginning life for himself have won for him an influential 
place among the leading farmers of Shawnee township, as his present solid 
financial standing abundantly attests. 

Mr. Strader owns a small though splendid farm and the house which his 



632 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, tNDIANA. 

family occupy is one of the landmarks of Shawnee township, and among the 
oldest private residences in Fountain county, having been erected in the year 
1836. It has been remodeled and improved from time 1.. lime and notwith- 
standing its great age, the house is both comfortable and commodious, and 
with its equipment of modern conveniences ami attractive surroundings, it is 
one of the really beautiful and attractive old homes of this part of the count) v. 

Not only as a tiller of the soil has Mr. Strader been successful and 
forged to the front among his fellow citizens, but he has also been a prime 
factor in the public affairs of his township and a leader in all that tends to its 
material development and progress. He served two years as supervisor, aside 
from which he neither held nor desired office, although his influence has been 
generously exercised in behalf of his friends seeking public honors and pre- 
ferment. In politics he votes with the Republicans and in religion subscribes 
to the plain, simple teachings of the Christian church, holding at the present 
time the position of trustee of Union cemetery near the local church with 
which he is identified. 

Mr. Strader and Anna Olive Barker, daughter of Thomas Barker, were 
united in marriage on the 4th day of October, T905. the marriage being blessed 
with two offspring: Naomi Christine, born September 2<), 1906, and Daniel 
Thomas, whose birth occurred on August 27, 1908. 



JOSEPH STARKEY; 



One of the most active, thoroughgoing and enterprising young farmers 
of Fulton township, Fountain county, Indiana, is the gentleman whose name 
stands at the head of this biographical notice, a man who has progressed in 
his chosen life work because he has been a hard and consistent worker and 
has been self-reliant, no matter in what environment he has been placed, for 
he realized at the outset that the man who depended solely upon his own re- 
sources in his relations with the world, whether in a business or social way, 
was much more likely to a> complish what he set out to do than the man who 
shirks his responsibilities, casting them on the shoulders of others. 

Joseph Starkey, who lives in the town of Cates, but operates a good farm 
nearby, was born in Clark county, Illinois, October iS, 1876, and is the son 
of William and Saphrona (Phipps) Starkey. The father was born in Ohio 
in 1846 and the mother's birth occurred in Indiana in 1854. The latter grew 
to womanhood in her native state, was educated and married here and spent 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 633 

her life within the borders of the state, and her death occurred in Fountain 
county in 1899; William Starker lives at Rob Roy, this county. Lti the early 

days he went to Illinois, where he remained for some time, later returning to 
Indiana and settling in Parke county, and finally settling in Fountain count) 
where he established the permanent home of his Family, which consisted of 
six children. 

Joseph Starkey was educated in the common schools and he received a 
very practical education. He turned his attention to farming when a young 
man and this has continued his life work. He operates a farm of seventy- 
three acres of valuable and productive land, which joins the town of Gates, 
in Fulton township, this county. It is mostly tillable and under an excellent 
state of improvement. He carries on general farming and keeps some good 
graded live stock", which furnish no small portion of his income. He has a 
very coz) lotne in the town of Gates, and from there he operates his farm. 

Mr. Sharkey was marrie on September 5, 1896. to Margaret F. Barker 
Gates, widow of Joseph Gates and daughter of Bryant and Annie (Sowers) 
Barker, both parents being now deceased. Mr. Barker was an early settler 
in this county, and he spent his life engaged in farming, and died here on 
July 2j, 1896. Six children have been bora to Mr. and Mrs. Starkey, three 
sons and three daughters, named as follows: 13. /ry R., William E., Ola 
Fay, Lola M., Hazel X. and Joseph B. 

Politically, Mr. Starkey is a Republicai , but be is not a biased partisan, 
and often is independent in his voting. He is at this writing very acceptably 
discharging the duties of trustee of Fulton township, having been elected to 
this office in 1908. He was formerly assessor of Fountain county for a period 
of four years, filling the office to the satisfaction of all concerned. Fraternally, 
he belongs to Cates Lodge No. 518, Knights of Pythias, also to Camp No. 
8766, Modern Woodmen of America. Religiously, he is a member of the 
United Brethren church. 



HENRY GLASCOCK. 



One of the most prominent men and influential citizens of Mill Creek- 
township, Fountain county, Indiana, is Henry Glascock. Fie is not only a 
prosperous farmer and large land owner, but is vice-president of the Bank of 
Kingman and is looked upon as a man of sound judgment in financial matters. 
He has lived in this district all his life, and has taken a leading part in all 
public movements looking to the increasing good of his community. 



6,34 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

His father, Francis Jackson Glascock, was bom in Egypt, Illinois, on 
June 21, 1821. He was- of a family thai lias left its name well recorded in 
the history of our country, lie was a cousin of that famous character known 
to even- school child in the United States, S me wall Jackson. He purchased 
the land in Mill Creek township from the ob Alexander, who had 

it from the government, when Van Buren was President of the United States. 
He first married Elizabeth Reynolds who was born September 17, 1824, and 
they had two children, Harriet, who lives at Hillsboro, Indiana, and Harris, 
who lives at Sterling, Indiana. She died early, and he married Isabel Moffett, 
who was born on April 14, 1820, in White- Water, Indiana. They had two 
children, Nancy, who died young, and Henry, who was born in Mill Creek 
township, Fountain county, Indiana, March 21, 1856. Henry lived his early 
life on the farm, gaining that intimate acquaintance with nature and learning 
the valuable lessons of life that have made him success fr'. 

On October 17, 1878, Mr. Glascock married Frances O. Cade, daughter 
of Samuel and Eliza J. (Clark) Cade. (For the history of the Cade families 
see the sketch of Mr. Cade, in this work.) His wife died in 1909. They had 
three children : Troy C. married Mary Lindley, September 28, 1904. He is a 
farmer, and a banker at Kingman, being a director of the Bank of Kingman, 
of which his father is vice-president. Mattie Gertrude married R. A. Mc- 
Cord, cashier of the same bank. (See sketch of the McCord family in this 
work.) Samuel Jackson Glascock maried Catherine Van Deventer, grand- 
daughter of Major Irvin, and he and his brother are now helping to run the 
home farm, under the supervision of Mr. Glascock. 

Besides being a banker, Mr. Glascock has always been an extensive stock 
raiser and under his direction his. boys are now handling Duroc Jersey hogs 
with great success. He has made improvements on the old home place con- 
tinually and now has one of the most modern and well equipped farms in the 
county. He is a Democrat and a leader of his party in that part of the 
country. 

Mr. Glascock has now retired from active business and lives on his well 
cultivated acres. But he is still active in mind and spirit and his influence is 
felt in every matter of consequence in the district, and his opinion as a con- 
servative banker is relied upon. He is always ready to give the rising genera- 
tion the benefit of the advice of a man who has grown up with the country, 
encountering and overcoming all the obstructions in his path with sagacious 
foresight and clear-headed action. Mr. Glascock is a member of the Disciples 
church. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 635 

MARVIN T. CASE. 

The subject of this sketch is. in point of continuous service, one of the 
oldest, as well as among the most successful practitioners of medicine in 
Fountain county, and in addition to an honorable professional career he has 1 
military record of which any soldier might well be proud, having served in 
tbe iate Civil Avar and taken part in many of the most noted battles of thai 
historic struggle. Dr. Marvin T. Case is a native of Walworth county, Wis- 
consin, and a son of William H. and Sybil 11. Case, the latter prc\ bus to her 
marriage a Miss Howe. William H. Ca.se was born at Lake George, New 
York, in 1819. Some time in the early forties he went to Wisconsin, where 
he engaged in farming and the manufacture of lumber, which vocations he 
subsequently discontinued and embarked in the mercantile business near the 
town of Delavan, in that state. Disposing of his interests in Wisconsin about 
1847, ae returned to New York, and for some years thereafter devoted his 
attention to dairy farming and the manufacture of cheese, in connection with 
which he also bought and shipped horses and other live stock. In 1856 he 
moved to St. Joseph county, Michigan, where he remained four j'ears and in 
i860" went to St. Clair county, Illinois, from thence, after a brief residence, 
started again to Michigan, but owing to the almost impassable condition of 
the roads, stopped in Warren county, Indiana, where lie resided during the 
ensuing two years, devoting his attention to farming in the meantime. From 
Warren county he moved to St. Joseph count)". Michigan, at the expiration of 
the period indicated, and after living there until 1865, went to Minnesota and 
engaged in the fur trade at the town of Prospect, on Lake Superior, shipping 
thence to Duluth. One season before the opening of navigation, he loaded 
his pelts on an old, dilapidated propeller and started for the latter port, but 
before arriving at his destination, the boat went down, causing him to lose his 
entire stock of furs and very nearly his life, as he was three days afloat on a 
plank and about dead when picked up by a chance vessel and taken to Milwau- 
kee, where he spent the six months following in a hospital. When sufficiently 
recovered, he located in Porter county, Indiana, where he spent two years at 
farming, removing thence to Iowa and latei to Berrien county, Michigan, 
where he followed agriculture until 1884, when he sold out and during the 
two years ensuing lived in Fountain county, Indiana, with his son. the subject 
of this review. At the expiration of that time he returned to Michigan, and 
purchased another farm in Berrien county, on which he resided until his 
death, on October 16, 1909. 



636 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Dr. Marvin T. Case was born June 18, 1843, ;,Ilu spent a pail of his 
early life in hi alive county and a part in the various piaces where his fatln r 
lived during the time the family was almost constantly on the move. 1 J is 
preliminary education, acquired in the public schools, was afterwards supple- 
mented by courses of study in various institutions of a higher grade, from one 
of which he received a literary degree, thus becoming, while still young, quite 
a thorough scholar and well fortified for the profession which he had in view 
for his life work. When the great Civil war broke out, Dr. Case was among 
the ioyal young men of the North to respond to 1 'resident Lincoln's call for 
volunteers and from 1862 until discharged at the cessation of hostilities hi 
nobly sustained the reputation as a brave and gallant defender of the national 
union. Enlisting the former year in Company D, Eighty-sixth Indiana In- 
fantry, he shared with his comrades the vicissitudes of war in a number <>f 
noted campaigns and bloody battles, his regiment forming a pari of the Army 
of the Cumberland and seeing as much active service, perhaps, as any other 
regiment in that command. Among the battles in which he participated were 
the following: Perryvak, Rural Hill, Stone River, where his regiment was 
engaged three days, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, and the assault and capture 
of Missionary Ridge. Following the engagements in and around Chatta- 
nooga, his command was ordered to Knoxvilie, Tennessee, to relieve General 
Burnside, returning later to Chattanooga, where it joined the force under 
General Sherman for the reduction of Atlanta. In the movement against that 
noted Confederate stronghold the Doctor experienced much strenuous service. 
having taken part in the battles of Rocky Face Gap, Resaca, Kingston. 
Adairsville, Dallas, Chattahoochee River, Pine Mountain, where the Confed- 
erate General Polk was killed ; Kenesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek ; the 
siege of Atlanta; Lovejoy Station and Jonesboro, in all of which he bravely 
bore his part as a soldier, whose sole aim was to-do his duty and uphold the 
honor of the country for which he was fighting. 

After the fall of Atlanta, the Doctor's regiment was attached to the 
command sent to watch the Confederate force under General Hood, and dur- 
ing the march to Nashville the enemy were encountered at Columbia, Tennes- 
see, in a two-days' engagement, and at Spring Hill, where there was a running 
fight, but no great loss on either side. Following these were the bloody battles 
of Franklin and Nashville, in the latter of- which the Confederate army was 
defeated and broken, thus virtually ending the war in that part of Tennessee. 
From Nashville, Dr. Case accompanied his regiment to Jonesboro, eastern 
Tennessee, where he remained until mustered out of the service in June, 1865. 
The Doctor gave three of his best years to the defense of the flag and. as al- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 637 

read) ited, the record which he made during that period is replete with dutj 
bravely and faithfully performed and untarnished by the slightest suspicion of 
dishonor. 

At the close of the war. Dr. Case returned to Indiana and during the 
ensuing year worked on a farm in the summer time and attended the schools 
of Williamsport timing the fall of 1865; when sufficiently advanced to pass 
the required examination and obtain a teacher's license, he taught two terms 
of school at Pine Village and one in Williamsport. In 1867 and r868 he 
served as school examiner of Warren county. J laving long before this mani- 
fested a decided predilection for the medical profession, he began the pre- 
liminary study of the same in 1807 under the direction of Dr. Jones, of 
Williamsport, and later entered the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor 
from the medical department of which he was graduated in 1870, having re- 
ceived a literary degree from the same institution prior to that date. While 
prosecuting his medical studies he also took a course in science, doing in two 
years the work that usually requires five, besides teaching chemistry 1 uring 
his last year in the university. 

Upon the completion of his medical education. Dr. Case opened an office 
in Attica, where he has since practiced with gratifying success, being at this 
time the oldest, as well as the best known and among the most efficient and 
popular physicians and surgeons in the city. Since the year indicated, his 
practice has taken a wide range, including a large patronage in the city and 
throughout the county, and not infrequently have patients come from distant 
places to consult him in regard to diseases requiring more than ordinary pro- 
ficiency and skill. lie has always been a student and keeps abreast of the 
times professionally and in touch with the latest improvements and discoveries 
in the domain of medical science. He is a member of the state and county 
medical societies, and during the past twenty-five years has acceptably filled the 
position of health officer in Attica. A number of years ago the Doctor was 
school examiner of Fountain county, and he has always manifested an interest 
in educational matters, having served on the Attica school board, and at the 
present time he is a director of the board, having the management of the public 
library of the city. He was long an influential member and director of the 
Attica Building and. Loan Association, through the agency of which more 
than four hundred thousand dollars were loaned for building purposes without 
the loss of a single dollar to the organization. In his fraternal relations, he 
belongs to the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and for a number of years he has been a leading spirit in Bryant Post, Grand 
Army of the Republic, at Williamsport. For a number of years Dr. Case 



638 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

was United States pension examining surgeon at Attica and in later years a 
member of the board at Covington. He is also a trustee of the Methodisl 
chinch, and a member of the advisory board of Logan township for many 
j ears. 

Dr. Case, in the month of November, 1870, was united in the bonds of 
wedlock to Elizabeth DeMott, daughter of Rev. J. J!, and Emily (Payne) 
DeMott, the father a well known Methodist minister and a man of high stand- 
ing and wide infruei in religious circles. Dr. and Mrs. Case have three 
children : Jessie, an accomplished musician, now in charge of the musical de- 
partment of Tudor Hall at Indianapolis; Clarence, a newspaper man in Chi- 
cago; and Lauren W., also a resident of Chicago, and teller of The Wendell 
State Bank in that city. 



MANFORD 13. BODINE. 

Among the honorable and influential citizens of Fountain county, Indiana, 
is tl e subject of this review, who has here maintained his home all his life, 
winning a definite success by means of the agricultural industry, to which he 
has devoted his attention during the years of an active business life. His 
career has been that of a fair-minded and straightforward man of affairs, and 
thus Mr. Bodine has ever commanded the respect and esteem of his fellow 
men, and he is deserving of a representation in his county's history. 

Ma 1 : ford B. Bodine was born in Wabash township, this county, in 1865, 
and is the son of John and Caroline (Brewer) Bodine. The father was a 
native of Ohio where he spent his childhood years, coming to Fountain county, 
Indiana, in the early days and establishing his permanent home, spending most 
of his time in Wabash township, successfully engaged in general fanning, in 
which pursuit he met with much success and was thus enabled to spend the last 
fifteen years of his life in retirement in a pleasant home in Covington, where 
his death occurred on March 8, 1909. 

Ten children were bom to John Bodine and wife, six of whom are living 
at this writing. 

Manford B. Bodine grew to manhood on the home farm and there he 
worked wdien a boy. He received a very fair practical education in the com- 
mon schools. He farmed on the home place for a period of thirty-three years, 
then purchased a place in Wabash township, five miles from Covington, con- 
sisting of one hundred acres, sixty of which he placed under a fine state of 
cultivation and improvements, and here he has since been successfully engaged 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 639 

in general fanning and stock raising, handling graded stock of a line grade, 
cross between the Poland and Chester White hogs, also Red Tolled and short- 
horn cattle, and his fine stock has always found a very ready market when- 
ever offered for sale. lie also has devoted much attention to raising poultry, 
being a breeder of Ancona chickens, and at this writing lie ha? over eight 
hundred on his place. They arc admired by all who see them and have been 
a source of great profit. He has made a careful study of live stock and 
poultry raising and he is not surpassed in these lines of effort by anyone in 
the county. 

Mr. Bodine was married in 1904 to Gertrude Lewsader. daughter of John 
and Laura (Harris) Lewsader. The father was a resident of Vermillion 
county, where he was killed some time ago on a railroad. Three children have 
been born to the subject and wife, namely: Katie, Lura and Harold, all at 
home with their parents. 

Mr. Bodine is independent in politics, preferring to vote for the best man 
rather than the party. He has never sought public office. He is a self-made 
man and is deserving of much credit for the large success which has been his 
as a result of his indomitable efforts. 



SAMUEL W. WATERMAN. 

The family name of the subject of this sketch is familiar throughout the 
county of Fountain and it has lo tg been as highly esteemed as that of any other 
in this part of the state. It was in honor of the immediate subject of this 
sketch that the village of Waterman received its name, and to him is due the 
credit of attracting attention to the place and making it an important trading 
point for a large and enterprising community. The name Waterman has 
always been a synonym for progress and the several members of the family 
from the early days of the locality's development to the present time have con- 
tributed much to the general development of the various communities of their 
residence and won and retained the respect of all wdio knew them. 

Samuel W. Waterman, a successful farmer and stock raiser of Fulton 
'township, was born in Fountain county, Indiana, April 6, 186S. He is the son 
of Cale W. and Edmonia (McCormick) Waterman. Cale W. Waterman was 
born in Vermillion county, this state, in 1840, and he spent his life principally 
at Silverwood, and was a successful attorney and farmer. He was, for many 
years a justice of the peace and a notary public, and as a public servant he was 



64O FOUNTAIN AND WARBEN >UN TII'.S, INDIANA. 

very popular and was very busj loking after the affairs of his offices, his 

law practice and his farm and h >ecame one of the well known and influen- 
tial men of this section of (lie slate. As noted above, the town of Waterman 
was named for him. His death occurred in 1S9S. His widow is still living, 
making her home in California, with her son. The elder Waterman was a 
stanch Democrat and was a local leader in his part)-, influential in its affairs 
for many years. Fraternally, he belonged to the Free and Accepted Masons. 

Six children were born to Calc W. Waterman and wife, named as follows : 
Juletta. Richard, Samuel W. of this sketch; Charles, who is living in Cali- 
fornia; Mary and Worth. 

Samuel W. Waterman grew to manhood on the home farm and there he 
worked when a boy. He received a good practical education in the common 
schools, and early in life took up farming for a livelihood. He is now the 
owner of a very productive and well improved place consisting of ninety-five 
acres, seventy of which is under cultivation. He carrier on general farming, 
and he lives on the old home place, which he has kept well tilled so that it has 
retained its original fertility. -He has remodeled the buildings, and every- 
thing is well kept. His yard is filled with large, fine old forest trees, and his 
home is a pleasant and attractive one. He has made his own way and secured 
his own competency, having never depended upon any one. 

Mr. Waterman was married in 1897 to Lottie Randolph, da. jhter 
William Randolph, a we'! known family of this county, mention of whom is 
made in oilier parts of this history. Two children have been horn to the sub- 
ject and wife, namely: Ruth and Helen. 

Politically, Mr. Waterman is a Democrat, but has never been especially 
active in public matters. Fraternally, he belongs to the Knights of Pythias 
at Silverwood and the Modern Woodmen of America. 



WILLIAM M. CLOVER. 

This retired farmer and honored citizen is a native of Fountain county, 
Indiana, and the sixth in a family of eight children, whose parents were 
William and Katherine (Walker) Glover, both early settlers of Indiana, mov- 
ing from the eastern part of the state to Fountain county during the pioneer 
period. By occupation William Clover, Sr., was a farmer and stock raiser. 
He located about eight miles north and seven miles west of Yeedersburg, 
where be cleared a farm and in connection with tilling of the soil did a thriv- 
ing business for some years hauling grain, timber and merchandise from 



FOUNTAIN ANI> WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. Oil 

Veedersburg and Lafayetta to Chicago. There being few good roads al thai 
time, he was obliged to use as many as six horses to his wagon and the trip to 
and from his destination frequently required ri.nn a \veel< to a week and a 
half. lie added considerably to his income by means of freighting and in 
due time became quite a well-to-do farmer and widely known citizen whose 
word was considered as sacred as a written obligation. Whili 
clerk at a sale of goods in a tannery he, with about fifty others, was injured 
by the giving way of the floor in which the merchandise was stored, a beam 
pinning him to the earth and breaking his hack, from the effects of which he 
died twenty-four hours after being rescued. This lamentable event occurred 
in the year 1848. 

William Walker, father of Afrs. Glover, moved from eastern Indiana 
to Fountain county in an early day- and settling in the dense woods, addressed 
himself to the formidable task of clearing and developing a farm. This in 
due season he accomplished, and in the course of a few years became one of 
the leading agriculturists in his section of the country, also a citizen of high 
character and wide influence. He devoted his life to the tilling of the 
enjoyed the esteem of a large circle of friends and acquaintances and 
many years ago, leaving to his descendants the heritage of a name a 
which no breath of suspicion was ever uttered. 

William and Katherine Glover had eight children, namely: Elizabeth, de- 
ceased; James, also deceased, married a Miss Furr, and was a farmer by occu- 
pation; Almira. the third in order of birth, is the wife of J. S. Wood; Savan- 
nah married A. M. Ward, who died in the arm] ; Mrs. Pruc'i ne'e Lac] 
ceased; William M., the subject of this review; Mrs. Alary E. LaBaw is the 
widow of a union veteran, who lost his life in the late Civil war; and Indiana, 
the youngest of the number, died some years ago. 

William M. Clover was born in Fountain county on June 15, 1841, and 
grew up to the full measure of manhood amid the bracing air and wholesome 
discipline of country life. At the proper age he was put to work on the farm 
and during the winter seasons in his youth attended school in an old log build- 
ing not far from his home, where lie made substantial progress in the common 
school branches, constituting the course of study. Reared to the pursuit of 
agriculture, he chose that honorable calling for a vocation and followed the 
same in connection with stock raising until his retirement from the farm when 
he purchased a small grocery store in Covington, having rented his farm to 
his son-in-law for a period of five years. At the death of his son-in-law, the 
subject returned to his farm where he continued to reside until retiring from 
active life and moving to Veedersburg, where he has since made Ins home. 

(40 



642 FOX NTAIN Wl> WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Mr. Glover has always been a great lover of the horse, and while engaged 
in farming raised a number of ven fine animals which he disposed of from 
time to time at fanq prices. He a! ' 1 oted considerable time to the thresh 1 
ing of grain, for which he was especially prepared with a splendid separator, 
his reputation in thii line of work being second to thai of no other man in 
the county similarly engaged. Since his retiremenl he lias lived a life d 
quiet and content in Veedersburg, where he is widely known and greatly 
esteemed for his many estimable qualities of manhood and citizenship. On 
the 8th day of January, [863, he was united in marriage with Miss M. E. 
Coffing, whose birth occurred March 21, 1843, ;U! '' whose father, Andrew 
Cofting, was a native of Fountain county and a gentleman of high standing in 
his community. 

Mr. and Mrs. Glover are the parents of nine children, namely: L. 
Burton, who died at the age of ten in mths ; Elmer, whose first wife was Mattie 
Smith, after whose death he married Emma Qttiggle; Delia, wife of William 
Bark ley, lives near Osborne Prairie, where her husband is engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits; Ann married R. A. Crane, a resident of Veedersburg; 
George S., the fifth in order of birth, is noted elsewhere in these pages; Abbie 
M., widow of the late S. Boatman, lives on the farm in Fountain count which 
her husband formerly operated; James Albert married Anna Wolf and is 
engaged in farming near Osborne Prairie; Berle, who married a Miss Quiggle, 
lives in Fountain county, his twin brother, Paul H.. having died in earlv life. 
Mr. Glo cr is a firm believer in revealed religion and for a period of thirty- 
five years has been a deacon in the old Christian church, with which body his 
wife and several of his children are identified. Politically, he gives a 
hearty support to the Republican party and fraternally holds membership 
with the Knights of the Maccabees, at Covington. 



JACOB M. TEEGARDEN. 

Jacob M. Teegarden, the_ gentleman of whom the biographer writes in 
this connection, is widely and favorably known for his success in various lines 
-of activity and the brief record here presented may be studied with profit by 
those whose characters and achievements are still matters of the future. Mr. 
Teegarden was born September 24, 1850, in Fountain county, Indiana, being 
a son of David and Martha (Jarrett) Teegarden, a reference to whom may 
be found in the sketch of J. R. Teegarden on another page of this work. The 



pent on the family ho: 


mestcai 


1 in Wabash 


flit of day, and in the \ 


mblic - 


chools of the 


t <- ication the thru - 


afford 


eel. He was 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 643 

early year.- of the subject were 
township, where lit- first saw the 
neighborhood he obtained the b 
reared to honest toil, grew up with the belief that man should earn his bread 
by the sweat of his face and while still quite young began tilling the soil upon 
his own responsibility which calling he followed with gratifying success until 
his twenty-fourth year, when he engaged in contracting. Mr. Teegarden's first 
effort in the latter line was in getting out lumber for use in railway construc- 
tion and during the five years that he was thus engaged his labors ■/•.ere unite 
extensive and to a marked degree successful. A.1 the expiration of the period 
indicated he married and resume-! the pursuit of agriculture, which he con- 
tinued for some years, the meanwhile clearing and otherwise improving the 
fine farm of one hundred sixty acre- in Davis township, where he now lives 
and adding very materially to hi reputation is an enterprising man of affairs. 
During the past several years he has resiled his farm and given his entire at- 
tention to the breeding and raising of live stock, in which he has achieved 
marked financial success, being also one of the largest buyers and shippers of 
stock in his part of the country. 

Mr. Teegarden has been a very active and industrious man and the ample 
competence now in his possession is the result of his own well directed efforts 
and judicious management. He cleared the greater part of his farm with his 
own hands, cut the road leading to the place of his first dwelling house, 
which he subsequently remodeled and converted into one of the most com- 
modious and attractive homes in the community. It was mainly by his efforts 
and influence that a flag station 011 the Wabash railroad near his place was 
secured and the people in the vicinity have not been slow to recognize and 
appreciate this and other favors obtained through his agency. Mr. Teegarden 
is a Progressive in politics and an ardent admirer of Colonel Roosevelt, whose 
leadership he is glad to acknowledge and in whose behalf he devoted all the 
energy at his command in the recent campaign. He has always taken an active 
interest in political affairs, keeps well versed on questions concerning which 
men and parties are at variance and is ever ready to give a reason for the 
principles he espouses and to defend the soundness of his convictions. In mat- 
ters religious he is a Methodist and a zealous member as well as liberal patron 
of the church and all lines of good work under the auspices of the denomina- 
tion, his wife belonging to the same religious body also. 

Mr. Teegarden's marriage, to which reference is made in a preceding- 
paragraph, was solemnized in 1880 with Savilla Chizum, daughter of Daniel 
and Elizabeth E. (Ewry) Chizum, the father a member of one of the eldest 



64-I FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

pioneer families of Davis township. Mrs. Teegarden's grandfather, Joseph 
Chizum, came to Fountain count}' when the country was a wilderness into 
which few while men had penetrated and was one of the first to enter i ind a id 
settle in what is now the township of Davis. Mr. and Mis. Teegarden have 
had three children, the oldest of whom, a son by the name of Joseph A., is a 
distinguished physician md irgeoi located al Indiana Harbor. In addition 
to an extensive i ati , a i h i E surgeon of the Illinois Steel Com 

pany of Gary, Indiana. Katie, the .-croud in order of birth, who is still with 
her parents, is a professional elocutionist whose services are in great demand 

and her death was a severe Mow to the fond parents. 



MAURICE M. YOUNG. 

Devoting his energies to agriculture and stock raising, Maurice M. Young 
enjoys distinctive prestige among the most enterprising farmers in the county 
of Fountain. He is one of the owners of valuable landed estates in Troy 
township and in point of general improvements, especially in the matter of 
buildings, his place is not excelled by many in this section of the county. Mr. 
Young is one of those courageous men who started out in life with but a lim- 
ited amount of capital. With a liberal endowment of self-reliance, a clear 
brain, a strong- will and a determined purpose, he overcame the many dis- 
couraging circumstances which marked his beginning, removed the numerous 
obstacles from his pathway", gradually forged to the front and in the course 
of time found himself in possession of the desirable property which is his 
today. 

Mr. Young was born in McLean county, Illinois, December 25, 1868. 
He is the son of John William and Mary Jane (Moore) Young, farmii g 
people, natives of Logan county, Kentucky, and Perry county, Ohio, re- 
spectively. The father was unable to enlist as a regular soldier during the 
Civil war, on account of being a cripple, but he was permitted to serve three 
months under his friend. Col. Jonathan Marion. He moved from his native 
state to Illinois in 1851 when the vast prairies there were sparsely settled, 
and he still owns the old homestead which was entered from the government 
by his father, having thus been a resident of that state for a period of sixty- 
one years, and he assisted in transforming the virgin soil into the fine farm 
that it is today. Politically, he is a loyal Republican. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 645 

Four children wore bom to John W. Young and wife, namely: Elmer 
Ewing, Aletha May, Maurice \l. (the subject) and Ernest Adelbert. 

Maurice M. Young grev\ to manhood on the old hi me place in [llinois, 
where In- helped with 1 duties about the farm a- -<<<>n as lie was 

old enough, and lie received, his education in the common schools of his 
native community. Early in life be turned his attention to general farming 
and stock raising and this has continued to he his line of endeavor, and he 
has met with continued success all along the line. He has lived on hi- fine 
farm in Troy township, Fountain county, Indiana, since February, 1906, 
which place o two hundred and forty acres of well cultivated and 

well improved land, on which stand a pleasant home and convenient and 
substantial outbuildings. An excellent grade of live stock of various kinds is 
to be found about the place, and no small portion of his annual income is 
derived from this source. He makes a specialty of Duroc Jersey hogs, which. 
to the superior quality, find a very ready market when offered for sale. 

Mr. Young was married on February 7, 1894, to Edith Blanche Clay- 
pool, a native uf Illinois and the representative of an excellent family. This 
issue has resul :d in the birth of seven children, five of whom are kving, 
namely : Ruby, Elva Elizabeth, Clara May. Blanche Lucile and William Clay- 
pool. Fraternally, Mr. Young is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Modem Woodmen of America. 



W. H. II. STEPHENSON. 

W. FI. H. Stephenson, a retired farmer and old citizen, is a native of 
Fountain county and dates his birth from the 6th day of October, 1830. He 
comes of an old pioneer family that settled in this county as early as 1829, 
moving here from K< ntucky and locating in Logan township, where John 
Stephenson, the subject's father, bought land which he improved and on which 
he lived until his death in the year 1867. Jane Stallcup, wife of John Stephen- 
son and mother of the subject, was of Welsh descent. She died in 1835. leav- 
ing several children. W. II. II. being the youngest of the number and the only 
one now living. In early life John Stephenson was a carpenter, but worked 
little at his trade after settling in this county, all of his time being required in 
the clearing and improving of his farm. When be came here the country was 
new and what is now one of the finest and most prosperous parts of the county 
was an almost unbroken prairie. While opening his farm Mr. Stephenson, 



6_|6 FOl S I . i ■ . \1> W ARREN COl M .1 Mil VNA. 

after working hard all day, would frequentl) spend the greater portion of 
the night splitting rails I if a lantern or the blaze o,l burning 1 >$> 

heaps. He was a man of great industry and energy, but, like mam othi i 
those strenuous times, undermined his strong constitution In excessive toil, 
the ill effects of which he felt in after life 

W. 11. 11. Stephenson spent his childhood and youth on the farm and 
his memory goes back to the time when the country was new and hard work 
the common lot of all. When sufficiently strong to be of service he helped in 
the clearing of the land, splitting- rails* chopping wood, piling brush, rolling 
logs, grubbing and the various other kinds of labor required to remo 
timber and prepare the soil for tillage. During his minority he helped cultivate 
the farm and the meanwhile attended, as opportunities afforded, the indifferent 
schools of the times, the first of which was taught in a small log cabin heated 
by a large fire-place and furnished with benches made from split logs. The 
varied experiences through which he passed taught him to be industrious, 
frugal and self-reliant and on arriving at tin gin making his own 

way in the world he was well prepared for the task before him and resolutely 
addressed himself to its accomplishment. Reared to agricultural pursu 
has devoted his life to the same, and in due time his industry, economy and 
efficient management were duly- rewarded, as the ample competency at his 
command abundantly attests. 

At one time Mr. Stephenson owned a farm of two hundred acres in 
Logan township, all valuable land and well improved, but with advancing age 
he disposed of all but (be eighty-acre tract where he now lives, which is a part 
of the original family homestead. He still occupies the bouse erected by bis 
father in 1S53, but has remodeled the dwelling from time to time and added 
to its capacity , until it is now a substantial and commodious dwelling and 
answers well the purposes which a comfortable home is intended to subserve. 
Having accumulated a sufficiency of this world's wealth to insure an inde- 
pendent and comfortable old age, Mr. Stephenson, in the year 1906, rented 
his farm and retired from active life, since which time he and bis good wife- 
have been living alone in the old home at peace with their fellow men, their 
consciences and their maker. 

Mr. Stephenson was married in 1857 to Alar, ilia Hughes, whose father. 
John Hughes', a shoemaker by/ trade, settled a number of years ago near where 
the subject lives, subsequently removing to Attica, where bis death occurred. 
Three children constitute the family of Mr. and Mrs. Stephenson: John, a 
merchant of Indianapolis; Emma, wife of Frank Hatton, of Attica, and 
Anna, who married Charles Cole, the last named being deceased. Always an 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 647 

industrious, hard working man, Air. Stephenson found little time to devote to 
public matters, nevertheless he has ever been interested in the prosperity of 
his township and county and to the extent of his ability has contributed to 
these ends. Since old enough to exercise the rights of citizenship he has sup- 
ported the Democratic party, but with the exception of serving as sup< 
of Logan township, many years ago, he ha- neither held nor desired ofl 
any kind. Few men have lived to better purposes than he and now, a tb 
shadows lengthen and lie and his faithful companion proceed hand in hand 
toward the twilight and the journey' end, the) carry with them the good will 
and blessing of the large circle ol friends with whom they have so long 
mingled. 



HORACE NEWTON STRADER. 

The vocation of agriculture was ably represented in Shawnee township 
lor a number of years by the enterprising citizen whose name appears a! the 
head of this sketch, belonging to the well known Strader family that have 
long been identified with the material growth and prosperity of Fountain 
county, he was an honor to the name he bore and his part in life was ably and 
faithfully performed. Horace Newton Strader, sou of Daniel and Frances 
M. (Leath) Strader, was born on the old family homestead in Shawnee town- 
ship, September 20, 1872. His educational privileges were such a the istri 
schools afforded and in the more practical school of the fa h ; med those 
lessons of industry, frugality and concentration of purpose which 
well as a foundation for his subsequent career as a successful agriculturist and 
progressive citizen. He early turned hi- attention to husbandry, which he 
followed with gratifying results all of his life, the meanwhile attaining to high 
standing for his many estimable qualities of mind and heart, and for the in- 
fluence for good which he ever exerted among his fellow men: 

Mr. Strader was married on the 12th day of November, 190-', to lsora 
Deliaven, whose parents, Leroy D. and Emma (Barkley) DeHaven, were 
among the well known residents of Van Buren township, the union resulting 
in two children, Leroy Francis, born March 15, 1904, and Emma Lucile, who 
first saw the light of day on December 16, 1906. In his religious belief Mr. 
Strader adhered to the teachings of the Christian church and throughout life 
he was ever animated and cheered by a living faith which proved his stay and 
support in the hours when earth receded and eternity opened to his view. He 
was a member of the Masonic fraternity, the beautiful and sublime principles 



648 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COl NTIES, INDIANA. 

of which he manifested in all of his relations with his fellow men, and at one 
time belonged to the Plymouth Brotherhood, but severed his connection there 
fore his «K ith. His home life was beautiful and eminently 
worthy of imitation, his influence was ever exerted in behalf of th righl as he 
saw and understood the right, and as a Republican he earnestly upheld his 
party, believing its principles and doctrines to be for the b i I interests of (he 
people. He was a good nan and just, and his death, which occurred on Ma) 
19, 1910, while in the prime of his day- and powers, was profoundly lam 
by a large circle of neigh! >rs and friends, not a few of whom felt his taking 
off as a personal loss. 

Since her husband's death, Mrs. Strader has lived on the home farm, con- 
sisting of one hundred and ten acres in Shawnee township, and given personal 
attention to its cultivation and management. She is a woman of excellent 
character, moves in the best social circles of the community and is greatly 
esteemed for her high personal qualities and the gentle influence which she 
exercises for good among those with whom she mingles. Her father, Leroy 
DeHaven, was horn in Troy township, September 17. 1852, and his wife, 
Emma Barkley. was also a native of Fountain county. They are still living 
and make their borne with Mrs. Strader, who is the second of their three chil- 
dren, the others being Arta P., wife of Charles E. Brooks, of Clinton, North 
Dakota, and Catherine, now Mrs. Mahlon Bodine, of Troy township. The 
DeHaven family were Virginians. Jackson DeHaven, .Mrs. Strader's grand- 
father, being the first of th< county, Indiana, to 
which part of the state he moved many years ago. 



PHILIP B. GRUBBS. 

Success has been earned by Philip B. Grubbs by long and hard work' in 
connection with agricultural pursuits and he is now enabled to spend his 
declining years in retirement in his cozy home in the town of Covington, sur- 
rounded by the comforts of life as a result of his earlier years of activity, 
when, for a long period, he was classed as one of Fountain county's energetic 
tillers of the soil and' public-spirited citizens, always ready to do his full share 
in furthering any movement looking to the material or moral welfare of his 
adopted county and thus he won the respect of his neighbors and acquaintan- 
ces, and has always ranked as one of our worthy citizens. 

Mr. Grubbs was born in Dearborn county, Indiana, October 5. 1844. 



lljXl'AIN A Nl» \V 






He is Hi. -m of John M. 


and 


Eliza I 1 i 


been a nati\ e of ■ udiana. 'I 


'he j 


laternal g 


to ilii- state j rom N i 


/ ill 


1832, and 



iger ) < irubb . the father h; n 

■.. ard ( irubb . 
Hi.,' rear entered land in Milli r 
. irl count) . thus being one of the early settl ■ : :re lie 

carved 1 permanent home of the fa primeval forests, and 

there his son. John M. Grubb . father oi tin subject, grew up and. in 
I ; I the majoi pari of his life. He lived in Lowa two turned 

to Dearborn count) He always followed farming and was well and favoi 
known throughout his native county. His death occurred in [856, his 
widow surviving until 1850 

Philip B. Grubbs grew to manhood on the hoi le farm and received his 
education in the common schools. VVhen the Civil war broke out he enlisl 
Company K, Seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, in 1861 ;oon after the 
first call for troops was issued and this was the first regiment to leave the State. 
He served over three years in the Arm) of the Potomac under Rosecrans and 
other distinguished commanders, and was in many of the leading ban! 1 
the great campaign in the East, and according to his comrades he was a most 
faithful and gallant soldier. He was honorably discharged on September 20, 
[864. He fought until nine o'cl :e'ding da^ on the Weldon rail- 

road near Richmond, Virginia 

After his career i, the army Mr. Gruhbs returned to Dearborn county. 
In 1865 he came to Fountain cou ma farm on the Wabash 

river, later purchasing a farm in V\ a ash . fc 1 ivhere he lived for a period 

of thirty-six years, during which time he became one of the leading general 
farmers of this part of the county and enjoyed continuous success. He made 
a specialty of thoroughbred Poland-China hogs, which, owing to their su- 
perior quality, always found a very ready sale. 

Having accumulated a competency through the able management of his 
fine farm, Mr. Grubbs in 1910 moved to Covington and bought an attractive 
modern home in Washington street, the former home of the late Doctor Mock. 
Mr. Grubbs and wife are the owners of a splendid farm of two hundred and 
ten acres of very productive land in Wabash township. 

Mr. Grubbs was married in December, 1866, to Frances Horbart, whose 
death occurred in October, 1867. In 186S the subject was united in marriage 
with Nancy (White) Furgeson, widow of a Union soldier who died in 1862 
while in the army. To Mr. and Mrs. Grubbs have been born four children, 
namely: Lulu M. ; Thomas J., who died when twenty-three years of age; 
Alex is living on the home place, which he operates; Edgar died when eigh 
teen months old. 



65O FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COl . o -. WMANA. 

i husband, Benton Fui g;e on, was 1 irn in Fountain 
>n September [3, 1839. and became a successful farmer in Fulton 
township. On August 30, 1862, he enl Sixty-third Regi- 

ment, : lunteer Infantry, and served with the Army of the S 

lie died during the service. To Benton and born two 

children. Charles V., a referee in bankruptcy, ised. 

Politically, .Mr. Grubbs is a Republican, and he had the horn r of casl 
his first vote for Abraham Lincoln. He has always 
in public affairs, and for six years he served as count; 
ber of John C. Fremont Post No. 4, Grand Army of the Republic. ' 

to the Baptist church and is a liberal supporter Mr. Grubbs 

is deserving of a great deal of credit for what he has accomplished, ha 
started out to work by the month when only thirteen tep bj 

step l'j has forged his way to the front unaided. 



EARL D. ROBISON, 

; noni Foui : best known ci 

the name of Earl D. Robison has long been prom it. actical 

intelligence and rare foresight, he lias been a forci 1 il fact' r ii 
circles of Attica, to the materia! advancement of which city he has conti il 
more perhaps than any of his contemporaries, while in matters of public policy- 
bearing upon the best interests of the community his counsel and advice have 
ever carried weight and influence. A strong mentality, invincible courage 
and a determined individuality have so combined in his make-up as to render 
him a natural leader of men and director of opinion and what he has accom- 
plished in the recent development and progress of his adopted city has gained 
for him a prestige among his fellow citizens Mich as few much older in year- 
attain. 

Mr. Robison is a native of Carroll county, Indiana, born in ,thc city of 
Delphi on August 17 . 1876. His father. Samuel M. Robison, moved from 
near Hamilton, Ohio, to Delphi, a number of years ago and after a resi 
of some years in that time transferred his residence to Fountain count}', where 
he still resides. After attending the public schools until acquiring a knowl- 
edge of the branches taught, he decided to devote his life to business pursuits, 
accordingly, in 1892, while still quite young, he engaged in the gents' furnish- 
ing trade at Attica, which line he has continued ever since, his establishment at 



i ' VXD WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 65 1 

this time being the largest and most extensively patronized of the kind in the 
diligent appli ation and judicious management, together with thosi 
personal qualities \ \ 1 ; ■ in and retain warm friend hip, 

1 lilt up a lucrative trade and his - far bespeaks for him a 

prosperous future and a prominent place nol only in busini 
esteem and confidence of his fellow men as II 

As alreadj indicated, Mr. Robison is public spi 
very largely indebted for the enterp 1 its recenl 

growth has been noted. In tb another, "Hi ne oJ the 

city's most successful 'boosters',*' it being a fact worthy of note thai n 
ment having for its object the material progress of the municipality has been 
undertaken without his advice or leadershi] : hit in es 

tablishing the Merchants' Association in 1004 and four years later he was 
elected secretary 01" the organization, which position h< acceptably 

filled and through the medium of which lie has been instrumental in promot- 
ing the commercial interests of the city and locating various enterprises and 
utilities which have tended greatly to its aterial advancement and 
Not the ; easv of Mr. Robisot A ica was the z 

Ltauqua Vss nbly, which, under his direction at : 
become i nost out ations of the kind in 

a close rival of the one at V. the equal of th sembly in 

It is impossible to estin ate 
the ■ of this important educational mi lans nor expenses hav- 

ing been spared to make it accompli i e in view. 

Sortie lea of the way it has ed may be learned from the fact 

that on the occasion of Mr. Bryan's lecture there were over eight hundred paid 
admissions at the gate in addition to the large number of season ticket- pre- 
viously sold. Mr. Robison deserves great credit for his deep interest in this and 
other enterprises for the intellectual and moral benefit of the public, to say 
nothing of what has been accomplished through his efforts for the city's 
material growth and progress. His life has been a very active and strenuous 
one and. being still a young man in the prime of his physical and mental 
powers, be bids fair to continue in the future as in the past an influential fac- 
tor in the affairs of the community honored by his citizenship. In politics 
lie is a Republican, but not a partisan, although well informed on matter- of 
public import ami abreast of the limes in current thought and events. I r. tet 
nallv, he hold- membership with the Masonic and Pythian orders, being an 
active and influential worker in the lodges of both organizations at Attica. 



\kki:y ool \" 



HORACE GH ^ 





The 


[JO 


[J |] 




fii and en 


the 


headii 


'g 


oi this 


re 




town and 


]'" 


ountain 


Ci 


unity. F< 


van 


cernen 


t « 


if the ! 




vn and al 



name furnishe 
I introduction to the [)ei [)le of New 
r mam \ ears id iterial ad- 

rays taking an active part in proi 
welfare of the public, he lias risen to a high place in business circles and has 
long held distinctive prestige ; one of the county's progressive men of af- 
fair Paternally, he is descended from an old Pennsylvania famil; . in 
state his grandfather, Daniel Gray, was born and reared. This an ■ 
early day migrated to Michigan, where he worked for some years as a 
mason, and it was there that he spent the remainde of his life. Among the 
children of Daniel Gray was a son, William A!., whose birth occurred in 
Pennsylvania in 1821, and who when a young man married Sarah Persing, 
who was born in 1827 in the same state. 

By occupation William M. Gray was a carpenter. He early displayed 
unusual mechanical skill and while still a mere youth earned Mich a re] 
tion at his trade thai there was always a great demand for his services. In 
1852 he moved to Fountain county, Indiana, and located at Newtown, where 
he soon became the leading mechanic in the town tding country 

and where there are still many buildings, dwellings, barns, business hous< - 
and public edifices which bear witness to his efficiency and skill. He was the 
first carpenter in this part of the country who could build a winding stairway 
and for many years he had little competition in work requiring a high degree 
of mechanical art, as many specimens of his handicraft abundantly attest. 

Politically, he was an influential Republican and ever manifested a lively 
interest in the success of his party and he also kept in touch with the terms on 
all matters of local and public import. His name appears as a charter mem- 
ber of Newtown Lodge No. 205, Free and Accepted Masons, and in religion 
he subscribed to the Presbyterian creed, having been a zealous and consistent 
communicant of the church in Newtown until his death, which occurred in 
1908. Mrs. Gray departed this life in 1888. She was a woman of excellent 
character, popular in the social and religious circles of Newtown and left to 
mourn her loss a husband and five children, to say nothing of the man)' fi iencls 
by whom she was so greatly esteemed. The following are the names of the 
children of William M. and Sarah Gray: John H. ; Horace, of this review; 
Clara, wife of Thomas Shultz, a retired farmer; Edith, who married Charles 
Kerr, and Mrs. Mabel Ogle, all honored residents of Newtown. 



FOUNTAIN AND \\ ARUE: CO DIANA. 

Flora m the 13th day of \ugust, 1851, 

:arc(J under the |)arental 1 I complel ing the puh 

lie school course pursued 1 year al the Waveband Acad 

vt ith the object in new of entering V 

educati 

reading, both Of w hich he ] o uning in due 

one oi th* m >s1 intelligent and best : 

During his youth he worked at carpentry under his fatln 
after becomi a1 the trade followed the same during the 

and summer seasons for a period of five years, devoting the winter months to 
teaching in the public schoi Is. At the expiration of the time indicated he pur- 
chased a wagon-making and repair shop in Newtow iperated with 
gratifying success for some years, when he discontinued this line of \v< >rl 
started a hardware store, the firsi i nt of the kind in the town. Mr. 
Gray commenced the lattei a large ; k and within 
a short time built up quite a lucrative business, which he o ith en- 
ding Financial results be sold out to F 
the present proprietor. Si : disposi ' ay has 
devoted his attentions to the organizing and pi ■• a number of enter- 
prises and utilities of a pu in a F \vl h he has manifested ability 
oi igh on : id an inten >1 in the material progress of his t< 

him in the front ranks of the county's public benefactors and represent- 
He was the controlling spirit in organizing the telephone system 
of Newtown and making it answi >e for which intended, also 

the lead in establishing the building and loan association and was the prime 
mover in founding the Newtown Bank, of which institution he has been presi- 
dent ever since its organization in the year 1904. He has filled all the offices 
in the telephone system and for some time past has been the efficient manager 
of the same, besides holding various positions in the loan association, the suc- 
cess of which is largely due to his oversight and judicious business methods. 
By reference to the enterprises with which he is identified it will at once seem 
that the subject has been and is still a very busy man. He has done much for 
the material advancement of the community and at the same time has not be< n 
unmindful of his own interests, as his solid financial standing abundantly in- 
dicates, 

Mr. Gray possesses sound judgment, keen discernment in matters if 1 
ness and his various enterprises have been uniformly successful. In addition 
to his interests in Newtown he owns a valuable tract of land in Richland town- 



654 

of two huucln ' i acres, which he I< ases, alth 

He is om "i thi 

inbei of Km 
; attli an I . ir breed of hogs, 

i if his farm hi n sparing eith 
time 01 ge sums in drainage, ferl i 
buildings, and it is needless to state that there arc fev 
Fountain county than the o 
Mr. (,1'ay has not only been interested in promoting his own affairs and 
tiie welfare of the community, but for many years he ha 
factor in political that ; I oca leral, 1 eing one oi the lea* 
Republicans of the county and a ji i the council of hi 
He has served two terms as a member of the county council, the first by ap- 
pointment, the second by election, and discharged : ] . n in 

the same careful business-like manner that he manifests in his own affairs. 
In his religious faith he is a devout member of ' e Presbyterian church, in 
which for a number of years he has held the ofl of elder; in his fraternal 
relations he belongs to Newtown Lodge No. 4 
town, which he helped organize. 

Mr. Gray, in the yea ■ • ■ 

daughter of James and Pho (Dag he union resulting 

birth of four children, nam : J I wife oi i!. 

V. Witt: Willa J., a teacher in the Hillsboro high school, and Daniel B., a 
student of Wabash Colle] tvho will complete ed I onal course in the 
year 1913. Ail of Mr. Gray's children are well educated, being high school 
graduates and of much more than ordinary culture. 



DR. JOHN T. RICE. 



In the present review is briefly sketched the life work of one who is now 
among the oldest residents of Fountain county, and certainly one of its oldest 
physicians, both in point of years and length of service. For more than 
years Dr. John T. Rice has followed the practice of his profession in this 
county, entering upon it after a valuable experience gained in the armies of 
the country and the city hospitals, and during that time he has been ever faith- 
ful to the great trust which mankind bestows upon the physician, the healer of 
diseases, than whose there is no greater responsibility. 



FOUNTAIN VND VVARR O ' [DIANA. 

John T. Rice was born in Waveland, r_\ county, Indiana, in 

[833, tl I Man 

Pennsylvania, near the old Rice fort, and, as a young man, moved to K 
tucky, where he was married, then lal 

1 
lifetime, fie was the fatb r of nine n 11. J., a ph} ckville, 

Indiana, Jane. James, William; Margaret, Th ■ ■ , Alex; fohn T., and 

Robert, who died in in fane.) I a< Rice wa an earn God fearing man, a 
citizen I -.racier, and a true I 

practice in his every action the tenets of his religion. For n years he was 

an elder in [he Presbyterian church. In politics he was .1 v\ 

John T. Rice received h hools and the 

Waveland Academy, and after graduating from the latter followed the path 
so common to ambitious country boys, and'taught school F01 1 Few terms, after 
which he went to Rockville and studied i h his brother, Dr. H. J. 

Rice, and began to practice at Ala , , then went to \\ est 

Lebanon, where he remained for about six months. I 1 862 he enlisti d 
Seventy-second Indiana Volunteer Infantry, which -. 

the Cumberland, and went to Kentucky, wl el to the 

Sixtieth Indiana a-, hospital steward. captured at 

Murhfoi Isville, Kei tucl ivas parol ' ■' went to Branden- 

burg, whence he lal After his discharge from the 

army he went to ] 1 die, ad there a 

hospital until the consolidation of the two hospitals. He then removed I" 
ville, Illinois, and began practicing again, but after I iths returned 

to Rockville and formed a partnership with his brother. H. J. Rice. On 
March 29, 1867, he came to Attica and opened practice there, which became 
very wide, and which extended over a period of forty-two years, until his re- 
tirement in 1909. During sixteen years of this time he was surgeon for the 
Wabash railroad. His professional career was such as to gain for him the 
esteem and confidence of other members of his profession and to command 
the admiration of his patients. 

On September 27, 1866, Dr. Rice was married to Loania E. Brown, the 
daughter of Friend and Minerva Brown, who were early settlers near Rose- 
dale, Parke county, Indiana. To this union were born four children ; Clara 
M., who married Claude Howard, a jeweler of Frankfort, Indiana; Friend 
Thomas, of Long Beach, California; Victoria, the wife of L. E. Baker, of 
Fort Wayne, Indiana, and Leyman Thompson, wdio died in infancy. In 
politics. Dr. Rice is a Democrat, though he has not been very active, but all 



6 5 6 



■ ■■ ' 1 1 . i 



his ward in the cit\ of Utica, in which capacity his ictions were always 

charactei ized by his zeal for the g ! of the c nunil; lie is a member of 

the Methodist church. Dr pen life than an al 

lolled to many of us, and he can Iool< back over them with the realization that 
i, like all men, he has ma I i and would, if hi could 

changi i ■ thii ha< been filled with useful work, and 

such that 1 i r i I the assurance that he can leave to posterity no in] 
better th hi i et in living. 



tohna: wilt 



One o\' the fascinating features of the farming' industry is the oppor- 
tunity it affords for indr : experiment. ly till 
the soil in rai ing the crops, but he ran 
certain lines and thus broaden his own knowledge b] in this 
way contribute to the knowledge and advancement in sue! Is. We 
make mention in this connection of the name of J ill I \ ' ilt, a life-long 
resident of Fountain county. He has not onl) farmed but has 
attention to the raising of line hoi >es, giving this subjei t much thou 
study. As a result h : has beci i 

is a rei - b irity on the v. us phases of the ndustry and 
best known and succe - torsei i i rn Indiana, owning at this writ- 

ing some of the finest horses of the famed Wabash valley. He is one of the 
most representative citizens of his count) in every respect, an industrious, 
public-spirited, honorable gentleman who has the interest of his county at 
heart. He is a plain, straightforward, unassuming man who merits the high 
respect in which he is universally held. 

Mr. Wilt was born in Jackson township, Fountain county, Indiana, Feb- 
ruary 23, 1871. He is a son of David and Salina (Bailey) Wilt, natives of 
Pennsylvania and Fountain county, Indiana, respectively. David Will came 
to Montgomery county. Indiana, with his parents when he was seven years 
of age, subsequently moving to Jackson township, Fountain county, where 
he learned the blacksmith's trade, which he followed through life, having 
been located in the village of Hillsboro for a period of thirty years, during 
which time he was known as the most skilled blacksmith of this 
the state and his services were in great demand. His death occurred in 1908, 



fOUNTAIN AM) W.WKl i INDIAN \. 



'0/ 



at the age of sixty-three years. His widow still resides in tt 
became the p childiei si ■ ol w hi mi are still livii 

dealer of Hillsboro; John \., subject oi tl Harrv 

and Charles, both of i lillsb >ro . Kate, who marrii ; I lin \\ a 
married Frank Small; a twin oi Susan died unnamed; i mil a 
ceased; Ott is deceased; the two youngest, twii 

David Will was a veteran of the Civil war. having served his 
faithfully as a member of the Sixteenth Indian Vol ii i Infantry. Politi- 
cally, he was a Demo 

Ji hi A. Wilt, of this sketch, i ihood in Hillsboro and re- 

ceived his education in the public schools there, and he has always lived in 
that town. He first clerked in ds store, then went 

into business for himself, operating a grocery, drj goods store and a butcher 
shop, enjoying a large trade in all these lines with the surrounding country. 
Having always been fond of horses and by nature an excellent jud 
he abandoned mercantile pursuits and since 1897 has been han- 

dling horses, dealing in and breeding fine draft horses fi > en the 

lsI horses, his stock 
ti • he was the owner of the fastest stallion in Fountain county, "Leland 
( toward," with a record of 2 :04J H ' Leland \V.," with a 

of 2:131,1, and "Lela W.." witl I 2:15^. He has 1 la 

which he built especially for his needs and which is equipped with every mod- 
ern appliance for the successful handling of his excelleirl stock whicl 
carried his name ail over this part of the country and brings him in 
annual income. Fie employs about his ham about twelve men all the year. 

John A. Wilt was married on October 20, [894, to Susie Napier, daugh- 
ter of James Napier, a well known citizen of Covington, and to this union 
one child has been born, James Napier David Wilt, who assists his father 
with his stock. 

The subject is the owner of a well improved and productive farm of 
one hundred and thirty-eight acres in Fountain county, and he also owns a 
valuable tract of four hundred acres of land in the state of Arkansas. He 
has been very successful in a business waj and. is one of the substantial men 
of this part of the county. Fraternally, he is a thirty-second-degree Mason, 
was form rly a member of the Knights of Pythias, the Knights of the Mac 
cabees, and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Elza Isaiah Wilt, brother of the immediate subject of this sketch, was 
born in Jackson township, Fountain county. January 8, 1867. He grew up 
in the village of Hillsboro and there received his education in the con 

(42) " 



658 CAIN AND WARR1 1 tND 

schools. Early in life he began le under his 

father, and lie became quite 1 roficii 1 n he 

endeavor for a period of twelve ye hen he cn- 

d in the hardware an 
1 1 r Jam 1 ! 11 of Will X I 

ontinued the 

■ >ry about Hillsbon it 
and up-to-date stock of hardware, farmii iols and all 1 . 

Elza I. Wilt was married of 

ington, Indiana. Politically, he is a Democrat and, frat< mall 
of the Knights of Pythias. Like his brothi :■ ' i Wilt, he is widely 

known in this part of the state and is popular with a vasl circle of friends. 



WILLIAM \ 

Ever)- human being either 
Ids an influence whi hers, [f 

t and su ssl ul in his i h >sen field of em ion v\ '' ! 

brig . int th way along which others n 

I i nseque ritical stud; . reo ird of thi 

whose name forms the caption of this bi beneficial i 

:ad< r, foi il has been one of u< i and for the discou 

youth standing ''where m ■• k and the river of life" it abounds in 

both lesson and incentive. Through his own indomitable energy, perseverance, 
sound judgment and honesty Mr. Wright has gradually ascended the ladder 
until he is today one of the leading business men of the section of the Hoosier 
state of which this volume treats, and is a public-spirited citizen who has done 
much for Fountain count}-. 

William A. Wright, owner of extensive telephone and other interests, 
who maintains his home near the town of Hillsboro, was born in Richland 
township, Fountain county, March 29, 1852, and is the son of Thomas and 
Martha (Rohrer) Wright. The father was born on the Atlantic ocean while 
his parents were emigrating from Ireland to America, and the mother, who 
was the second wife of Thomas Wright, was a native of the stale of Mary- 
land. Thomas Wright was a weaver by trade. He came to Fountain county 
in 1840 and located in Richland township, where he bought land and followed 
farming in connection with weaving. Lis death occurred in rSS?, at the age 



COUNT] r-', IND1 \\ \. 659 

ity-i .' >v Mir, i\ ec! a nnml ei • 1 years, dying in 18 

ai the age of sevent} four years. Thomas was the fathei o1 the following 
children: Ezra, who > a farmer in Warren county, died at tin- ai 
eight) two ye; id lives in Nebraska; William A., ol thi 

il. Miller, of California. 'I he last four 1 

,- first man iage 
with a Miss Snyder. Tl 
Christian 1 Derm icrat. 

William A. Wrighl on tl home J trm in Richland 1 I 

in his community In- received a good education in die common - 

- a course in the State Normal Schi 1 at Ten I Fe for 

himself by t< ■ inters and farming during the sumi 

for a number of years, until he gi ■■■' tart. Later he ti 

to the teleph '"I has been .< il in this line of endeavor. 

He is the owner of the Hillsbori 

in the Waynestown Telephone Company, both of which he has built up 
to splendid systems ana ha, made them very p tments. lie is also 

heavily interested in the Iiillsboro Mate Bank, and hi ble and finely 

improved farni of nearly three hu n fact, 

in the county. 

Mr. Wright is a. Democrat and has long taken an active and influential 
part in local political affairs. He has been coi or, county commis- 

sioner and trustee of Richland township, discharging the duties of the<e posi- 
tions in a manner that reflected much credit upon himself and to the eminent 
satisfaction of the people. Fraternally, he is a Mason, and he is a trustee of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, to which he is a large contributor, also con- 
tributes to the support of the Christian church. 

Mr. Wright was married to Bina Neal, daughter of John Neal, a well 
known citizen of Richland township, Fountain county. Five children have 
been born to the subject and wife, namely: Leory, Thomas (deceased), Beu- 
lah, Martha and Alice. 



JESSE E. Fl NK. 



A great essay written long ago said that "When one has given tin' 1 
that is in him to a work, he experiences a feeling of satisfaction." W 
this statement may seem rather broad, yet a greater truth than tin'.', was m 
spoken. Whether one is successful or not in what one undertakes, if he real 



G6o pi il .. CAIN AND WAKE CO , IND1 \NA. 

thai nothing on his pai ha been lefi undone, he hould have nu 

tean that the unsua e m fe< 

as the suco j V ; 

ippy. To this'class belongs Jesse E. l"~unk, une of 
most noi the: n part ol Eoun tin 

county, for he has always done his to 

Mr. Funk was bom m ! mty, Indiana, J 

_' i, 1867, the scion of two of the promii 

Hoosier state. He is a son of Hiram an 11k, both born 

a 1 reared in Davis township also Great-grandfal ei Funk ..<> a native o I 
Germany, from whi n ca n an earh da} and settled 

nmtain county, Indiana, where he pent the rest of hi life, being a i 
pioneer here, and from thai remote daj to this the I ;ell and 

favorably known in the region oi the fa aternal 

grandfather of the subject, was uccessfu man he early 

history of the count}-. He had a famil) of four children by his I 
two children by his secoi still living. Three children wen 

to Hiram and Mary A. Funk, namely: . ivho married James 

lor, of Davis township, this county; Emma C. married Alfred Carlsi 
of Davis township ; a ie youngest. 

The father oi :hildren was a Den 1 is active 

in count} affairs for several years. He was cotintj oner for two 

terms, and he also served three terms a ilso townshi] 

assessor for one term. As a public serv; minent satisfaction to all 

concerned and was well known throughout the county. Hiram Funk and wife 
are both still living, now making their home at Lafayette, Indiana. 

Jesse Marvin, the maternal grandfather of the subject, was also active 
and influential in political affairs, and in 1881 he represented Fountain county 
in the state Legislature for one term, during which he won the hearty approval 
of his constituents and his name will go down in the history of the stale as (he 
man who caused the passing of the railroad fence bill. lie was a stanch 
Democrat. 

Jesse E. Funk grew to manhood and was educated in Fountain county 
and here he has spent his life. On April 16, 1890, he was united in marriage 
with Hattie Bradley, daughter of Robert and Alary Catherine (Riser) Brad- 
ley, who . - .- 1 1 11 fn>;n 1 >hio to this county among the early settlers. Grandfather 
Louis Riser was a soldier in the Civil war, in the Union army. Three chil- 
dren have been horn to Mr. and Mrs. Funk, namely: Robert, Louise and 
Myron, all at home. 



F0UN1 

M Funk is tin ner inc fan i, con: istin<i of two linn I 

ed land, well locale 

township 

ing and nner. H< 

has a pleasant home in the midsl 

Frati ■ to Free 

.... ■ ■ , 

■ 1 1 : , 

crat and. - jenitors, is active in puhlic affairs. He has been 

trustee of ] term, being still 






The life portrayed : merican, 

who, with an inheritance of a sound body and clear mind, earl) began to make 
his own way, little \r\ now has 

ached a.comfo le 3 et a youni 

Mark O. Smith was rn in Berrien c 'unty, Michig 1 
1865, the son oi Samuel and Serena A. Smith. Samuel Smith 

was born in New jersey and 1 liana. In 1861, he 

gan and located in Berrien county, where he followed farming and lumber- 
ing. At times he operated as many as twenty-four teams, in lumbering. He 
died at Waynetown in 1888, aged fifty-eight. His wife had preceded him in 
1884, at the age of fifty-one, passing away in Butler county, Missouri. They 
were the parents of six children, of whom Mark O. is the only one living. 

In the schools of Troy. Berrien county, Michigan, Mark O. Smith re- 
ceived his education. He worked on his father's farm for a while, then at 
the age of nineteen he left home and came to Fountain county, Indiana, to 
visit his grandparents, James and Margaret Marquess, who were early settlers 
of Shawnee township, having moved from their native stat< of Virginia to 
Ohio, and thence to Indiana in the thirties. Shortly after his arrival in Foun- 
tain county bis grandparents died, and he remained on the farm • >rking for 
his uncle, George M. Marquess, for seven years, then for fifteen months 
worked for L. E. Jones at Rob Roy. By this time he had saved a little money 
and he began renting at Rob Roy, operating a part of the Orr farm f ir four 



662 OUNTA) I ] 

years. Thei aci in proved it, 

and renti d land, and now 

he is the ownei ol two hun red a i till; L)L and , i L n 

' >n ! 'ebru ir) [1,1893 vir - larried to [ulna Mc< lean, Lin 

daughter of Jacob ani 

tain county. this m; 1 

- J 
in 190J Smith 1 I [ of SI 

I 

held ari 

n stration of township affah 
been much to the satisfaction of all. Fraternally, Mr. Smith is a meml 
the Modern Woodmen of America at Rob Roy and l 

Attica. 






and not the drone wl 
the toiler in an) community 1 1 1 n : rks con 

to imp rove his o w n estat* 

makes the district in which hi ess and gi 

stantial and highl) . I Fo in c [ames A. Glover, 

w ho ha - I has handled all circumsl u 

obstacles which he has had to overcome with courage and determination. 

James A. Glover was born in Troy township, Fountain county, on June 
[3, [880, the son of William M. and Alary Elizabeth (Coffing) Glover. (For 
the history of his family, see the sketches of William M. Glover and George 
S. (1 over in this work.) He spent his early life on a farm, learning the stern 
lessons which nature teaches to those who work constantly with her. lie re- 
ceived his early education in Troy township, and afterwards attended the 
Indiana Normal at Covington, Indiana. 

Mr. Glover taught .school one term, and then, not being content 
teaching as an occupation, turned his attention to farming and has remained 
on the farm since that time. On October 9, [901, he mai ried Anna ( ). \\ ollV. 
daughter of Nathan and Alary Louise ( Hull) Wolfe, who was 1. »ra" Januarj 
31, 1NN1. in Champaign county, Ohio. When she was a small child her par- 
ents left Ohio and moved to Indiana, locating in Troy township, Fountain 



66j 
countj . w liere Lhcj have farmed 

[ames A. and Anna O. i I 

Edna Ber I fames / Ibert are 

living. )i i ■■■■ 

i iglll : ! 

Mr. ( llo\ er !; all of \\ liich, 

v iih thi ce'ption is, is in a high 

Glo is a typical Indiai 
i md a good i 
trict, form the backbone of this country, and it is upon them thai tl iarj 
portion of thi p ry br< ad the life of 

the nation woul suffe ml e ucb ivi rk> 

the county in which they live would b< lem 

tory of Fountain county would ie sadly [a< 
James A. Glover. 



Now that thi 
age have com ovei 

has been well ing in good to those whom il 

comforl to himself, I 
keeping busy md at the same time in i his neighbor: 

an lives not to himself 
alone." As a result of this commendable attitude he has always been held in 
high esteem 1a I have come into contact with him. 

James F. Marksbury, a successful farmer of the vicinity of Mellott, 
Richland township, Fountain county, Indiana, was born in Kentucky in 1840, 
the son of Daniel and Louisa (Wilson) Marksbury, both parents natives of 
Kentucky. They grew to maturity, were educated and married in the Blue 
Grass state and there they remained until in May, 1863, when they removed 
to Fountain count)', Indiana, ; sd settled in Van Buren township, establishing 
the permanent home of the family there, in which they spent the remaining 
years of their lives. Then became the parents of six children, named in ordei 
of birth as follows: Joshua lives in California; James I\, the immediate sub- 
ject of this sketch: Elizabeth married George Neal, of Mellott; Ellen mar- 
ried Franklin Osborne and thr\ live in California; Join; Samuel, Joseph D. 
and Nancy are all deceased. 



664 

Jam ■ 

i 

ful farm 
. n bine. 

. 
g ite, daug 

. 1 1 ; :;: i been 1 Indiana. 

he of whom arc 
this writing. 

teaching i 

. i< Republican, bul he 

iias n« :■' been i Ider. 



ALIA 

In the history of Foui t] inter- 

ests, the nan - 

through sever; ' 
of the vicinii vi persever pro 

have 
a I lirected effort, and he is today 

one of the substantial and representative men of his community. And while 
he has benefited himself and community in a material way, he has also been 
an influential advocate of good roads, public improvements in general, better 
schools and, in fact, whatever goes toward improving the political and moral 
tone of the co nty. 

Mr. Schermerhorn was born in Fountain county, Indiana, November 9, 
[852. IK i: : tin: son of Jacob and Martha (Odell) Schermerhorn, die mother 
having been the daughter of Major John Odell, who served with distinction 
in the war of 1812, being one of the oldest settlers of the state, and for whom 
Odell's Corners was named. Her grandfather. James B. Odell, traced his 
ancestors back to the year 1600, when they came to America from Great Brit- 
ian and locate 1 at New Amsterdam, now New York City. 

The father of the subject came to Fountain county in 1847 and taught 
school at Odell's Corners, having been only seventeen years old when he 




MR. AND MRS. ALLEX C. SCI I KltM V.K I |OU 



FOUNTAIN AND WA1 

came here; from 1848 in [849 lie taugfil al B< ' hip: from 

from 1850 
1] I 

: three 
hundred 

rs1 « ife, 

ly: Allen C, of this rt\ iew, an I fo 

elder Schermerhi irn 

named as follows: e< I when fourli Vlanha Lied i 

age of elevei illiam 

at Attica. 

Allen 
received a good education u Septem- 

ber 15, 1875, to Rhoda E. Martin, dau 

harry ) Martin. He [829, 

and her mot ntgomery 

were the parents of seven children, nan 

the second child died in i lives in Richland ti 

county; [da M. married James 

young; Jesse M. is preside Nfatioual Bank at Atl larried 

David Gardni I to ■■ !i - ■■ ■■ 

To the subject and wife two children Lura 

married Steven Randolph, a gi • E-. mar- 

ried Ethel VanGebhart, and is a farmer of Richland toi county. 

Allen C. Schermerhorn has managed vv< I - success 

in the world's affairs. At one time he owned seven hundn 1 acres of valuable 
land, part of which was in South Dakota, but he has divided his land and now 
has five hundred and forty acres left, two hundred and twenty of which lies 
in Richland township, Fountain count)-. He has always kept his land under 
a high state of improvement and cultivation and has been except ionall; 
cessful as a general farmer and stock raiser. Having accumulated a hand- 
some competency, he retired from active life in 1909, moved to Newtown ai d 
purchased a beautiful residence, which he has remodeled a ed it one 

of the finest homes in the eastern part of the county. He rebuilt all the build- 
ings on his farm and brought it up to date in evi t, im hiding fencing, 
ditching and obtaining modern labor-saving machinery. Hi 
to his original holdings, 

Fraternally, Mr. Schermerhorn bel gs to Masonic Lodge No. 
Newtown. In religious matters he belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church. 



! • O i ' , 



fl II] R :' 



farmer a 

i 1895. 

tin's life in. tin J 

follows : Samuel ai n I 

1 
man] 
years as a justice oi th< pi 

and always coinman He was a :e; 

Mason and a Democrat in politics, and roved 

an obliging nei 
better by his 1 nee. 

John R. Bn nvn, to 
here respectfully in 

and received [disci] 

■ farm. At the proper a; 

nstitut- 
of study, and during the spring and summer months 
bore his part in the cultivation of the crops and either labor whieli falls to the 
lot of country boys. He early decided to become a tiller of the soil, and to this 
honorable vocation he has since devoted bis energies, adding to his original 
thirty-live acres of the family homestead until he now owns a sin. ill but highly 
improved farm of sixty acres, which, in point of productiveness, is not sur- 
passed by any HI • area of land in Richland township, lie makes a careful 
stud)' of the soils and their adaptability to the various crops grown in this par 
of the state and bj judii tion and the free use of fertili :ers seldi in, if 

ever, fails to re; ize abundant returns from the time and lal n 1 ■ 
his fields. 1 le has also achieved enviable repute as a raiser of live sto ; 
spceial attention to graded cattle and the finei breed.- of swine, from the sale 
of which he adds greatly to bis profits. 

Mr. Brown was married in 1896 to Hattie Simpson daughtei 



I 
>yl the f 

I i 
| 

' ' I mbli 






: this skei' ' ; 

11 and 
laid by a compete:!' 

in his rented home in the pleasant tow 
I for hi; declining ; 

1 the Line and fought the enemie 

i< >n threatened the d F the na ! he for : 

ber of reasons he is entitled to represental 

William Carter was 'horn in Orange county, 
hie is 1 

years in Orange county, 
countyj in 1^51 . and settled on a farm 
. where 'lie death of J 

■ and Ins w ife v. ere 

natives of North Carolina, from which state they came to Indiana when 

in Orange c unty. They became the parents of twelve 

children, all now deceased lint three, William, of this sketch; Mary, who lives 

at Bloomingdale, Indiana, and Cemyra, who lives at Russiaville, tin 

William Carter grew to manhood on the home farm and he helped ivith 
the genera] work about the place when a boy and received his education in th< 
common schools. He was fifteen years old when the family moved to thi 
county. When the Civil war came on he enlisted, in July, 1863, in G m 
C, One Hundred and Sixteenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, ami saw con- 
siderable hard service in the Army of the Tennessee, under Gen< ral 
later under General Wilcox. He participated in a number of engagements, in- 
cluding Walker's Ford. His record as a soldier was a verv creditable te and 



668 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

he was honorablj discharge md mustered out of service in February, [864, 
at Lafayette, Indiana. 

After his absence in the army, Mr. Carter returned home and re 
■ which he made his life work. He is the 
valuable and well improved land in 

... . : 

191 1. 

Mr. Carter was man ied in ! "■ hi ua \ - [863 to fa 
daughter of Joshua B. and 1 among the 

ttlers here. This union resull >irth of seven children : Charles, 

Joseph lives near Kingman. Indiana; Elizabeth married Jan 
son, of Da ville, Illinois; Mary Etta, h< wife of Charles Day; 

. I Ellen, who married William Wilkh 1 I ; two died in infancy. 

Mr. Carter was married a second tim 
alliance on November 28, 1879, with Sarah Ann Huff, daughter of John and 
Jane (Jackson) Huff. Thi; family came to Crawford count}', Indiana, in 
1853. John Huff's family consi Led of ten children, even of ivhorn are living, 
hildren were born t wife: Myrtle, who 

married Daniel Hutchins, lives 
Lena Pearl is decea 

Politically, Mr. Carter is a Republican. Bapti 

church, and was deacon in the same for a period of thirty > 
wars been a faithful church worl 



CH RI STO PI IER 11 E N RY ( 1 JE MENT. 

The subject of this sketch has long been identified with the progress and 
advancement of this favored section of the great Hoosier state, where he has 
maintained his home for more than the Psalmist's allotted three score and ten 
years, having been born within the borders of Fountain count}', and here he 
has spent his long, useful and active life, and has attained gratifying si 
in connection with the development of the natural resources of tins locality, 
being one of the representative farmers and stock raisers of Richland town- 
ship and having one of the most productive landed estates in this part of the 
county. 

Christopher Henry Clement was born in Richland township, Fountain 
county, Indiana, December 6, 1837, and is a son of John F. and Laura 



FOUNTAIN AND \\ \k;;i..\ CO! NTIES, LNDJ 

(Beman) Clement, both natives of the state of N T ew York. The father came 
to Fountain county, [ndiana, October jo, 1828, ami settled near Wingate, later 
m< vc(\ to Richland township, where he devoted the rest ol his life to i 
farming, his death occurring in [857; Ins widow- survived Forty- four years 
longer, passing away in [91 1 1 ige of ninety-seven year* I 

were the pari children, namely : Harriet, Oscar, Wiai la, all 

deceased; Christopher !!., of tin- review, being the youngest. 

John F. Clei W 1 ; i g in early life, but joined the Rep 

in 1850. lie entered land from the government, which he cleared, then 
moved to the farm now owned by his son, the subject, on September 20 [837, 
dying here twenty years later, after developing an excellent farm. He was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Christopher H. Clement, of this sketch, grew to manhood on the home 
farm, where he worked hard when a boy and he receh tl such educati 
the old-time schools afforded, lie was married in [865 to Martha White- 
hall, daughter of Alexander Whitehall and , vi 10 came from North 
hna to Fountain county, Indiana, in T832 and settled a mile and i 
west of Newtown. They became the parents of eight children. 

Two children were born to the 
Grace, who is at home, and Mary, who married Claude C. McCauley, an 
is also at home at this writing. 

Mr. Clement married Alice V. Clark, daughter of Andrew Jackson Clark 
and Sibbie Ann (Robinson) Clark, he born near Lexington, Kentucky, July 
8. 18.15, and the mother was born in Fleming county, Kentucky, in 1824. 
They grew up and married in their native state and came to Indiana in an 
early day, settling in Montgomery county, near Waveland, where they spent 
the rest of their lives, dying there, the death of Air. Clark occurring on Au- 
gust 29, 188S, and the date of Mrs. Clark's death was February 8, 1886. They 
were the parents ol" nine children, namely: Elizabeth died when twenty years 
old; Rev. Wesley F. lives at Lafayette. Indiana; Nanny Ellen lives in Val- 
paraiso, Indiana; .Mice V., wife of Mr. Clement, of this sketch; Samuel lives 
at Valparaiso; Shelby lives in South Bend, Indiana; Carrie lives in Attica, 
Fountain county; Joseph lives in Indianapolis; Mary May died when twenty 
years old. 

Mr.. Clement has remained on the home farm which he has kept well 
improved and has made a pronounced success as a general farmer and stock 
raiser. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and he is highly 
respected by all who know him. 



The 


prominence 


who has 








of characl. 


dut] repo 


sed iii In) n i 


and repre 


sentative se 


and most 


highly e'slc 


; he g6i d 


name of th< 



6/0 FOON rAIN AND WARREN COI I'll 1 

CHARLES I). KERR. 

mat; of < 'harles 1 >. Kerr, of Newtown, 

■ 1 as one oi our leading agi i ultui i ts, is the Iegiti- 
every relation of life liis ex- 
the . : '■]<.• mannei in which he has discharged e\ < ry 
hi n an em ial le i an enterprising 

le man. lie is the descendant of one of tl 
families of this locality and he has striven to keep 
: untarnished with sui ■ years Me is the sun 

of Samuel and Virginia (Dagger) Kerr, full mentio i of whom is made in the 
fketch of John Dagger, appearing in this volume, hence need not he repro 
duced here, except to say that the father of the subject was horn in Butler 
county, Ohio, from which state he came to Fountain county, Indiana, when p. 
Imy with his grandfather, Josiah Kerr, who too!; up government land, and was 
one of the early settlers. Here Samuel Kerr grew to manhood and was mar- 
ried and here he devoted his life to agricultural pursuits, Ins death ■ 
in 1007, and his wife passed away in 1892. Their family consisted of four 
children, namely: Charles D.. of this review; William, who has remained in 
his native state; Carrie married Ed. Milligan, and they live at Waveland; 
Guy lives on the oid home farm in Richland township. 

Charles D. Kerr was reared to manhood on the old homestead and there 
he worked when a boy, attending the common district schools during the win- 
ter months, and early in life he turned his attention to general farming, which 
he has continued to the present time, with most gratifying results. He has man- 
aged well and applied himself closely to his individual affairs, with the result 
that he has prospered, laid by a competency to insure ease and comfort in his 
old age and now finds himself the possessor of a fine, productive farm of five 
hundred acres of valuable land, eighty acres of which lies in Montgomery 
county, just across the line to the east. It is all tillable and has been placed 
under splendid improvements in every respect. The subject's son-in-law runs 
the farm, Mr. Kerr having moved to his pleasant residence in Newtown, in 
October, J909, buying an attractive and neatly furnished home there. While 
on the farm he kept large numbers of various kinds of live stock and derived a 
large portion of his annual income from the same. 

Mr. Kerr was married on September 30, 1S79, to Edith Cray, daughter 
of an excellent old family of this count)', extensive mention of whom is made 
on other pages oi this volume. Two children have been born to the subject 



FOUNTAIN iNl 

and wife: Malic! i arrie, who rec< ed a good musical education and who 
nusii for some time, married Carl yuiggle, and they live on the sub- 
ject's Farm; John : i writing is a student at Wabash 
College, l ' ■, where he i I graduate 
with the class of [913. 

Politii lly, I a Repti tics. Fraternal! ,', hi 

to Masonic Lod al New b i\vn, id he is a cha leml er of the 

Knights of Pythias. He is deserving of a great deal of ere n in he has 
accomplished, having h lance. 



JOHN B. BROWN. 

B a life of pc -sistent and well applied industn . led along the most honor- 
able lines, the gentleman whose name ve has justly e; rned the 
right to he represented in a work of the character of the one at : 1 ■■'.. ' 
with the other men of Fountain county who have nade then 
in their respective communities. He has descended from a sterling pi ieei 
family, many of whose sterling tr? ts he seems to have inherited, for he is nol 
only a man of good character and public spirit but is also industrious and is 
never appalled by obstacles, such as are commonly met along the highway of 
life by everyone. 

John B. Brown, farmer, of Richland township, was born in Fountain 
county, Indiana, April 24, [855, and he is a son of Oliver and Cassandra 
( Reed) Brown. The father was horn in Pennsylvania, from which state he 
moved to Ohio in early life, later coming on to Fountain county, Indiana, 
settling in Jackson township, coming here with his parents in an early day. 
William Brown, the paternal grandfather of the subject, entered land from 
the government in Jackson township, and this he developed by hard w rk and 
close application, literally hewing out a home from the dense forests with 
which this country was covered in those days, and here he spent the rest of 
his life, dying on the home place. 

Oliver Brown, father of the subject, grew to manhood in this county. 
received what education he could in the old-time schools and here he devoted 
his life to farming, having a good farm in Jackson township, where his death 
occurred a number of years ago. He was a Democrat in politics, but he held 
no office, being a quiet home man. 

Seven children were horn to Oliver Brown and wife, all of whom are 



(>J2 FOUN ! \l N AND WARR] D] \NA. 

living at this writing, namely: George, who lives al Wallace. Fountain 
county; imin Riley and Lhey live in Richland township; 

Joseph Newton lives in Ohio; John 13. is i resiclenl uf Richland i 

Benjamin lh cs in P I ta married Ji ;eph I I art ley, of 

ra - Pi rdsvilk : Dora I Hive lives at Danville, Illinois. 

John B. Brown, of this sketch, g 1 on tl 

he worked there very diligeriti) when a boy and young man. fie re 
primary education in the common rural ichool ' his community Ue tui 
up farming foralife 1 irk nd is he has followed successfullj l< the present 
time, beinj . cellent and well improved place of one hun 

dred and thirty-eight ai e Richland township, Fountain county, n 
a neat home and ; outbuildings, in connection with geuer; 

ing he handles m | In tock. 

Mr. Brown was married - [879 to En 1 H ■■'• laughter of J in 
and Afar} 1 (Ham) Horn. Th ifc sp< I their earlier years 

from which state they came ti Nio itg uner n 1 fndiana, in a p 
day and (here established the family home, in that count) th grandparents 
of Mrs. Brown were al 

that section of the state. Fivi children have been born to the subject and 
wife, Deadie, v ig loyd married a Mi ; Foxworthy and 

Lhey live in Richland towi • tomer is at home, as are also Eva and 

Walter. 

Politically, Mr. Brown is a Democrat, but has held no office. He be 
longs to the New-Light Christian church. He is a sell in and is 

deserving of his splendid success as an agriculturist. 



DULY P. FRAZIER. 



When he gazes over his broad acres of well cultivated land the subject 
of this biographical review is justified in feeling" that he has achieved the 
acme of his ambition, when in his early life he became imbued with a deter- 
mination to some day take front rank among the agriculturists of Fountain 
county. That Duly P. Frazier, formerly a well known hardware merchant 
at Hillsboro, but now farming in Cain township, is a popular man and stands 
high in the estimation of the people is attested by the fact that he has been 
incumbent of the office of trustee of his township for over four years, having 
discharged the duties thereof to the eminent satisfaction of the people. 

Mr. Frazier was horn in Cain township. Fountain county, Indiana, April 
5, 1871. He is the son of William and Mary Ann (VanGundy) Frazier, 



the Fraziers to ci 


jrne ti 


j this cb 


and little 


improv 


eitient 


s had be 


the pare* 


ts of th 


- foil. 


nving eh 


siah lives 


m Cain 


town 


ship; Re 


George is 


decease 


d; An 


-.tin lives 


of Denve 


r, Coloi 


ado; 


Albert i: 


deceased ; 


Estella 


marr 


ied Levi 


g'' C, a 


farmer 


of Ca 


.in town- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 673 

natives of Fountain count)', each representing fine old pioneer families of 
fanning i eople, which has been the chief occupation of the Fraziers here for a 
half century or mere. The paternal grandfather of the subject, the fir I of 

count}-, settled here when the country < 

tde, William I'razier and wife became 
: David lues in Boulder, Colorado; Jo- 
is farming in Tazewell county, Illinois; 
is Angeles; Druzilla married John Doty, 
it Benton county, Indiana; Eli is 
ied Levi Livengood, a farmer of Cain township; Vir- 
ip, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in 
this work; Duly P., of this sketch, was the eleventh and youngest of the chil- 
dren. 

The father of the above named children was a Republican, and he lie- 
longed to the Masonic order. His death occurred in 1893, at the age of 
seventy-three years, his widow surviving until J 895, dying at the age of 
seventy-two. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Duly P. Frazier grew to maturity on the home farm in Cain township 
and there he worked when a boy, attending the rural schools during- the win- 
ter months. lie took up farming for a livelihood when a young man and 
soon had a good start and he continued in that line of endeavor until 1907, 
when he engaged in the hardware business in Hillsboro, in partnership with 
J. J. Williams, under the firm name of -Williams & Frazier, for two years, 
and they built up a good trade with the town and surrounding country, but 
not finding mercantile pursuits as nearly satisfactory to his temperament as 
agricultural pursuits, Mr. Frazier sold out his interest and has since been 
engaged in general farming and stock raising. lie is the owner of two 
hundred acres in Cain township, all under a high state of cultivation, and 
which he has placed under modern and high grade improvements, and he has 
a good home and convenient outbuildings, and always handles some good live 
stock. 

Mr. Frazier was married on October 21, 1895, to Gertrude C. Edwards, 
and two children have been born to them, Ruth Marie and Harold L. Politi- 
cally, Mr. Frazier is a Republican, and he has taken considerable interest in 
the affairs of his party for some time. He has been trustee of Cain township 
for the past four years and is still incumbent of that office. Fraternally, he 
is a Mason, and a member of the Knights of Pythias, and he b ngs to the 
Christian church, being a deacon in the same and active in the affairs of the 
church. 
(43) 



6/4 FOUNTAIN AM) WARREN Col'N"! ll'.S, INDIANA. 

EDWIN J. KIRKPATRICK. 

Whether interested in farming or no) one could not look over the finely 
improved and beautifully located farmstead of Edwin J. Kirkpatrick, of 
Richland township, Fi untain coi nty, without experiencing a glow of delighl 
and expressing his pleasure and satisfaction, for everything denotes a scientific 
application of the- world's oldest art, husbandry, everything showing thai a 
gentleman of thrill, industry, good judgment and excellent taste has this 
desirable farm in hand, and a sight like this not onl\ gives the spectator 
pleasure, but is very apt to inspire in him a desire to imitate Mr. Kirkpatrick 
in his work, if he be a farmer, and if not, to do well whatever he has in hand. 

Edwin j. Kirkpatrick was born in Tippecanoe county, Indiana, August 
12, 1853. He is the son of Franklin and Helen (Smith) Kirkpatrick. the 
father from Ohio and the mother from Xew York. Franklin Kirkpatrick 
came to India ia as early as i8j8 and settled in Montgomery county. The 
mother came to this section of the Hoosier state four years later, in 1832. 
These parents began housekeeping in Coal Creek township, Montgomery 
county, later removed to Tippecanoe county, but subsequently returned to 
Montgomery county where they spent their lives engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits and .where they both died. The father of the subject was twice mar- 
ried, one child, Edwin J., subject of this sketch, being born of the first union. 
His second wife was Celia Hay ward, by whom two children were born, 
namely: Frank H. Kirkpatrick, who lives in Denver, Colorado, and Alice E. 
Kirkpatrick, of Indianapolis. 

Edwin J. Kirkpatrick grew to manhood on the home farm and when but 
a boy he assisted his father in the general work about the place, and he 
received his early education in the common schools, later taking a course in 
DePauw University, at Greencastle, Indiana, where he spent two years. Re- 
turning home he took up farming for his life work and is still actively engaged, 
having been very successful as a general farmer and stock raiser. He is the 
owner of one of the best farms in Richland township, his place containing 
four hundred and twenty acres, all well improved and under a high state of 
cultivation. He has an excellent residence and good outbuildings, and a 
splendid grade of live stock is to be seen about his barns and fields at all seasons 
of the year. 

Mr. Kirkpatrick was married in 1S80 to Ida M. Martin, daughter of 
John and Ellen (Maharry) Martin, an excellent family of this county, a com- 
plete sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. Six children have been 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, [NDIANA. 675 

born to Ihe subject and wife, namely: Frank M. lives in Montgomery 
county; John M., a graduate of ['urdue University, at Lafayette, Indiana, 
lives ai home; James, an attornej .11 Detroit, Michigan; George M . 
R. and Ruth E. are at home. 

Politically, Mr. Kirkpatrick is a Republican, and while he has ever taken 
a very deep interest in local public affair^ he has never held office. He is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Absalom Kirkpatrick. grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was a 
native of Scotland and the pos i nany of the sterling traits of the peo- 
ple of that country. He grew up in his native land, and it is related of him 
that once when he was out in the fields at wank he went to his house for a 
drink of water, and while there a representative of the Church of England 
took one of his horses out of his team fi ir taxes. This caused him to emigrate 
to America and here lie spent the rest of his li e. lie married Elizabeth 
Van Pelt, who was born in Nova Scotia, from which countrj she emigrated to 
Ohio when young in years. In [828 the paternal grandparents of the subject 
moved with their sun, Franklin Kirkpatrick, fathi r of the subject, to Indiana, 
and settled in Montgomery county, and there they spent the balance of their 
lives. They became the parents of the following children: John, Samuel, 
Hiram, Rachael, Quin and Franklin, all now- deceased. The Kirkpatricks 
have always been noted for their thrift and rugged honesty. 



FRED S. PURNELL 



Fred S. Purnell, attorney and counsellor at law, is a native of Fountain 
county, Indiana, and was born in Mill Creek township on October 25, 1882. 
His father, Samuel J. Purnell, also of Indiana birth, was an early settler of 
Fountain county and for some years sold goods at Steam Corners, from which 
place he subsequently removed to Veedersburg, where he is still engaged in 
the mercantile business. The maiden name of Mrs. Samuel J. Purnell was 
Odessa Furr. Like her husband, she too is one of the early settlers of this 
county and is still living, being the mother of three children, namely: Fred 
of this review; Myrtle and Helen, the daughters unmarried and members of 
the home circle. 

The early educational privileges of Fred S. Purnell were such as the pub- 
lic school system afforded and in no sense meager. After a preliminary train- 
ing in the district school he attended the Veedersburg high school, completing 



676 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

the prescribed course, folluwing which he entered the State University, where 
he pursued his studies for a period of five years, being graduated from that 
institution in 1904. Eie taughl school one year in the high school at Sterling, 
Indiana. Actuated by a laudable desire to enter tin- legal profession, Air. 
Purnell, alter procuring hi-, degree, spent one year in the office of Crane & 
McCabe, well known att"' n oi 1 1 iwfordsville, Indiana, and th 
in the practice at Veedersburg where lie remained until [906. 

Desiring a larger and more renumerative field in vvl legal 

knowledge he removed the latter year to Attica, where he lias established a 
lucrative practice and forged rapidly to the front among the rising mei 
of the Fountain county bar. 

Mr. Purnell commenced the practice of his profession in a field Ion: 
for its high order of legal talent and for a while his pi ogress, like that o\ il 
majority of young attorneys, was somewhat retarded by the fact indicated 
and divers other obstacles which in due time he successfully surmounted. 
From the beginning of his professional career, his aim has been to acquire a 
sound and critical knowledge of the law coupled with the ability to present 
and maintain the correctness of his opinions; and as a consequence his prac- 
tice has been more than ordinarily successful, as is indicated by the large vo 
time of business which he now commands both as counsellor and befon 
and juries. He has been identified with a number of important cases in his 
own and other counties, stands high in the confidence and esteem of his pro- 
fessional brethren and the general public and, being ill in the prime of life 
with a laudable ambition to excel in bis chosen calling, it is safe to predict for 
him a career of great usefulness and honor. 

Mr. Purnell is a Republican in politics and, like most professional men, 
he manifests an abiding interest in public and political matters, being well 
versed on the leading questions and issues of the times and a zealous advocate 
of the principles which he believes to be for the best interests of the people. 
He has held no office, but has used his influence in behalf of others seeking 
public preferment and to his efforts his party is largely indebted for its suc- 
cess in a number of campaigns. Fraternally, he holds membership with the 
Masonic brotherhood, belonging to the lodge in Attica, and he is also identi- 
fied with the Knights of Pythias and order of Elks, in both of which he has 
been honored with important official positions. 

The domestic chapter in the history of Mr. Purnell dates from the year 
1907, when he was united in marriage to Elizabeth Shoaf, daughter of Dr. p. 
A. and Jennie (Inlow) Shoaf, the union being blessed with one child, a son, 
who bears the name of Samuel F. Purnell. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, 'INDIANA. 677 

HARRY C. MARTIN. 

Everyone is interested in the man who duo things, lii everj com- 
munity one may pick our certain men who have been active all of their lives 
along many lines, and one usually finds that such men, who have been ener- 
getic in their own behalf, have done a great deal for the public at large, either 
directly or indirectly. One of the men who stands out as prominent in the 
affairs of Attica, Indiana, is Harry C. Martin, who has been postmaster there 
for a number of years. His father, James Martin, was a native of Butler 
county, Ohio, and his mother of Parke count}-. Indiana.. They moved to 
Fountain county in 1852, and located at Attica, where he engaged in the grain 
and lumber business. The)' lived there for forty-five years, while he built 
up his business to a tine state of prosperity. He was a Republican postmaster 
in Attica, and was looked upon as one of the most influential men in his com- 
munity, tie was of the faith of the Presbyterian church. In 1807 he died. 
at the age of seventy-one, and his widow is still living in Attica. They had 
four children: L. G. Martin is in the insurance business in Attica; Pied V. 
Martin died in 1904; J. R. Martin is a traveling salesman, making his head- 
quarters in Greencastle, Indiana, and Han) C. 

Harry C. Martin, in whom we are now interested, was horn Octobei 25, 
1853, in Attica, Indiana. He went to the common schools and high school in 
Attica, and then, desiring further advance along educational lines that he 
might be more efficient in his work, he entered the preparatory department of 
the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor. Prom there he went to Wabash 
College, Crawfordsville, Indiana, graduating from there in 1878. For about 
two years he was employed as clerk in a railroad office and mercantile pur- 
suits. He then turned his attention to the newspaper business, where there is 
such a field for a bright and energetic young man, and was associated with Mr. 
Albert S. Peacock in publishing the Attica Ledger for about five years. The 
next ten years Mr. Martin spent in the lumber business, in which he was 
actively interested until he accepted the position of county treasurer in 1895. 
After having filled this position with credit to himself and community, he 
entered into the contracting and lumber business again, and has not only been 
very prosperous, but has taken charge of extensive improvements in his home 
city that are a lasting good for Attica, giving especial attention to street im- 
provements. On June 6, 1888, he was married to Miss Josephine Gardner, 
daughter of A. J. and Mary Gardner, Indianapolis, Indiana. In 1906 his 
prominence and reliability in public work was again manifested in his appoint- 
ment to the office of postmaster, which he has retained since that time. 



678 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Mr. Martin is a member of the Presbyterian church, and is a Mason. ] [e 
is also a Scottish Rite Mason and through the maternal line a member of the 
Sons of the Revolution. He is a Republican, and has filled his position as 
postmaster with credit to himself and his party. Mr. Martin is a leader in 
his community, and is a public spirited man. as is shown by his activities 
manifested especially in matters pertaining to the public schools and public 
library work. He has been zealous in all his public duties, and is regarded 
as one of the men who have done the most to make Attica grow, lie is the 
kind of man of whom the Hoosier state is proud— a man active in all that 
means growth and progress, and who gives of his life and energies freely in 
the promotion of public welfare. 



ELMES e. goats. 



The life of the subject of this sketch has been such as to bear aloft the 
high standard which was maintained by his father and grandfather, the latter 
having been one of the earliest settlers in this part of the Hoosier state, and 
his life was signally noble, upright: and useful, one over which fell no shadow 
of wrong in thought, word or deed. Such was the type of men who laid the 
foundation and aided in the development of this state, and to their memories 
will ever be paid a tribute of reverence and gratitude by those who have profi- 
ted by their well directed endeavors and appreciated the lessons of their li es. 

Joseph Coats, the paternal grandfather of the subject, was a native of 
Loudoun county, Virginia. His parents moved to Lancaster, Kentucky, 
when he was three years old, where they owned a tract of land and operated 
a "still house." Joseph Coats came to Fountain county, Indiana, in 1827 and 
entered land from the government, about two and one-half miles southeast of 
Veedersburg, and there he began in typical pioneer fashion, enduring the hard- 
ships and trials incident to such a venture in those days, but he persevered and 
succeeded, and there spent the rest of his life engaged in general farming, and 
he became an influential man in the early history of the count)-. His death 
occurred in 1877, at the age of seventy-four years. He married Serena U. 
White, daughter of Capt. William White, a well known man here in his day. 
He came from Tennessee in 1823, when this country was a wilderness, in- 
deed, and he had the honor of building the first grist mill in Fountain county. 
Joseph Coats took the first census of Fountain county. He took a prominent 
part in public affairs, was influential and a potent factor in the early public 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 6/9 

life of this locality, and he served as a representative in the state Legislature, 
also as probate judge, lie was a Republican. As a public servant, he gave 
the utmost satisfaction in every respect, lie had but one child. William B. 
Coats, father of the immediate subject of this sketch. The death of Mrs. 
Joseph Coats occurred in 1906 at the ripe old age of ninety-seven years. 

\\ illiam B, Coats, mentioned above, grew up on his father's farm and 
he was educated in the country schools and at Wabash College. Crawfords- 
ville, Indiana, lie took up fanning for a livelihood early in life and followed 
the same until his death with a large degree of success, becoming one of the 
substantial and influential men of his community, fie married Elizabeth 
Lucas, daughter of Joseph Lucas, an early settler of Fountain county, who 
started a general store in Chambersburg in J S30. To William B. Coals and 
wife were born the following children: Laurel, who married Leroy Clore, 
of Crawfordsville; Frank is a farmer: Elmer E., subject of this sketch, Dora, 
now deceased, was the wife of Joseph Sims; Charles is a farmer and lives at 
Veedersburg, Indiana: Joseph L. was next in order; Emma and Edna are 
both deceased. 

William B. Coats was a Republican, and he was for two terms county 
commissioner. He was a member of the Christian church. His death oc- 
curred in 1897, at the age of sixty-seven years. His widow is still living, 
making her home in Veedersburg. 

Elmer E. Coats was born in Fountain county, Indiana, and here he grew 
to manhood on the home farm and received his education in the common 
schools of Veedersburg and at Ladoga. He took up farming for a livelihood 
and has been very successful as a general farmer and stock man, being a good 
manager and a persistent worker, so that he has accumulated a competency. 
He has made a specialty of raising fine horses, and owing to the superior 
quality of his live stock they always find a very ready market. He is the 
owner of a fine and well improved farm of four hundred and twenty acres in 
Parke and Fountain counties, and he has a commodious and attractive resi- 
dence and large, convenient outbuildings. All of his land is under cultivation 
and modernly improved. 

Mr. Coats has traveled extensively, having been around the world, and, 
being by nature a keen observer and a man of versatile talent, he talks most 
interestingly of his sojourns in foreign lands. Politically, he is a Republican 
and, while he takes no special interest in public matters, is influential in a local 
way. Personally, he is a man of genial address, excellent manners, makes 
one feel at home and it is a pleasure to know him. 



680 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

CHRISTOPHER BRANT. 

The life of Christopher Brant, the venerable ami extensive fanner of 
Cain township. Fountain county, has been such as to bear aloft the high 
standard which was maintained by his father and his uncle, who were early 
residents of this section of the Hoosier state. The subject himself came down 
to us from the pioneer period, having spent must of his long and useful life 
in this locality, and during the seventy-eight years that have come and gone 
since his advent in this community he has seen wondrous changes, has seen 
the "wilderness blossom as the rose" and he has taken a leading part in the 
progress of his community, so that, for many reasons he is eminently entitled 
to a conspicuous place in the history of his county. 

Mr. Brant was born in Shelby county, Kentucky, October 26, 1827, and 
he spent his early boyhood in the Blue Grass state, coming with his parents, 
John and Susan Brant, to Fountain county, Indiana, when he was seven 
years of age, and here he grew to manhood and received his early education 
in the old-time schools. His father purchased one hundred and sixty acres 
of land upon his arrival here, and this he improved into a good farm and 
devoted the rest of his life to general farming. His family consisted of ten 
children, only two of whom are living at this writing, Christopher, of this 
review, and Catherine, who married a Mr. Blackford and lives at Wayne- 
town, Indiana. 

Christopher Brant has devoted his life to farming. He talks interestingly 
of the times when he came here and found a wilderness, and how he helped 
clear the land and assisted in getting the family located in their permanent 
home; also of the Indian days, how, eight years before he and his parents 
came, his uncle and aunt had braved the wilds of Fountain county, finding 
Indians camped on the land now owned by the subject. He has a great many 
interesting Indian relics, picked up on his farm. He has prospered as a 
general farmer and stock raiser until he is today one of the substantial and 
leading agriculturists of the county, owning a well improved and valuable 
farm of nearly one thousand acres in Fountain county, also three hundred 
and twenty acres of fine land in Oklahoma. 

Mr. Brant first married Harriet Thompson, who died in 1859. One 
child was born to them, Jeanette, who married Matthias Beaver, who is now 
deceased. Mr. Brant was married second, May 20, 1866, to Mary Jane 
Campbell, whose parents came from Ohio in an early day. She was one of 
four children, namely: Wallace Campbell, Mrs. Elizabeth Chapman. Airs. 
Sabina Epperson and Mrs. Brant. She was born January 6, 1841, at Rynear, 







MR. AND MRS. 



IER 15RANT. 



FOUNTAIN VND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 68] 

Fountain county, and here she grew lo womanhood and received her educa- 
lion. 

Politically, Mr. Brant is a Democrat, and he has been s pervisoi of roai 
work. Fraternally, he is a Mason, and he endeavors to carry die sublime pre- 
cepts f this time-hon >red order into his every-da) life, consequently he i< 
admired and esteemed by a wide circle of friends and acquaintances. Per 
sonally, he- is a genial, hospitable and whole-souled gentleman whom ii is : 
delight to know. His record as a business man and citizen is without blem- 
ish and no man in the county is mure deserving of trust and honor. 



MARK B. BRINEY 



it is hard for the present generation to properly appreciate the brave 
deeds of the "boys in blue." who sacrificed so much on the altar of patriotism 
during the momentous national crisis of the early sixties, but as the years go 
by the immensity of their deeds will be realized to a fuller extent and each 
veteran will be accorded full measure of credit and praise. A member of this 
great army of patriots is Mark B. Briney, now a retired fanner of Shawnee 
township, Fountain county, a man who has spent his life in this vicinity, find- 
ing here ample opportunity for the exercise of his talents and he has done 
much for the general welfare of the same, being public-spirited and a good 
neighbor. 

Mr. Briney was born in Shawnee township. Fountain count}-, Indiana, 
August 2, 1840. He is the son of William S. and Eleanor (McMillen) 
Briney, natives of Butler and Clark counties, Ohio, respectively, the father 
coming to Fountain county at the age of nine years in 1831, and the mother 
in 1825. They were the parents of four children, namely: Daniel, who 
lives in Shawnee township; Mark B., of this sketch; Alexander died in 1875; 
Sarah E. married Oliver M. Marshall, deceased. 

William S. Briney was a Democrat, a member of the Sons of Temper- 
ance, and he held a membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Daniel McMillen, the maternal grandfather of the subject, came to 
Fountain county, Indiana, in 1825, and built one of the first mills in Shawnee 
township in 1827. He bought considerable land and also bought mill prop- 
erty up and down Big Shawnee, and he followed milling and farming all his 
life, becoming widely known in this section of the state, being a man of con- 
siderable influence and financial standing. Mark Briney, the subject's paternal 



682 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

grandfather, came to this county from Butler county, Ohio, in 1831, and 
located first in Troy township, where he entered land hum the government 
and followed farming all his life, becoming the owner of nearly three hun- 
dred acres of excellent land. His family consisted of twelve children, only 
one of whom is living, Mrs. Margaret Hutson, of Covington, Indiana. 

Mark B. Briney grew to manhood on the home place and received his 
education in the common schools 01" Shawnee township. Early in life he took 
up farming for a livelihood and this continued to claim his close attention 
until the year jyoj when he retired, having accumulated a competency through 
his long years of industry. Me is the owner of a fine farm of two hundred 
and fifty-five acres, ail well improved, two hundred acres being under a high 
state of cultivation. He has a pleasant home and is well fixed to enjoy a 
serene old age. 

Mr. Briney enlisted on August 13, iKGj, in Company C, Eighty-sixth 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was mustered into service at Indianapolis. 
lie was sent to the Army of the Cumberland where he saw much hard service. 
He was in the battle of Perryville and other hotly contested engagements. 
He was honorably discharged at Nashville, Tennessee, February 19, 1863, 
having made a faithful and gallant soldier for the Union. 

Politically, Mr. Briney is a Democrat, and fraternally he belongs to the 
Woodmen of the World and the Modern Woodmen of America. 

Mr. Briney was married on August [9, 1869, to Alary E. Manlove, 
daughter of William Manlove, and to this union the following children were 
born: Mark M. and Edna L„ both died in infancy; Okie married William C. 
Hushaw and they have two children, George Carson and Clay Benton. 



L. B. WILSON. 



The general public has ever manifested interest in tracing the history of 
a man who, despite the fact of his having commenced life at the bottom of 
the ladder, has worked upward courageously, round by round, until attaining 
the goal of success and winning the plaudits of his fellow citizens. The 
career of the widely known and public-spirited man whose name appears 
above affords a striking example of what industry and energy, controlled 
by correct moral principles, can accomplish in overcoming an unfavorable 
environment and elevating their possessor to a position of usefulness and in- 
fluence. Mr. Wilson is too well known in Fountain county to need a formal 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 683 

introduction to the readers of this volume and the following lines contain but 
a brief review of his career. 

L. B. Wilson is a native of Montgomery count}-, Indiana, and a son of 
W. W. and Sophia Wilson, the father burn in Hamilton county, Ohio, tin- 
mother in Butler county, Ohio. W. \Y. Wilson came to Indiana in an earl} 
day and was among the substantial pioneers of Montgomery county, where 
he farmed, and he ran a saw-mill and manufactured drain tile while living in 
Tippecanoe county. His death occurred at a ripe old age. Before her mar- 
riage Mrs. Wilson was Miss Sophia McGinnis. She departed this life in 1907 
in Fountain county, the mother of eleven children, six of whom are living, 
the subject of this sketch being the only member of the family residing in 
Davis township. 

L. B. Wilson received his early educational training in the district 
schools of Montgomery county and subsequently prepared himself for a busi- 
ness career by taking a course in a commercial college at Danville, Illinois. 
After being graduated from the latter institution, he accepted a clerkship in 
a commercial house iii Illinois, tu which line of effort he devoted lour years 
and during the year ensuing served as salesman in a store at Crawfordsville, 
this state. Discontinuing clerking at the expiration of the period indicated, 
he returned to his home and after working for a while on the farm, came, in 
1892, to Davis township and purchased the place where he has since lived 
and made rapid and substantial advancement as an enterprising farmer and 
stock raiser. 

When Mr. Wilson moved to his present beautiful place it contained 
little that was pleasing to the eye, but much that was calculated to discourage 
one of less energy and determination than himself. Only a small part of the 
land had been improved and the buildings were small and in poor condition. 
With his characteristic energy, however, he addressed himself to the task- 
before him and it was not long until another and much fairer prospect pre- 
sented itself. By well-directed industry and good management he succeeded 
in reducing the greater part of his lands to cultivation, and in due time tin- 
old buildings were replaced with substantial modern structures, and a spirit 
of thrift appeared to prevail over the entire premises. Mr. Wilson's progress 
since taking possession of his farm has been most commendable and gained 
for him no small place among the successful agriculturists and stock raisers 
of his township. He devotes his attention to general farming and in the 
matter of live stock makes specialties of fine graded hogs and Percheron 
horses, his success in raising the latter breed of animals giving him a reputa- 
tion much more than local. 



684 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Mr. Wilson is essentially a self-made man, the fine two-hundred-twcnty- 
eight-acre farm, his valuable live stock interests, together with every dollar 
of the comfortable fortune which lie commands, being the result of his own 
energy, mature judgment, rare foresight and useful life and, as indicated in 
the initial paragraph, his example may be studied with profit by those whose 
characters are yet to be formed and fortunes gained, lie is a zealous Repub- 
lican of the most orthodox type and lias little sympathy for those who 
desert the principles of the party for new, untried and visionary political doc- 
trines. In his church relations he is a Methodist and for a number of years 
he has been a member of the Masonic lodge at Odell. 

Mr. Wilson was married in the year 1904 to Anna Carter, daughter of 
James F. Carter, of this county, whose sketch may be found elsewhere, the 
union resulting in the birth if two children, Opal A. and C. Harold. 



JOHN W. DUNKIN. 



in America, perhaps more than any other country, the man who has made 
all he has himself is looked upon as the most -entirely capable, the man upon 
whom one may most thoroughly rely. He knows the value of work and the 
value of money. He can more thoroughly enjoy the good things of life be- 
cause he has earned them all himself, and knows what it is to be without them. 
He can most really sympathize with men still at the ropes, because he has been 
there himself. There are many such self-made men in Indiana, and among 
them axe prosperous farmers who have gained all they have by diligently- 
driving nature to her utmost. Nature must be feminine, indeed, for she loves 
a master, and the man who has conquered her is richly rewarded. Among 
the men of Fountain county who have made all they own themselves is John 
W. Dunkin, one of the most prominent men in Davis township. 

Mr. Dunkin was born in Fountain county, Davis township, February 25, 
1855, and is the son of John and Annie (Van Meeter) Dunkin. His father 
was horn in Indiana, and lived in Davis township all of his life. He was a 
tiller of the soil, and highly respected by all in the neighboring district. He 
died in i860. They had five children, all but one of whom are alive. John 
W. Dunkin was raised on the farm and educated in the district school of 
Davis township, In 1882 he married Lucy Hall, daughter of Cornelius and 
Elizabeth (Cale) Hall. Her father came from Spaldin, Lincolnshire, Eng- 
land, where he had engaged in the shoe business. John and Lucy Dunkin 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COl NTIES, [ND1ANA. 685 

have had five children: Clarence, Grover and Peari arc at home on the farm. 
The other two children, Ernest and Lulu, arc decea ed. 

Mr. Uunkin's home is about six miles east of Attica, Indiana, lie as 
about two hundred and ten acres of land, all of which, with the exception of 
ten acres, is in a high .slate of cultivation, tie is interested in general farm- 
ing and his methods have gained rich rewards from the soil, lie has made a 
great many improvements on his place and it is one of the best equipped 
farms in Davis township. On it he has a lovely home and lives like a king 
with his little family. 

Mr. Duiikin is a Democrat, but he has never held any office, as his time 
has been too completely taken up on his land, lie is a member of the Knights 
of Pythias in Attica, Indiana, and is active in many public movements. 

lie is a good farmer and a good citizen, and the history of Davis town- 
ship would certainly be incomplete without the biography of this man who 
has done so much to help in her growth, and spent his whole life there. It is 
men such as he, men of sterling integrity, public spirit and diligent industry, 
that have made the American people what they are. 



WILLIAM II. BENDER. 

One of Davis township's progressive farmers is William H. Bender, a 
man who, although not especially favored by fortune in early life, forged 
ahead on his own account, beginning diligently and earnestly to work in order 
to advance himself in the world s affairs, at the same time doing what he 
could for the welfare of the community at large, and as a result of his habits 
of industry, public spirit, courteous demeanor and honorable career he enjoys 
the esteem and admiration of a host of friends in Fountain county, where he 
has maintained his home all his life and where he is known as one of the 
representative citizens of the section of the Hoosier state of which this 
volume deals. 

William H. Bender was born in Davis township, Fountain count)-, 
Indiana, June 15, 1856. He is the son of Isaac and Mary (Schnepp) Ben- 
der. Isaac Bender was born in the state of Pennsylvania, Berks county, and 
there his earlier years were spent, finally removing to Miami county, Ohio, 
and in the year 1851 he moved to Fountain county, Indiana, and established 
the permanent home of the family. Here he engaged in general farming 
and spent the rest of his life, having now been dead a number of years. The 



686 FOUNTAIN AND WARBEN COUNTIES., INDIANA. 

mother of the subject of ibis sketch was from Miami county, Ohio, near the 
cit) of Dayton. Five children were bum to these parents, namel) : Maggie, 
who lives in YVilliamsport, Indiana; Amanda died when live years old; 
William H., of this sketch, was next, in order of birth; \oah died when two 
years old; Anna, the youngest, is deceased. The father of the above named 
children was a Democrat, but held no office, and religiously he was a Lutheran. 

William H. Bender, of this sketch, grew up on the home farm and 
received his education in the common schools, in the year 1892 he was 
united in marriage with Minnie Snyder, daughter of John Snyder and wife, 
both natives of Pennsylvania, where they grew up, were married and re- 
mained there. The death of Mr. Bender's wife occurred in 1904, leaving 
one child, Mabel, who lives at home and keeps house for her father. 

Mr. Bender has devoted his life to general farming, handling some 
good stock the meanwhile, and he has a very pleasant home in Davis town- 
ship, not far from Attica. He made most of the improvements on his place 
and has a fine home, comprising one hundred sixty-six acres of land in Davis 
township, all well improved and productive. 

Politically, he is a Democrat, but he has never taken much interest in 
political affairs and has held no offices. Fraternally, he belongs to the Free 
and Accepted Masons, Lodge No. 129, at Odell, Indiana, also belongs to the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, also at Odell. 



GEORGE W. PARK ELL. 

One of the citizens of Richland township, Fountain county, Indiana, 
who has enjoyed distictive prestige among the enterprising men of this local- 
ity is George W. Parnell, who has fought his way onward and upward to a 
prominent position in industrial circles, and in every relation of life his voice 
and influence have ever been on the side of right as he sees and understands 
the right. He has always been interested in every movement for the general 
welfare of the community and liberally supports such enterprises as make 
for the betterment of his fellow men in the county honored by his life-long 
citizenship. He comes of one of our oldest and most highly respected fami- 
lies, being the son of Robert and Minerva (Bowyer) Parnell, the father hav- 
ing been one of the substantial and influential citizens here during the early 
history of the county. 

George W. Parnell was born in Logan township, Fountain count)-, In- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 68/ 

cliana, January jo, 1863, and is one of seven children, namely: Thomas B., 
who lives in California; Horace E. is at Inane; George \V., subject of this 
review; Charles M. lives at Warsaw, Indiana; Dela E., who is at home; 
Wilbur F. lives in Richland township; Alice P. married J. It. McBroom and 
the} - live in El Paso, Texas. These children arc the heirs of the fine old Par- 
nell homestead in Richland township. 

George W. Parnell grew to manhood on the home place and there lie 
assisted with the genera! work when a hoy during crop seasons; attending the 
common schools in the winter time. On February 27, 1890, he was united 
in marriage with Lenua Van Meter, daughter of Harrison and Mary Van 
Meter, early settlers in Fountain county and a highly respected family. 
Three children were bora to Mr. and Mrs. Parnell, Robert Leland, who is at 
home, and two who died in infancy. The wife and mother was called to her 
rest in March, 1895. 

Mr. Parnell has been very successful in a business way and is one of the 
substantial and enterprising citizens of Richland township, where he has a 
pleasant home. 

The death of the mother of the subject occurred on April 1, 1912, at the 
old home place near Newtown, when lacking a little more than two months 
of her seventy-eighth year. Her parents were Thomas and Elizabeth Bow- 
yer, who came from Ross county, Ohio, in 1826, and settled on the old 
Bowyer homestead near Greenhill, Warren county, Indiana, where Mrs. 
Robert Parnell was born. When she was about fourteen years old she was 
converted and joined the Methodist Episcopal church, erected on one corner 
of the Bowyer homestead. As a young lady she attended the girls' school in 
Danville,, Illinois, and afterward entered the Thorntown Academy. On De- 
cember 31, 1857, when she was twenty-three years old, she was united in 
marriage to Robert Parnell, and together they came into the Bethel neighbor- 
hood and first settled on the farm now occupied by Isaac Waldrip. About 
1863 they returned to the Bowyer homestead in Warren county, where they 
spent two years, after which they came back, and since 1865 lived in the 
house near Newtown, in which Mrs. Parnell died. Robert Parnell purchased 
the land from Ellis Insley, who first entered it from the government, and the 
same buildings are on the place now as were there when the property was 
purchased in 1865. Of her father's family there are two that survive her, 
Eliza Bowyer Mather and Charley W. Boyer, both of Otterbein. Her life 
has been an exemplification of the saying that it is not all of life to live, nor 
all of death to die. To both her home and her church she was ever loyal, and 



688 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

during the last fifty years, when the duties of the family and the home were 
often burdensome, she found rest and peace in the Lord's Day and with her 
Bible. She was a charter member of the Woman's Foreign Missionary So- 
ciety of the Methodist church at Newtown, joining when it was organized 
during the pastorate of Rev. Le Sourd in 1878-79. She was a regular reader 
of the Western Christian Advocate, and never failed to renew her subscrip- 
tion. We get a little view of her life by a characteristic incident : On the night 
she was taken ill there lay on her table the Bible, "Pilgrim's Progress" and 
"Ben-Hur," all favorites with her. She was a good and useful woman, kind 
and genial, hospitable and loved to do charitable acts to those in need in her 
neighborhood, and many there are who have been helped by her on life's 
rushed road. 



BERT E. PAGE. 

The old-fashioned notion that hard work, patient industry and far-sight- 
edness make for success in the various avenues of life does not seem to be 
accepted so unreservedly in our day. The spread of pessimism engendered 
by many phases of our complex civilization is in a great measure responsible 
for the lack of faith in the old idea. However, if we observe conditions 
closely we will find that the intelligent individual, who leads a practical and 
industrious life, will reach a point of success commensurate with his efforts. 
The life of the subject of this sketch will afford us an instance of this. 

Bert E. Page, well known and successful grain dealer of the village of 
Mellott, Fountain county, Indiana, was born in Wayne county, this state, 
June 8, 1865. He is the son of N. H. and Lucy (Clark) Page, natives of 
North Carolina, each coming from an old Southern family, and they grew 
up and were married in the old Tar state, emigrating from there to Wayne 
county, Indiana, in' 1856, later moving to Hamilton county, this state, where 
the father lived until his death. The mother died in Wayne county in 1871. 
N. H. Page was a wagon-maker by trade and was very skillful in the same, 
his services being in great demand, but later in life he devoted his energies 
almost exclusively to general farming and was engaged in that at the time of 
his death. Politically, he was a Democrat, and he and wife belonged to the 
United Brethren church. They became the parents of five children, named as 
follows: Sarah is deceased; Rachael lives in Cicero, Indiana; James died in 
1876; Alice died in 1906; Bert E., subject of this sketch, who was the young- 
est of the children. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 689 

Bert E. Page grew to manhood on the heme farm and there, when of 
proper age, he assisted with the geneva) work, and in the winter time at- 
tended the common schools in his neighborhood in Hamilton county. When 
a young man he began life as a farmer, which he followed for three years, 
then took up the grain business, which lie has followed with ever-increasing 
success to the present time, having become widely known in this field of en- 
deavor and being regarded as one of the best informed men on grain topics 
in this section of Indiana. He first located at New Richmond. Indiana, where 
he had a large trade from the start, hut observing a larger field at Mellott, 
Fountain county, he has continued the grain business here for the past three 
years, building up a large and ever-widening trade with the surrounding 
country. He is in partnership with J. W. McCardle, and they operate under 
the firm name of McCardle & Page. They handle both grain and coal, and 
are very successful in both lines. 

Mr. Page was married on September 20, 1S91, to Anna Long, daughter 
of John and Rosetta ( Matson) Long, who came from Mercer county, Ohio, 
and settled in Linden, Indiana, Mr. Long having devoted his life to farming. 
His death occurred in Montgomery county, this state. The family, late in life, 
moved from Linden to New Richmond, the father and mother both dying at 
the latter place. 

Mr. Long was a Democrat politically, and he and his wife were Christ- 
ian Disciples. They became the parents of eight children, namely: George 
and William H. live at New Richmond; Alonzo lives in Windsor, Johnson 
county, Missouri; Benjamin lives at Champaign, Illinois; Anna, who married 
Mr. Page, of this review ; Arthur lives in Isabella, North Dakota ; Jessie May 
died when two years old; John A. lives in Lafayette, Indiana. 

Mr. Page is a Republican in his political faith, and religiously he belongs 
to the Christian Disciples church. He is a member of the Knights of Py- 
thias Lodge No. 433, at Newtown, Fountain county; also belongs to the Im- 
proved Order of Red Men, Tribe No. 114, at Mellott, this county. 



WILLIAM DICE. 



This gentleman is another representative of the families that came to 
Fountain county when this part of the country was a howling wilderness 
filled with wild animals and with roving bands of Indians. William Dice, one 
of our well known farmers and stock men, grew up with other pioneer 

(44) 









I 

I i 



industrii >us 



and 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 6qT 

vation and all well improved. They have kept it well tilled SO that it has 
retained its original fertility and they have kept the buildings remodeled and 
have been very successful as general farmers. 

William Dice was married in 1869 to Catherine Jones, daughter of 
Lawson and Maria (Burkett) Junes, natives of Kentucky, from which state 
they came to Fountain county, Indiana, where they spent the latter part of 
their lives, and died here. Mr. Jones was a tailor by trade. Three children 
were born to William Dice and wife: Hortense, who died when five years 
old; Cort W. is an attorney at Covington; Morris died in infancy. 

Politically, Mr. Dice is a Democrat and has held minor .offices. He met 
with a misfortune in 1900, being kicked by a horse, and has since been badly 
crippled in the hip, though he gets around fairly well and helps manage the 
work on the place. 

Mr. Dice has made all the latter-day improvements on the place, and has 
built a fine home two and one-half miles south of Veedersburg in Van 
Buren township. He has added some acreage to the old place, and has dealt 
some in real estate, buying and selling some farms. In religious matters he 
belongs to the Presbyterian church, in which his father was long active. In 
his earlier years the former attended church with the latter in school houses. 
log cabins, barns and brush arbors. The family have always been liberal sup- 
porters of the church and all good movements. 



MONROE HAAS. 



It is in such countries as the United States that full swing can be given 
to the energies of the individual. A man may choose any business or pro- 
fession he desires, and he is limited only by competition. He must meet the 
skill of others and give as good service as they or he will not find himself 
progressing very rapidly. Such adaptation to any work or business is well 
shown in the career of Monroe Haas, successful young business man of the 
village of Newtown, Richland township, Fountain county. lie has turned 
his hand to various things and proved that fanning was not the only occupa- 
tion which he could make successful. 

Mr. Haas was born in this township and county, on February 22, 1877. 
and is the son of James and Lydia (Hummings) Haas. The paternal grand- 
father, Jacob Haas, was one of the earliest settlers in Richland township. He 
was a mason by trade and became well known to the early pioneers through- 



C92 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

out |he county, doing much work for them. Later in life he conducted a har- 
ness shop, finally removing to California, where he now resides. 

Five children were born to James Haas and wife, three of whom are 
living at this writing, namely: Minnie, who married J. R. Davis, lives in Salt 
Lake City, Utah; Lena, who married Bert Hushaw, lives in Newtown, this 
county; Mary and Mattie, twins, are deceased; Monroe, of this sketch, was 
the youngest. 

Monroe Haas grew to manhood in his native community and he re- 
ceived his education in the common schools, also the high school at Welling- 
ton, Kansas, and the Valparaiso Business College, at Valparaiso, Indiana, 
thus receiving an excellent text-book training. He went to Kansas in his 
boyhood days and remained there some time, finally returning to his native 
township, where he took up fanning, first beginning working out as a hired 
hand. He followed barbering four years at Wingate, Veedersburg and other 
places. Later he established a grocery store and restaurant in Newtown, 
which he still conducts, enjoying a large and rapidly growing trade. He 
carries a well selected line of staple and fancy groceries, serves soft drinks, 
and his restaurant is popular with the general public. 

Mr. Haas was married on December 12, 1901, to Delia Rodgers, daugh- 
ter of Samuel and Elizabeth (Shute) Rodgers, who live on a farm in Ver- 
million county, where they have resided for some time and are well and 
favorably known. 

Mr. Haas has built a neat, cozy home at Newtown and he has become 
very comfortably established through his individual efforts. He is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



CHARLES E. ARCHER. 

Among the best farmers of Fountain county, Indiana, are the Archers. 
This statement will appear as possessing the highest element of truth by those 
at all familiar with the various members of this old family, for a glance at the 
fine farm, owned and operated by Charles E. Archer, of Richland township, 
shows that it has been so skillfully manipulated and so carefully looked after 
during the seventy-five years that has elapsed since grandfather Archer took 
possession of it, that it has lost none of its original fertility and strength of 
soil, for its owners (it has never been out of the Archer family) seem to 
have been natural-born husbandmen, with a proper knowledge of soils, grains, 



MR. AND MRS. CHARLES JO. ARCHER. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 693 

climatic conditions, the rotation of crops, etc., so as to get the largest results 

from their work as litis] landmen. This is one of the very oldest families in 
the county, and the locality in which they have lived has been greatly benefited 
by their work and their influence, they haying ever been men of public spirit 
and neighborly impulses, willing to do their full share in the general up- 
building of the county. 

Charles E. Archer was bom in Richland township, Fountain county, 
Indiana, December 13, 1857. He is the son of James and Harriet (Ray) 
Archer. The father was born in this county, February 9. 1H27. being the 
first white child born in Richland township, and here he grew to manhood 
amid pioneer conditions and worked hard when a boy in assisting in the de- 
veloping of the home farm from the. wilderness, and here he received such 
education in the log school houses of his neighborhood. Here he and Martha 
Rivers were married, upon reaching maturity. She bore him two children 
who died in infancy, and she herself passed away in 1854. He then married 
Harriett Ray, by whom one child w : as born, Charles E. Archer, subject of 
this sketch. For a fuller history of the Rivers family the reader is directed 
to the sketch of John J. Rivers, w r hich appears on another page of this volume. 
James Archer devoted his life to general farming in his native county and 
was successful in his life work, and his death occurred . n his farm here in 
1906 at the advanced age of seventy-nine years, six months and nine days. 
He had been preceded to the grave by his wife, mother of the subject, in 
January, 1904, she having been seventy-five years old. Samuel Archer, pa- 
ternal grandfather of the subject, who was in the early days sheriff* of Mont- 
gomery county, Ohio, removed to Richland township, Fountain county, in 
October, 1826, and entered land from the government, where his grandson, 
Chari. j E. Archer, the subject, now resides. He began life in typical pioneer 
fashion, in the woods, when neighbors were few and privations and hard- 
ships the rule. He was a justice of the peace, also a county commissioner at 
the time of his death. 

Charles E. Archer grew to manhood on the home farm and there made 
himself generally useful in his boyhood, attending the public schools what 
time he was not at work on the home place. He has always been a farmer 
and is still actively and successfully engaged. He has made a specialty of 
stock raising, being well known as a cattle and hog feeder, and no small part 
of his annual income has been derived from his judicious handling of live 
stock. He is the owner of a fine and well improved farm of two hundred 
and forty-one acres, on which stand a pleasant home and large convenient 
outbuildings. 



694 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Mr. Archer was married on January 1, [880, to Laura .Mice Short, 
daughter of James and Mandy (Kemp) Short, the father a native of Wash- 
ington county, Indiana, and the mother was burn in Fountain county. She 
passed away in 1892, at the age of sixty years. James Short, a highly respected 
citizen, is still living. Two children have been born to the subject and wife, 
James, who married Teda Waller, daughter of John Waller, of Kentucky, and 
thev live at Melou, tlii county. Fannie E. Archer married Thomas \\ iggans, 
and they live in Richland township, this county. 

Politically. Mr. Archer is a Republican, and he belongs to the Christian 
Disciples church. He has filled the office of township supervisor for the past 
five years in a very satisfactory manner. He is a member of the Improved 
Order of Red Men and of the Anti-Horse Thief Association. 



DENNIS WILLSON. 



Eighty-three years have come and gone since the venerable and honored 
subject of this sketch first opened his eyes to the light of day, and they have 
been years well spent by him, for he was reared by good sterling pioneer par- 
ents, and had good training and he has not departed from his raising. He 
has spent nearly all his days in this locality, having been brought here when 
an infant and he has lived to see and take a conspicuous part in the develop- 
ment of the same. He recalls many interesting reminiscences of the early 
days and he has enjoyed the friendship of all who have come into contact with 
him, for he has tried to live by the Golden Rule, and while laboring for his 
own good has not neglected his duties as a citizen. 

Dennis Willson was born in Warren county, Ohio, February 26, 1829. 
He is the son of Asa and Elizabeth (Slaughter) Willson, who spent then- 
earlier lives in Ohio, coming to Fountain county, Indiana, in February, 1830, 
when the subject was one year old. The father was a native of New Jersey 
and the mother was born in New York. The)' were married in Cincinnati, 
and lived there for some time prior to coming to Indiana. They settled at 
the town of Rob Roy, where they remained six years, then moved to Scott's 
Prairie, in 1836, which is today but a few hours' drive, but at that time the 
journey required two days, made with an ox team. They camped at Coal 
creek beside a burning log heap. The family became very comfortably lo- 
cated on the prairie mentioned above, and there a good farm was developed, 
on which the father of the subject spent the rest of his life. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIESj INDIANA. 695 

Dennis W'illson grew to manhood on the home farm and helped with the 
work of clearing the same and getting it tinder cultivation, so became ac- 
quainted with hard work when lie was but a boy. He received a meager ed- 
ucation in the old-time schools taught in the country, and earl) in life he 
learned the carpenter's trade, "which he followed in connection with farming, 
and he has made a success of his life work, having made a very comfortable 
living. 

Dennis W'illson is the fourth in order of birth in a family of twelve chil- 
dren, the others being named as follows: Amos died at the advanced age of 
eighty-live years; Martha J. died July 29, 1909; David died young; Mary,, 
deceased; William, deceased; Asa, deceased; two died in infancy. 

Dennis Willson married, on January 9, 1856, Martha Shell, daughter of 
Strother and Elizabeth (Moudy) Shell. Her father was born in Virginia, 
but reared in Tennessee, and her mother was a native of Ohio, from which 
state she came to Fountain county, Indiana, when the country was new, set- 
tling two and one-half miles southeast of Veedersburg, and there her parents 
remained until their deaths. 

Three children were born to the subject and wife, namely : Albert died 
when three months old; Losadie died when two years old; Freeman S. died 
at the age of twenty years. 

Mr. Willson took up farming at Steam Corner, then removed to Cain 
tuwnship in 1870, later taking up his residence at Hillsboro, where he lived 
until the death of his wife, on July 3, 1910, when he moved to Kingman 
where he now lives with his sister. 

Mr. Willson is one of the honored veterans of the Civil war, having en- 
listed on September 26, 1864, in Company I, Fortieth Indiana Volunteer In- 
fantry, and he served very creditably in the Army of the Cumberland, under 
Captain Dunn, General George M. Thomas' division. He was mustered out 
at New Orleans, July 15, 1865. 

Politically, Mr. Willson was originally a Whig, and when the Repub- 
lican party was formed in 1856 he cast his lot with them and voted for Abra- 
ham Lincoln in i860. He has since been a loyal supporter of this party. He 
was for some time a justice of the peace, filling the office with credit to him- 
self and to the satisfaction of the people. He was formerly a member of the 
Grange. Religiously, he has been a most worthy member of the Christian 
Disciple church for years. 



696 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

FRANK ZELRO HELMS. 

( Ine of the foremost citizens and most prominent men along man} lines 
in Shawnee township. Fountain count), Indiana, is Frank Z. Helms, sun of 

Alien \V. Helms, whose life and achievements may be found set down in this 
history. He has not only been a successful farmer, but has taken an active 
interest in a number of business enterprises that have reflected much good to 
his community. His is the ideal American life — that of an active business 
man, living in the country, having all the facilities of city life, as well as the 
enjoyment of living where the' air is pure and where things grow. 

Frank Zelro Helms was born January 29, 186.;, in Warren county, near 
State Line. He was educated in the common schools at Griffith, and after- 
wards attended Merom College at Merom, Sullivan county, Indiana, for two 
years. "Wishing to become well versed in business methods and modes of 
attainment, Mr. Helms then attended the Bryant & Stratton Business College 
at Chicago, Illinois, for about six months. He was then prepared to take up 
the work on his farm scientifically, and has proved that the farmer, as well as 
the business man, has more reason to work mentally than physically, and that 
mixing brains with the soil brings threefold results. 

On November 17, 1886, Mr. Helms married Minnie Palin, daughter of 
Jesse Palin. of Newtown, Indiana. The}' have bad five children: Flossie 
May married Frederick Rice, and they are farming near Newtown, Indiana; 
Cary Fern married Ed S. Brown, a banker at Wingate, Indiana; Zealtea, Zone 
Allen and Doan Jessie are all at home. 

Mr. Helms is a member of the. New Light Christian church, which his 
father helped to build, and he has been active in church work since his youth, 
having been clerk since he was eighteen years of age. He is a Republican 
and has been a leader of the people along political lines. 

Mr. Helms has a farm of three hundred and forty-five acres, most of 
which is in a high state of cultivation, as he has practiced what he has learned 
in theory, and his land is very productive. He is progressive and has a 
number of modern improvements on his place, all of which he has made 
himself. He has not limited his efforts to his farm, however, and when the 
question of the organization of a telephone company was raised in the com- 
munity, Mr. Helms was one of the first to declare for it and was active in its 
organization and promotion. He is also interested in financial affairs, and is 
one of the directors of the Central National Bank at Attica, Indiana, and has 
held a prominent position on the board for about ten years. 

Having such wide and varied interests Mr. Helms has that broader 




FRANK Z. HELMS. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 697 

viewpoint which enables him to be a fair judge of human affairs and a capa- 
ble advisor for his neighbors in financial matters. He puts a great deal of 
himself in all that he is interested in and does his best to make all that he 
touches successful. lie need not fear if the test is made of his life by tin- 
rule, "by their works ye shall judge them," for his works better than any 
words will make his influence live ami immortalize, him. 



FRANK A. NAVE. 



There is no arbitrary rule for winning success, yet in the career of 
every man who has attained standing and influence among his fellow men, 
there are lessons which may be studied to advantage. The individual who 
gains property and wins for himself a name is the one who sees and utilizes 
the opportunities that come his way. The essential conditions of human life 
are ever pretty much the same, the surroundings of men differing more in 
imagination than in reality. When one individual passes another on the 
highway of life to reach the goal of prosperity, it is largely because he pos- 
sesses the power to use advantages which in all probability encompass the 
whole civilized race. In the life of the enterprising man, whose life biog- 
raphy is herewith presented is found the ability to utilize every advantage 
that tends to promote bis interests, also a power to create rather than to wait 
for those opportunities deemed essential to success in the noble calling to 
which his energy, well-balanced judgment and rare foresight have been 
devoted. 

Among Fountain county's distinguished citizens and leading men of 
affairs the name of Frank A. Nave has been very prominent. As proprietor 
and manager of the largest and best improved individual farm in_ Indiana, 
he has achieved a reputation in agricultural circles throughout the state second 
to that of none of his contemporaries, while in the matter of successful farm- 
ing and the breeding and raising of fine live stock, he has been a forceful 
factor among his neighbors and fellow citizens and a recognized authority on 
all matters relating to his vocation. 

Mr. Nave is one of Fountain county's native sons, and was born in 
Logan township on October 26, 1868. He belongs to one of the old and 
esteemed families of this part of the state, his grandfather, John Nave, hav- 
ing moved from Ohio to Fountain county as early as the year 1828 and 
located in Logan township on a portion of the farm now owned by the subject, 



698 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

in addition to which he also purchased a tract of government land near 
Attica. He at once began improving what afterwards became the family 
homestead, but did not live long enough to enjoy much of the results of his 

toil, as his death occurred in 1831, three years after his arrival. Henry Nave, 
son of John and father of Frank A., was born in Ohm and removed with his 
parents to Fountain county when a young man and in due time became one 
of the leading agriculturists and influential citizens of Logan township. Dur- 
ing the first few years he threshed his wheat with the aid of the time-honored 
flail and marketed it at New Orleans by means of flat boat, returning by 
stage to Evansville, from which place to his home he not infrequently made 
his way on foot. He was a public-spirited citizen, who always took an active 
part in the development and growth of his section of country and did more 
perhaps for the material advancement of his immediate community than any 
other man. He was a local leader of the Democratic party during the early 
history of the county, manifested a timely interest in public matters and was 
long esteemed one of the leaders of thought and molders of opinion among 
his neighbors and fellow citizens. He died on the home farm near Attica on 
August 29, 1890, and left to each of his children a valuable farm and, what 
is better, the priceless heritage of an honorable family name. 

Mary U. Shannon, wife of Henry Nave, survived her husband and at 
the present time lives Avith her daughter, Mrs. Conover, in Shawnee town- 
ship. Of her nine children, four only are living, namely: Margaret, widow 
of John Huddle; Alton P., who resides in Attica, has large farming interests 
in Ohio, where he spends a considerable portion of his time; Mary C. now 
Mrs. Conover, of Shawnee township; and Frank A., the subject of this 
sketch. 

Reared amid rural scenes, Frank A. Nave received his early training 
on the family homestead and while still young became familiar with the prac- 
tical duties of farm life and learned to place a correct estimate upon the 
nobility of husbandry and to appreciate its value and the value of consecu- 
tive effort in all of his undertakings. During the summer months his em- 
ployments were such as are common to country boys and after the crops had 
been tended and the harvests gathered and garnered he pursued his studies in 
the district schools. To these early years under the tutelage of parents whose 
high aims were to engraft upon the minds and hearts of their children such 
principles as would insure lives of usefulness and honor, he is indebted for 
the integrity of character and laudable ambition that have since pre-eminently 
distinguished him as a master of his calling and as a citizen in all the walks of 
life. The frugalities of the farmer's home, the chaste purity of its teachings 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 699 

and influences, the broad fields, the stately forests, the orchards, the meadows, 
the hill and dell, the song of birds, the hum of bees, the laughing brook— all 
the wealth and beauty that nature spreads out with a lavish hand, were among 
the teachers of his youth whose lesson- were never forgotten. It is not 
strange that amid such surroundings and under such wholesome influences 
at quite an early age he should have conceived a strong predilection for rural 
life and should have decided upon the time-honored vocation of agriculture as 
the pursuit best suited to his tastes and inclinations. 

Mr. Nave assisted his father in the cultivation of the homestead until 
the latter's death, when he began tiding the soil for himself on the part of 
the estate which fell to him. His success from the start was most gratifying 
and from time to time he was enabled to add to his realty until, in the course 
of a few years, he had one of the largest and best improved farms in Logan 
township and occupied a commanding place among the enterprising agricul- 
turists oi his county. Without narrating in detail the series of continuous 
advancements which have also made him not only the leading man of his 
calling in Fountain county, but also the largest and most successful in In- 
diana, suffice it to say that he has ever pursued an honorable, straightforward 
course, making a careful study of agricultural science and keeping in close 
touch with everything relating thereto, the practical knowledge thus acquired, 
backed by mature judgment, wise discretion and business ability of a high 
order, together with an energy and determination which never temporizes 
with difficulties or fosters such mental conditions as pessimism, his progress 
has been steady' and substantial and the proud position which he today holds 
among his contemporaries is to be attributed solely to his own well directed 
efforts and rare foresight. 

Some idea of the extent to which Mr. Nave has carried his agricultural 
interests may be obtained from the fact that his farm at this time embraces 
an area of eighteen hundred acres of as fine land as the county of Fountain 
can boast, every acre of which has been thoroughly developed and been made 
to yield to its full capacity that with which planted. As previously indicated, 
he cultivates the soil scientifically and with the latest and most approved im- 
plements and machinery, studies carefully the nature of soils and to what 
each is best adapted, and so accurate has been the wisdom and judgment dis- 
played in the management of his splendid estate that such a condition as a 
crop failure has been practically unknown since he began operations for him- 
self. To keep the farm under the high state of tillage for which it is noted, 
the services of from twelve to twenty men are required throughout the year 
and under the watchful eye and judicious management of Mr. Nave, every- 



700 FOUNTAIN AND WARKEN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

thing on the place moves with the systematic regularity which bespeaks 
thorough discipline, also a reciprocity of interest between employer and 
employe, which has ever made their relations mutually harmonious and prof- 
itable. Air. Nave raises upon an average of one hundred thousand bushels 
of small grain annually, which he threshes with his own machines and in 
addition thereto grows corn crops sufficient to feed five hundred beef cattle 
and from eight hundred to one thousand hogs, all of which he ships to the 
larger markets where they command the highest prices. As a raiser of fine 
live stock, especially the higher grades of cattle, he has achieved national 
repute and to him at one time belonged the honor of having the champion 
herd of pure bred Herefords in America, over two hundred head, ninety-six 
of which he sold for the sum of sixty-four thousand dollars, the highest 
average on record for the Hereford breed, one of the animals bringing over 
eight thousand dollars. 

Mr. Nave has every known convenience for the raising of cattle and 
his motto has ever been that it costs less to raise a good animal than a poor 
one, to say nothing of the difference between the two in value. He mani- 
fests commendable pride in his live stock, for which, as previously stated, 
there is always a great demand, and in a recent shipment consisting of seven- 
teen car loads of cattle he received the highest price per car load ever paid at 
the Union stock yards in Chicago. His reputation as a breeder and feeder is 
known to every raiser of live stock in the nation, and from time to time he has 
received some big prices for especially fine cattle for show purposes. This, 
with his record of having received the highest price ever paid for cattle by 
the car load in the leading markets of the United States, niakes him un- 
deniably the banner cattle raiser of the country, a fact of which not only 
himself, but his friends and fellow citizens throughout the country, feel 
justly proud. 

Mr. Nave has not been sparing in the matter of improvements, as his 
splendid and commodious modern dwelling, ample barns and other buildings 
abundantly attest. It has been frequently remarked by those who have traveled 
extensively that his farm is without doubt the largest and most valuable in- 
dividual farm in Indiana, and as a beautiful country home with nothing lack- 
ing in the way of modern impro\ lents, conveniences and attractive features, 
including well-kept lawns, taste i ally arranged gardens, and trees yielding 
both fruit and shade, it is perhaps without a rival in any rural district in the 
state, besides ranking among the most desirable places of residence in the 
entire country. While primarily interested in his own affairs and making 
every other consideration subordinate thereto, Mr. Nave has not been un- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 7OI 

mindful of the interests of others, or of the duty which as a citizen he owes 
to the community. Public spirited in the broadest sense of the term and 
alive to every enterprise having for its object the material advancement of 
his township and county and the general welfare of the people, he has been 
influential in promoting these ends in various ways, being a natural leader 
whose counsel carries weight and whose opinions always command respect. 
He possesses in an eminent degree those qualities which elevate and adorn 
mankind, is firm and well grounded in his convictions, and, as an intelligent, 
up-to-date American, takes broad views of men and affairs and makes his 
influence and presence felt among "all with whom he mingles or has business 
relations. As a farmer and stock raiser he is without a peer in his county and 
has no superior in Indiana, and to his efforts is largely due the revival of 
farming interests in his part of the state and the advanced position which 
Fountain county .holds as a rich and progressive agricultural region. In 
politics he is practically independent, and with the exception of serving with 
marked ability as a member of the state board of agriculture, he has neither 
held nor aspired to office or public distinction. His financial success has been 
commensurate with his extensive farming and live stock interests, and since 
succeeding to his share of the paternal estate, he has by his own efforts in- 
creased his holdings by the addition of fifteen hundred acres of valuable land, 
which fact bears eloquent testimony to his ability as a careful business man 
and far-seeing financier. He is essentially a practical man with a well bal- 
anced mental organism and his plans, which are always carefully matured, 
seldom if ever fail to materialize, and on all matters within the range of his 
vocation his judgment is sound and his advice is pertinent and eminently 
worthy of acceptance by those desiring to profit by his experience. 

In the year 1894, Mr. Nave was joined in marriage to Grace Crawford, 
daughter of John Crawford, an old settler of the county and an ex-soldier, 
whose sketch appears elsewhere in these pages, and who is now an honored 
resident of Shawnee township. Mr. and Mrs. Nave have had five children, 
namely: Hansel, Cyril, Arthur, Charles O. and Paul Y., all living and under 
the parental roof except the oldest. 



WILLIAM COWGILL. 

One of the most prominent and popular men of Warren count)', Indiana, 
is William Cowgill, who has been active in the affairs of that district for a 
number of years. Mr. Cowgill has spent all of his life in this county, and has 



702 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

always put forth his energies in every cause of common good, whereby the 
community might he benefited. The esteem and regard of his friends and 
neighbors is evidenced by the fact that lie now holds the office of .county 
sheriff, his offices being in the court house at W.Uliamsport, Indiana, in which 
town he now resides. 

William Cowgill was born at Greenhill, in Warren county, October 5, 
1872. and he is the son of Joel and Jennie (Timmons) Cowgill, who also 
were natives of Indiana. His grandfather, Lemuel Cowgill, was a harness- 
maker and was born in the East, being the son of one of the Cowgill brothers 
who originally came to this country from England and settled in Philadel- 
phia. Lemuel Cowgill came West and Joel was born in Marion county, 
southwest of Indianapolis. He was a small farmer, more interested in things 
spiritual than in the temporal affairs of life. He early turned his attention 
to theology, and entirely through his own efforts was educated and ordained 
in the general conference as a minister of the United Brethren 
church. This left to his son William a great deal of care of the farm, as 
he was occupied with his local charges, and the boy early gained a very prac- 
tical and thorough knowledge of agriculture, its methods and results. Joel 
Cowgill died March 18, 190 1, and his widow is making her home with her 
son William. They were the parents of eight children, or whom William is 
the fourth child. 

William Cowgill was educated in the common schools of Warren 
county, supplemented by some schooling in Tippecanoe county. He was nat- 
.urally a hustler and early learned that hard work was sure to bring results in 
agricultural pursuits, no matter how much seemed to be the product of chance. 
He worked on his father's farm until he was about thirty years of age, not only! 
being of great assistance to the family, but prospering on his own account. 
On January 9, 1905, he was married to Myrtle Brown. They never had any 
children, and she died August 13, 1906, and was buried in Warren county. 
After that her husband threw himself more entirely into public interests. He. 
was living in Independence when he was elected sheriff in 191 1. He ran 
against five strong men for nomination to this office and it was because of 
his popularity, and the trust of his friends and neighbors in his justice and 
ability to execute the duties of the office that placed him in this position. Dur- 
ing his time in office, about a year and a half, Mr. Cowgill has appointed a new- 
deputy sheriff. 

Mr. Cowgill has not restricted his activities to his own community, either 
socially or in a business way, and his connections outside of the neighbor- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARRKN COUNTIES, INDIANA. /O3 

hood have only assisted him in his work there. lie is a member of the Odd 
Fellow? in the first degree, he is a second-degree Mason, and lias taken the 
third degree in the Improved Order of Red Men. 

Mr. Cowgill has proved very earnest in all that he has undertaken, and 
has been successful in his enterprises. He is energetic, progressive and active 
in standing up for all that he believes to be right. It is to such men as he that 
Warren county owes her progress and prosperity. 



STEPHEN T. RANDOLPH. 

It is a well authenticated fact that success comes not as the caprice of 
chance, but as the legitimate result of well applied energy and unflagging 
determination in a course of action once decided upon by the individual. 
Only those who diligently seek the goddess Fortuna, find her — she never was 
known to smile benignly upon the idler or the indolent dreamer of dreams. 
The subject of this sketch clearly understood this fact early in life when he 
was casting about for a legitimate and promising line to follow, and in trac- 
ing his life history it is plainly seen that the prosperity he enjoys has been won 
by commendable qualities, and it is also his personal worth which has gained 
for him the good standing among the citizens of the eastern part of Fountain 
county where he is so well known and where he maintained his home. 

• Stephen T. Randolph, successful groceryman at Newtown, Indiana, was 
born in Fulton township, Fountain county, January 15, 1869, and is a son 
of Harrison and Jennie (Wright) Randolph. The father was born in Fulton 
township, Fountain county, while the mother is a native of Montgomery 
county, Indiana, having spent her earliest years near the town of Linden, 
where her people were long well known. Aaron F. Randolph, the paternal 
grandfather, had a family of five children, of whom three, Harrison (father 
of the subject), Henry, William, were named for Gen. William Henry Har- 
rison, of whom the elder Randolph was a great admirer. 

Stephen T. Randolph, of this sketch, grew to manhood on the home farm 
and there he made himself generally useful as a boy and he received a fairly 
good education in the common schools of his native township. He worked at 
various things in his earlier life and by good management and economy got 
a good start. For the past four years he has been engaged in the grocery 
business at Newtown, Fountain county, and has built up a large and growing 
trade, drawing his customers from a wide territory. He carries a large, fresh 



7O4 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

and well selected stock of staple and fancy groceries at all seasons and he 
is known to treat his many customers with uniform courtesy and kindness. 

Mr. Randolph was married on June n, 1902, to Lura Dell Schermer- 
horn, daughter of A. C. and Rhoda E. (Martin) Schermerhorn. Her mother 
was a daughter of John S. and Ellen Martin. Both these families have long 
been prominent in Fountain county, and they are given further consideration 
on other pages of this work. Two children have been born to the subject and 
wife, namely: The eldest died in infancy; Allen F. is at home. 

Politically, Mr. Randolph is a Republican, but he has never held office. 
Fraternally, he belongs to the Free and Accepted Masons, Lodge No. 205, 
Richland township. 



DAVID B. FOSTER. 



The king of America today is indeed the farmer. Upon him the very 
life of the city dweller depends. He may view his broad acres with the satis- 
faction that all he surveys is his own, and the produce is the result of his 
own labor of thought and brawn. With the modern implements in use today, 
his work is not even as arduous as in the century past and, unlike the toiler in 
most fields of life, he may see the result of his work. His life is more peaceful 
and more natural. One of the royalty of Fountain county, Indiana, is David 
B. Foster, who has long been one of the most successful farmers in his part 
of the country. 

Mr. Foster is the grandson of Benjamin Foster, who came from Ohio to 
Fountain county when the country was in a primeval state, and, selecting land 
in Shawnee township, cleared it and introduced agriculture where before 
nature unchained had run wild. He had six children: Basil was farming at 
home during his lifetime; then there were Sarah, Polly, Martha, James and 
John. The latter came to this county about the age of thirty and settled on a 
farm. He married Abigail Kendall, a native of Virginia, and they had seven 
children, namely: Martha, Milton and Nelson died in infancy, and Basil, who 
farmed at home for a while, is now dead ; Ella married William Hughes, 
deceased, of Attica, Indiana; Mrs. Frances Jones, of Lafayette, is the other 
daughter. David B. was born March 19, 1851, on the old home place on 
which he now lives. His mother was a faithful member of the Methodist 
church, and his father a stanch Republican. He died in 1879, at the age of 
sixty-nine years, and she died in 1871, at the age of fifty-eight. They are 
tenderly remembered by many of the inhabitants of Shawnee township. 




MR. AND MRS. DAVID B. FOSTER. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. JO$ 

David B, Foster was educated in Shawnee township at the district 
school, and afterward went to school for a year in Attica, Indiana. When he 
was through school he went home to the farm to apply there what he had 
learned in theory, rather than lose himself with hundreds of others in a large 
city, where his life and capabilities would be warped in close offices, among 
nature-starved workers. He married, December 13, 1870, Ruth E. Stafford, 
daughter of William Stafford, who came to this state from Ohio. They have 
two children, namely: Evelyn M. Foster married T. Chalmer Schultz, of 
Newtown, Indiana, and John W. married lone Putnam, and they have one 
daughter, Elizabeth. 

Mr. Foster is independent in thought and independent in politics. He 
does not vote that his party may win, but votes for the man who will best fill 
the position in question for the welfare of the country. He is one of the 
largest land owners in Shawnee township, owning in his own name four 
hundred acres of land and having three hundred and sixty acres more in the 
names of his children. All of .this, with the exception of about one hundred 
acres of timber land, is in a high state of cultivation arid highly -improved. 
Mr. Foster has made most of the improvements on the place, and his farm is 
one of the most productive in that part of the country. 

Mr. Foster is now retired, living off of his well tilled acres, and merely 
oversees the work on his farm. His rest has been well earned, and he may 
now take life easy, and lend his friendly aid and counsel to a larger circle 
than when his time was taken up by his more immediate interests. He is one 
of the most important citizens of Shawnee township. 



JUDGE JAMES McCABE. 

Standing out distinctly as one of the central figures of the judiciary of 
Indiana of the generations that are past is the name of the late Judge James 
McCabe, of Williarnsport. Prominent in legal circles and equally so in pub- 
lic matters beyond the confines of W r arren county, with a reputation in one 
of the most exacting of professions that won him a name for distinguished 
services second to that of none of his contemporaries, there was for many 
years no more prominent or honored man in western Indiana, which he long 
dignified with his citizenship. Achieving success in the courts at an age 
when most young men are just entering upon the formative period of their 
lives, wearing the judicial ermine with becoming dignity and bringing to 

(45) 



706 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

every case submitted to him a clearness of perception and ready power of 
analysis characteristic of the learned jurist, his name and work for decades 
were allied with the legal institutions, public enterprises and political inter- 
ests of the state in such a way as to earn him recognition as one of the dis- 
tinguished citizens in a community noted for the high order of its talent. A 
high purpose and an unconquerable will, vigorous mental powers, diligent 
study and devotion to duty were some of the means by which he made him- 
self eminently useful, and every ambitious youth who fights the battle of life 
with the prospect of ultimate success may pursue with profit the biography 
herewith presented, for therein are embodied many lessons as well as incen- 
tive, and, although he "serenely sleeps in the windowless palaces of rest," 
his influence still pervades the lives of thousands, making them better and 
happier; thus, truly, with Shakespeare, ''The good that men do lives after 
them." 

Judge McCabe was born in Darke county, Ohio, July 4, 1834. A char- 
acteristic of the subject was that he usually had things go as he wished- This 
may have been an inherited trait; for about the year 1830, his father, James 
McCabe, Sr., eloped from Middletown, south of Terre Haute, Indiana, with 
Jane Lee, daughter of an old Virginia family. They went to Ohio, after they 
were married, and there the subject of this memoir was born, being one of 
five sons. While an infant his parents removed to Kosciusko county, Indi- 
ana. From there they went to Illinois and the boy that afterward became 
one of the supreme judges of Indiana plowed prairie sod with an ox team 
on the ground where Watseka now stands. Three of the sons of the stern 
Whig father ran away from home, coming to Indiana. James was one of the 
three. He went to Crawfordsville, attracted there "by the presence of rela- 
tives of his mother, the Lees. At this time he was seventeen years old, and 
here it was that he first went to school, having had no learning whatever up to 
this time. His first schooling was at a night school taught by Judge Naylor, 
one of the well known members of the bar. So sensitive was he to the taunts 
of boys, who laughed at his painful efforts to learn, that it was only the earn- 
est solicitations of Judge Naylor that kept him in school. He made his way in 
school by working on the Monon railroad as section hand. He boarded 
wherever handy, and at the age of eighteen married Serena, the daughter of 
M. M. VanCleve, with whom he boarded. The bride was only sixteen. This 
was March 24, 1853. Had the Judge lived one day longer he would have 
celebrated his fifty-eighth wedding anniversary. They began housekeeping 
on a farm seven miles from Crawfordsville. One day when work was slack, 
he went to Crawfordsville, and, impelled mainly by curiosity, attended a mur- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 707 

der trial in which the prosecutor was the great criminal lawyer, Daniel W. 
Voorhees, and the defendant's attorney was Edward Hannegan. The splen- 
did eloquence of these two distinguished orators was enough; then and there 
he kindled the ambition to be a lawyer. He never gave up that ideal. Days 
were dark many times after that and nothing but hope remained, but he lived 
to become one of the great attorneys of the state and a member of the su- 
preme court of Indiana. 

James McCabe taught school in winters and did what he could get to do 
in summers, living at Oxford and Pine Village in succession and finally be- 
ing admitted to the bar and beomiug a resident of Williamsport in i86r. 
Here indeed, for years, the days were dark. The young lawyer knew what 
it was to walk all the way to Walnut Grove to argue a cause before the squire, 
but his labors were lightened, usually by the success that he had. 

In politics Judge McCabe was a Democrat. His reason for being a 
Democrat was characteristic. He was a "Hard Shell'' Baptist, and so were 
his wife's people. He believed absolutely in the literal interpretation of the 
Bible and considered that the Bible sanctioned slavery. Therefore he allied 
himself with the Democratic party, although his father was a Whig of uncom- 
promising type. Twice was he nominated for Congress, and in a strong Re- 
publican district defeated by only narrow margins. In 1892 he was elected 
to the state supreme court for a term of six years. Although nominated for 
a second term, he was defeated with the rest of the ticket. 

Three very important opinions were handed down by Judge McCabe 
while on the bench. The most noted was that of Haggart vs. Stehlin, 137 
Indiana, 43. This was one of the noted supreme court decisions that for 
many years have been gradually cutting down the privileges of the saloon, 
the most infamous institution that society sanctions. He took advanced 
ground in this decision, going far beyond any ideas that had ever been pre- 
sented in any court in the world. The gist of the decision, which was ren- 
dered in 1898, was that a saloon may become a nuisance, may be enjoined 
and may have judgment for damages rendered against it. So far L reaching 
was this decision that it was widely commented on, not only in America but 
in Europe as well. The Literary Digest gave it considerable space. An in- 
teresting fact is that John W. Kern, the present United States senator from 
Indiana, was the saloon man's attorney. Another famous case was that in 
which the decision of the lower court sentencing Hinshaw, the preacher who 
murdered his wife, to the state prison for life, was confirmed. The evidence 
was purely circumstantial, but the opinion of Judge McCabe reads like a 
fascinating detective story- And one more famous opinion was that in which 



708 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

he repelled an attack on Indiana law that might have reduced the state to an- 
archy. Some man had tried to enjoin the holding of an election on the 
grounds that a legislative apportionment had been illegal. Judge McCabe 
showed that if such could possibly be the case, then the very argument of the 
petitioner would be illegal for the same reason and he denied the right of the 
plaintiffs to be heard on the question. These three decisions, even if sup- 
ported by none of the scores of others, would have marked Judge McCabe 
as an unusually strong lawyer. 

As a public speaker. Judge McCabe had few equals, his oratory being 
of a style that ei. anced those who heard him. His diction was perfect, his 
logic irresistible, ins illustrations well chosen, while his well modulated voice, 
graceful gestures, and charm of manner, all contributed to a most remark- 
able success in the legal and political forum. Some of his most pleasing and 
effective speeches were made extemporaneously, for his general knowledge 
was so broad and comprehensive, his grasp of a subject in all its aspects so 
quick, and his talent as a speaker so natural, that he could easily, without 
preparation, make addresses that would have been creditable to most men 
after careful preparation. 

After his retirement from the bench Judge McCabe practiced law with 
his son, tinder the firm name of McCabe & McCabe. He enjoyed a wide and 
lucrative practice and served many times as special judge. 

The death of Judge McCabe occurred on March 23, 191 1, at his beauti- 
ful home in Williamsport, Indiana, after an illness of long duration. 

Judge McCabe left, besides the faithful wife, three children, namely: 
Nancy Ellen, the wife of J. B. Gwin, of Indianapolis; Edwin F., a well known 
and successful attorney at Williamsport; and Charles M., a successful lawyer 
of Crawfordsville, of the firm name of Crane & McCabe. There are twelve 
grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Mrs. McCabe is the daughter 
of Mathias and Nancy (Nicholson) VanCleveand she was born in Ross 
county, Ohio. Mathias VanCleve was born near Shelbyville, Kentucky, in 
1 810, and he was educated mostly in his native state. He was a Baptist min- 
ister of considerable reputation, and he finally came to Indiana and estab- 
lished the family home near Crawfordsville, where they continued to reside 
for nearly a, half century. He was primarily a self-made man, and most of 
his higher learning was obtained by home study. His family consisted of six 
children, Mrs. Serena McCabe having been the third in order of birth. 

The bar of the Warren circuit court held a memorial service, at Williams- 
port on May 7, 191 1, when the last tribute of respect and honor to his mem- 
ory was paid by an immense crowd of neighbors and friends. Quite a num- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 7OQ 

ber of prominent and distinguished jurists and state officers was present. 
The Judge's desk was massed with beautiful floral decorations and all the ar- 
rangements befitted the occasion, at which former Appellate Judge Joseph M. 
Rabb presided and he spoke at length concerning Judge McCabe as a friend 
and as a lawyer. Addresses were also made by others, the principal speaker 
being William J. Bryan, the great Nebraska Commoner having been a close- 
personal friend of Judge McCabe and the two men had been active associates 
in national politics. Mr. Bryan's speech was an eloquent and complete tribute. 
He spoke of the late jurist's struggle with poverty to obtain education; of 
his indomitable energy in pursuing the law ; of his industry and perseverance in 
preparing his cases for court, relating that he would sometimes sit up all 
night to get up the decisions bearing on the case and thoroughly inform 
himself upon the case. He said that Mr. McCabe was not deceitful, that he 
did not know what deceit was, his nature being so high and noble. He spoke 
of the Judge's rulings while on the supreme bench, said they had become 
national and had been copied in England. He spoke touchingly of his 
friendship for the Judge and of his love for him, his friendship being of 
fifteen years' standing and was one of the pleasantest things of his life. He 
never needed an invitation to the home at Five Points, for he always found a 
welcome there whenever he was able to stop and see the Judge. He built his 
remarks on the four cornerstones essential to form a character like that of 
Judge McCabe's. They were God, home, society and government., Had he 
been called upon to speak of a man who did not believe in God he would not 
know what to say, and could have said but little. Such a belief was necessary 
for the building of the pure, noble, philanthropic character of Judge McCabe. 
His next cornerstone was home. For fifty-eight years the Judge had enjoyed 
and loved his home and it had been a tower of strength to him. The world 
was richer for him having lived in it and for his children having lived in it. 
The next cornerstone was society. If you would go over the Great Divide and 
cross the Rocky Mountains in the place you would be most likely to come to 
them you would look down into the Grand Canyon eight miles across and 
almost perpendicularly down a mile and you would see the narrow river that 
through the ages had been cutting its way down through the massive rocks. 
Every stream and every rain drop helped to make this river and bring about 
this result. So every deed of a noble man had its influence on succeeding 
generations, on and on down the river of time. We owe much to those who 
were before us. Our society and our government we inherit from our fathers. 
No man has a right to draw from society without giving back measure for 
measure. Mr. McCabe knew the demands of society and gave back as much as 



yiO FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

he drew from it. He chose his champions among the highest and the best in 
society and society welcomed him. The last cornerstone of his character was 
government. He did not believe in a government of force, a government forced 
upon those who do not participate in the government, but a government of the 
people and by the people. He believed that this form of government gave the 
highest form of citizenship, and gave the greatest possibility of progress to 
those who stand by their convictions. Judge McCabe stood by his principles, al- 
though living in a community where he was in the minority. It must have taken 
a strong character to have stood alone in this community, and his stand showed 
him to be such a character. Truth is always alone. The man who first 
advances a truth is called a fanatic. After a few can see as he does he is 
called an enthusiast. When all believe as he does he is called a hero. Judge 
McCabe was a man of honest and independent conviction and he stood by his 
colors, though at times it appeared that he was fighting a lone battle. To 
recapitulate, Judge McCabe was not afraid of the people, but believed in them. 
He believed in popular government. He had a big heart and purity and good- 
ness beamed from his countenance. He believed in the highest form of 
citizenship and a great government and he looked forward to a life beyond. 

The following memorial was prepared by the local bar association, the 
committee drafting the resolutions being William H. Durborow, H. D. 
Billings, Victor H. Ringer and Chester G. Rossiter; part of the memorial, 
bearing on the life of the decceased is omitted, to avoid repetition from fore-' 
going paragraphs in this sketch : 

• "From 1861 until his elevation to the supreme bench of the state, Judge 
McCabe's career as a lawyer was one of unremitting labor, crowned with 
remarkable success. By his power of oratory, he could sway a jury as few 
lawyers could. When espousing a client's cause he never rested from his 
efforts in his- behalf. He had a large, varied and widely extended practice, 
and could and did meet the most distinguished lawyers on equal terms. Dur- 
ing his term of six years on the bench, the opinions prepared by him have be- 
come masterpieces of profound learning, many of them on public questions of 
lasting benefit to the people of the state at large. But his life work is finished. 
It was well and ably done. In summing up the professional career of this 
honored and honorable gentleman, it can be truthfully said, that: 

"As an advocate he possessed a remarkable power of clear statement and 
convincing logic. As a counselor he was exact, careful and carried his re- 
searches into the remotest sources of the law. As a public orator, he swayed 
men with force of argument, and molded their ideas to coincide with his own. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 71 I 

As a judge, he was upright, masterful and added luster to the bench of a 
mighty state; therefore be it 

"Resolved by the bar of Warren Circuit Court that in the death of Judge 
James McCabe our bar has lost the guidance of its oldest and wisest member; 
with reverence we will be guided by his precept and example. That his family 
has lost a devoted and loving husband and father and they have the sympathy 
of our bar. That the state has lost a wise and able jurist, the community a 
popular and distinguished citizen. Be it further 

"Resolved, that the memorial and these resolutions be spread on record 
in the order book of the Warren circuit court, a copy thereof be furnished by 
the clerk, under his hand and the seal of the court, to the family of our de- 
ceased member, and that a copy be published in the county papers." 

As a further insight into the characcter of Judge McCabe, the following 
letter from United States Senator John W. Kern, of Indianapolis, written to 
tl 3 son of the subject of this memoir, will be of interest:- 

"I learned this morning of the death of your father, and hasten to 
express my deep sympathy and to assure you thatT am one of his many friends 
who are today mourning his many noble qualities of head and heart. 

"I had known James McCabe since the days of my early manhood, and 
my admiration for him increased as the years rolled by until it ami ■ nted to 
genuine affection. He was a man of sterling qualities. His convictions were 
positive and always expressed fearlessly, though he always manifested a rare 
spirit of charity towards those who honestly differed from him in opinion. 

"He was a just judge, whose first aim was the security of justice to the 
litigant, and to maintain at the same time the dignity of the high judicial office 
which he so long honored. 

"As a lawyer, he threw his whole soul into his work and to his great 
legal knowledge 'he added the saving grace of common sense' in such a degree 
as to make him a most formidable adversary. 

"As a citizen, he stood for the highest ideals and his voice was always 
to be heard in behalf of temperance and morality. But it was as a friend, 
true, loyal, and devoted, that he won my personal affection, so that I now 
mourn with you as a kinsman." 



ELWOOD CARLSON. 

The subject of this review is a young man of high standing to whom 
has not been denied a full measure of success, at an age when others are 
just getting a start in life's affairs. He is distinctively one of the representa- 



712 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

five citizens of his township and is widely recognized as a factor of importance 
in connection with agricultural and coal operating interests of the county of 
Warren, being a native son of the same, and here he has been content to apply 
himself to life's labors, wisely deciding that for him here existed all the 
opportunities necessary- to a successful career in a business way. 

Elwood Carlson was born on July II, 1889, on the old Carlson home- 
stead in this county, and he is still residing on the old home farm. He is the 
son of John T. and Hadda (Jones) Carlson, both natives of Sweden, where 
they grew to maturity, were educated and married and there began house- 
keeping. The father finally emigrated to America'and established the family 
home in Warren county, Indiana, then sent for his family and they joined him 
here. A fuller notice of the Carlson family will be found on another page of 
this volume. , Suffice it to say here that they have been known during the 
past half century of this locality's history as industrious, law-abiding and 
honest people, ranking with the best families of the county. 

Elwood Carlson grew to manhood in his native community and when 
but a boy he assisted with the general work on the home place, and during 
the winter months he attended the district schools, taught at the Fink school 
house, but he has principally educated himself, having always been a wide 
reader of miscellaneous subjects and a close observer. He is associated with 
his brother, Albert Carlson, in the general merchandising business at the town 
of Carbondal'e, and also operates the home farm, keeping it well improved and 
well tilled, so that it has retained its original fertility, and in connection with 
his other business affairs he engages in coal mining, operating the Carlson 
mine, which has long been a very paying proposition. He sells coal to the 
farmers and also furnishes coal under contract to Dr. W..H. Dinsmore at 
Mudlavia. He is a young man of much business ability and the future prom- 
ises much ', for him. 

Fraternally, Mr. Carlson belongs to the Improved Order of Red Men and 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Lodge No. 143, Lafayette. 



THOMAS PURDUE. 



' Shawnee township is among the best of the farming districts in Fountain 
county, but that alone does not explain the success of Thomas Purdue. For 
his farm, though naturally productive, shows clearly to even the casual 
passerby the evidences' of careful, systematic and scientific farming, and also 
the evidences that such farming pays, in the appearance of prosperity which 




THOMAS PURDUE. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 713 

surrounds the handsome home and commodious and substantial farm build- 
ings situated on the well-cared-fpr acres about them. Mr. Purdue can posi- 
tively demonstrate to any man that farming pays, when rightly conducted, and 
that the farmer's life is an independent one and offers as many opportunities 
for contentment as any other. 

Thomas Purdue was born in Centreville, Appanoose county, Iowa, on 
February 13, 1856, the son of Abraham and Margaret (Byers) Purdue. 
Three brothers, Abraham, Richard and Jackson Purdue, were the first three 
settlers in Appanoose county and cast the first ballots in that county. They 
were Democrats. Abraham Purdue was a native of Warren county, Indiana, 
and at an early age went to Iowa. Possessed with the pioneer spirit, he later 
went to Colorado, where he died. He spent his life in farming and the mer- 
cantile business. He was a man of great force of character, whose opinions 
were felt in whatever community he lived. His family consisted of six chil- 
dren, namely: Sarah, the wife of Eli Graves, a merchant of Zinc, Arkansas; 
Thomas; Mary, who married A. W.'Helms, of Shawnee township; and Mar- 
tha, Celia and Richard, deceased. 

Thomas Purdue attended the common schools of Shawnee township, 
where he came when seven years old, and has been a farmer ever since leav- 
ing school, by his keen observation and practical acumen obtaining many a 
lesson from his experiences which were lost to others more obtuse, and which 
have enabled him to make his farming" operations so profitable. He is now 
the owner of three hundred and forty acres of land, all but sixty of which is 
under cultivation. He has improved his farm and brought it in every respect 
up to the highest modern standards of farming efficiency, while the ample 
and attractive residence which he designed and built might well he taken as a 
model farm house. 

On March 26, 1880, Mr. Purdue was married to Eva Hatfield, the 
daughter of Horace Hatfield, originally from New York. To this marriage 
was born one child, Sylvia, who married Frank A. Campbell, a progressive 
young farmer of Shawnee township. She is the mother of one child, Evelyn 
Elizabeth. Mr. Purdue and his family are members of the Christian church, 
and he is active in all church affairs and strong in its support. For several 
years he has been a deacon. In politics he is independent, choosing to form 
his judgments of men and measures untrammeled by lines of party allegiance. 
He was appointed a member of the advisory board of Shawnee township. 
Fraternally, he is a Mason. Mr. Purdue is a man who depends on his own 
judgment, which has rarely failed him, but in all his successes he has never 
failed to have the welfare of others at heart, for he is a thorough believer in 



714 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

the practicability of the brotherhood of man and is always willing to help 
some weaker brother or to aid in any enterprise which promises good to the 
whole brotherhood. He and his handsome and faithful wife to whom he owes 
much of his prosperity live a life almost ideal in their pretty residence situated 
in the midst of the farm which they have given many of their efforts in order 
to bring it to its present excellent condition. 



GEORGE DICE. 



The occupation of farming, to which the subject has applied his time and 
attention since reaching his majority, is the oldest business pursuit of man- 
kind and the one in which he will ever be the most independent. Of course 
when this is said reference is made to civilized man, because hunting and 
fishing were the primitive pursuits of man before he reached the civilized 
state. Unfortunately and for some unnecessary and unexplainable reason, 
there was a time when the tiller of the soil was not regarded by some as their 
equal in social standing. But that time has past, and farmers now stand just 
as high as merchants, doctors or any other class of bread winners. In addi- 
tion, the farmer is far more independent than any of his fellow workers. ^If 
he is out of debt he can laugh at panics and periods of tight markets. Thus 
is situated the subject of this sketch. 

George Dice, one of the leading agriculturists and well known citizens of 
Van Buren township, Fountain county, is one of the worthy native sons of 
this locality, his birth having occurred in this township and county on De- 
cember 27, 1839. He is the son of George and Jane (Hopp) Dice, a well 
known and prominent pioneer family, a fuller record of whom will be found 
in the sketch of William Dice, in this volume, hence need not be repeated 
here. 

George Dice, of this sketch, grew to manhood on the old home place 
and there he worked hard when a boy, and in the winter time he attended the 
district schools of his neighborhood, receiving a fairly good education for 
those early times. When a young man he took up general farming for a 
livelihood and this has continued to occupy his time and attention to the 
present day. He has managed well and applied himself closely and prosper- 
ity has attended his efforts, until he now ranks among the leading farmers 
and stock raisers of this part of the county, and is the owner of one of our 
finest farms, which consists of seven hundred acres of well improved and 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 715 

valuable land, all under cultivation but eighty acres. He has a pleasant home 
in the midst of attractive surroundings and has a number of good outbuild- 
ings. A good grade of live stock is always to be found in his fields and 
bams, and formerly he made a specialty of raising Poland-China hogs, which, 
owing to their superior quality, always found a very ready market. He is not 
so actively engaged as formerly, but still manages his extensive farm and 
keeps a number of men employed in the regular work of the same. 

Mr. Dice was married in 1867 to Mary Brown, daughter of John 
Brown and wife. Mr. Brown is an old settler of the eastern part of this 
county, still living on his excellent farm near Newtown, Richland town- 
ship. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Dice has been without issue. 

Politically, the subject is a Democrat, but he has never been much of a 
public man and has never held office. He is a liberal contributor to the 
church. 



ALBERT CARLSON. 

The record of Albert Carlson, well known merchant at Carbondale, 
Warren county, Indiana, shows that he occupies a conspicuous place among 
the leading men of his locality and he enjoys the confidence and esteem of 
all who know him. His record demonstrates that where there is a will there 
is a way and that obstacles to success may be overcome by courage and self- 
reliance. His career, though strenuous, has been fraught with good to his 
fellow men and his example is cordially commended to the youth of the land 
whose life work is yet a matter of the future, for it shows what one may ac- 
complish while yet young in years, through persistence and rightly directed 
efforts. 

Mr. Carlson was born in 1886 in" this county, on a farm. .He is the son 
of John T. and Hadda (Jones) Carlson, his father being now a retired far- 
mer and coal operator. He was born in Sweden, emigrating to America when 
a young man; however, he had been married previously, and when he had 
made enough money he sent for his wife and two children and they joined 
him here. John T. Carlson landed in Attica, Indiana, on July 5, 1868, and 
began working on a farm near there at eighteen dollars per month. Being a 
hard worker and economical he saved enough money to purchase one hundred 
acres, which he managed well and it yielded large annual returns, so that he 
later added to it another one hundred acres, also became owner of a nice 
piece of property in Carbondale, besides his beautiful residence on Pike street 



Jl6 FOUNTAIN AND WAKREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

in Attica. His family consisted of five children, namely: Albert, of this re- 
view; Elvvood, Anna, Minnie and Lena. 

The subject first attended the Fink schools in his native township, where 
he grew to manhood on the home farm, and he finished his education at La- 
fayette, Indiana, taking a business course. All through his school period he 
worked on the home farm and about the coal mine which his father was in- 
terested in. The father and son bought out the general merchandise store 
at Carbondale about three years ago, and Albert Carlson has since been man- 
aging the same in a very able manner, with ever-growing success, building up 
a large and satisfactory business with the town and surrounding country. 
He has greatly increased the stock from time to time and his ability as a busi- 
ness man of modern ideas is marked and gives promise of future success. He 
is also associated with his brother in farming and coal operating. 

Albert Carlson was married on July 3, 1906, to Zue Berkey, daughter of 
Mrs. Lydia Berkey, her parents having come from Kansas, where Mrs. 
Carlson was born. The Berkeys have devoted their lives to agricultural pur- 
suits. Three children have been born to Albert Carlson and wife, namely: 
Fern, Ollie and Vivian. 

Fraternally, the subject belongs to the Improved Order of Red Men, 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, Lodge No. 143, at Lafayette. v 



M. W. SNODDY. 



The character of a community is determined in a large measure by the 
lives of a comparatively few of its members. If its moral and intellectual 
status be good, if in a social way it is a pleasant place in which to reside, if 
its reputation for the integrity of its citizens has extended into other localities, 
it will be found that the standards set by the leading men have been high and 
their influence such as to mold their characters and shape the lives of those 
with whom they mingle. In placing the subject of this sketch in the ranks of 
such men, justice is rendered a biographical fact universally recognized 
throughout Fountain and adjoining counties by those at all familiar with 
his history. Although a quiet and unassuming man, with no ambition for 
public leadership, he has contributed much to the material advancement of 
the community, while his admirable qualities of head and heart and the 
straightforward, upright course of his daily life have tended in no small de- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. JXJ 

gree to the moral standing of the circles in which he moves and have given 
him a reputation for integrity and correct conduct. 

M. W. Snoddy, proprietor of one of the hest known and must popular 
flouring mills in this locality, and a representative of one of our best old fam- 
ilies, was born in Fountain county, Indiana, on February 22, 1858. He is the 
son of Samuel I. and Susan (Koons) Snoddy, the father born in Pennsyl- 
vania in 1828, and the mother was also born in that state. There they grew 
to maturity, received such education as the early schools afforded and there 
they were married. They came overland in 1849 to Fountain county, In- 
diana. The older Snoddy first worked in the Parke county mill at Rockport, 
where he remained three years, then moved to Wabash township, Fountain 
county, where he purchased what is now known as the Snoddy mills, there 
being on the place he procured at that time a saw-mill and a corn crusher. 
These he operated for seven years, when his plant was all washed away dur- 
ing high water. He later rebuilt the saw-mill, which he continued to conduct 
until 1869, this having been the best known saw-mill in this part of the state 
and here a vast amount of hardwood timber was converted into lumber. Avail- 
able timber becoming scarce and there arising need of a flouring mill in this 
vicinity, Mr. Snoddy built the present flouring mill in 1869, which he con- 
tinued to run successfully until 1887, when his two sons bought out his in- 
terests and a year later they remodeled the mill and installed up-to-date ma- 
chinery, with a capacity of fifty barrels per day, which was a good record for 
a water-power mill. The quality of flour was the finest, it having always been 
universally agreed that the best flour is obtained from a water-mill. In 1898 
M. W. Snoddy, of this sketch, purchased the interest of his brother and since 
that time has operated the mill alone, having enjoyed an excellent patronage, 
running the business under his own name. He understands thoroughly every 
phase of the milling business, having grown up in the same, for when but a 
boy he began assisting his father in the old mill during the months that he 
was not attending the public schools in his district. 

M. W. Snoddy was married in 1885 to Eliza Jane Holder, daughter of 
William Holder, a native of Kentucky, from which state he came to Indiana, 
locating in Fountain county, where he lived with his children, but he was not 
among the old settlers here. To the subject and wife four children have been 
born, namely: Walter O., who lives at home and is assisting his father in the 
mill; Harry M. was next in order of birth; Mont is deceased; Mary married 
Benjamin Merriman, a railroad man. 

Politically, Mr. Snoddy is a Republican and, while he takes more or less 
interest in public affairs, he has never been an office seeker. 



718 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Mr. Snodcly has made what he has by hard work and good management. 
In August, 1906, he put in a substantial cement dam across Cole creek on 
which his mill is located. The dam is one hundred and twenty-five feet wide 
and was erected at a cost of three thousand and eight hundred dollars, besides 
the labor. He now has a most desirable and valuable property. 



ANDREW P. CARLSON. 

To a great extent the prosperity of the agricultural sections of our great 
country is due to the honest industry, the sturdy perseverance and the wise 
economy which so prominently characterizes the foreign element, both those 
who have come direct from the European nations and their American-born 
children. All will agree, after so much as a cursory glance over our forty- 
eight states, that they have entered very largely into our population. By 
comparison with their "old country" surroundings, these people have readily 
recognized the fact that in the United States lie the greatest opportunities 
for the man of energy and ambition. Because of this many have broken the 
ties of home and native land and have entered earnestly upon the task of 
gaining in the new world a home and a competence. Among this class was 
the late Andrew P. Carlson, of Warren township, Warren county, Indiana, 
who was not disappointed in the fruition of his hopes and who, because of the 
splendid life he lived here, earned the respect and esteem of all who knew him. 

Andrew P. Carlson was born in Smoland, Sweden, and there received his 
education. In young manhood he emigrated to the United States, 1865 being 
the year of his arrival, and he came direct to Attica, Indiana, where a brother, 
Edward, was living. This brother was a mechanic and Andrew, who had 
worked some at the blacksmith trade in his old country home, was employed 
in a similar manner here for a time. Later he secured work on a farm. He 
was industrious and economical and he thus managed to save enough money 
with which to buy one hundred and twenty acres of land, where the present 
home now stands, it being located about two and a half miles north of Attica, 
To this he later added by purchase forty acres, and still later eighty acres 
more, making altogether one of the best farms in this section of Warren 
county. It is all good farm land and has been maintained at a high standard 
of excellence, its fertility never having been impaired by neglect or careless in- 
attention to the proper rotation of crops. Mr. Carlson was a careful and in- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 7IO. 

dustrious farmer and was not slow to adopt the best methods of conducting 
his operations, so that he was enabled to reap abundant returns for his labor. 

Mr. Carlson was united in marriage to Lottie Carlson, and to them have 
been born the following children : Emil, at home ; Otto ; Clint, who is en- 
gaged with Emil in operating a threshing machine, having a traction engine 
and all other necessary adjuncts to that line of work; he married Cora Smith, 
who is now deceased, and they had three children, Earl, Florence and Francis ; 
Elmer is at home, as are Axel and Elsie. 

Politically, Mr. Carlson was a stanch adherent of the Republican party, 
to which he gave earnest support. His religious membership was with the 
Lutheran church, the church of his family in Sweden. Mr. Carlson always 
manifested excellent business judgment and was an indefatigable worker, 
consequently he made a success of his life work and at the same time won 
and held the confidence and good will of a host of warm personal friends. 
The home ties were strong with him and he reared a family to respectable 
positions in life. 



ISAAC A. ROSEBERRY, M. D. 

Among the successful and well known physicians of Warren county 
I. A. Roseberry is deserving of special notice in this connection, for here he 
has labored successfully for the sick and afflicted and his name is a household 
word throughout the locality which has long been the scene of his activities, 
although he hails from the old Buckeye state, which has sent so many of its 
substantial citizens into the Wabash country during the past three-quarters of 
a century, and, like most of them, the subject has manifested an abiding in- 
terest in the growth and general welfare of the same along all lines. He re- 
sides at the town of Independence. 

Dr. Roseberry was born in Warren county, Ohio, near the city of Leb- 
anon, on May 7, 1832, and he is the son of Abraham and Mary Ann (Stew- 
art) Roseberry. The father was a native of the Old Dominion, born and 
reared in Berkshire county, Virginia, and he came to Ohio when a young 
man and took up farming and there became well established. He reared a 
family of eleven children, of whom Dr. I. A., of this review, was the second in 
order of birth. 

Dr. Roseberry worked with his grandfather on the farm during the 
summer months, and in the winter time he attended the district schools, later 
attending school at Franklin, Indiana, then went to College Hill for two 



720 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

terms. He read medicine for some time with his family doctor and also at 
Waynesville, Ohio, and he attended lectures at Starling Medical College, at 
Columbus, Ohio, later at the Miami Medical College, at Cincinnati. He went 
to Centerville, Indiana, in i 54 and taught school one winter. He came to 
Independence in 1855, arriving here on April 25th, and he at once went into a 
partnership in the practice of his profession with Dr. J. O. Wade, which 
lasted three years. He soon had a large practice which has continued to 
grow from year to year until he became one of the busiest and most successful 
physicians of this locality. ; 

Dr. Roseberry was married in 1859 to Martha J. Tebbs, of Williams- 
port. He later returned to Ohio and remained some time in both Dayton and 
Waynesville, then returned to Independence, Indiana, in 1878, and has been 
here continuously -to the present time. He was married a second time in 
1908 to Margaret Ambler Smith. 

The Doctor belongs to the county and state medical societies and the 
American Medical Association. Although he is now eighty-one years of 
age, he is one of the best preserved men in the county and looks many years 
younger. He is a pleasant gendeman in his everyday life, hospitable, kindly 
and obliging and a favorite with all who know him. 



ROBERT J. MILLER. 

Robert J. Miller, a prominent citizen, and farmer of Jackson township, 
comes of sterling old Revolutionary stock and is entitled to worthy mention 
among the leading citizens of the county of which he has long been an hon- 
ored resident. His parents, Flemon and Crilda (Gooding) Miller, were na- 
tives of Kentucky and Illinois, respectively. The father grew to maturity 
in the state of his birth and when a young man learned the trade of weaving 
and spinning, in addition to which he also became a proficient distiller. He 
w r as for some years superintendent of the weaving and bagging works in the 
Louisiana penitentiary at Baton Rouge and achieved an enviable reputation 
as an expert worker and efficient manager. At the age of t went)' -five he came 
north and located in Parke county, Indiana, where he was engaged for some 
time in the manufacture of ropes. Disposing of his interests in that part of 
the state, he moved to Fountain county, where, in addition to farming, he 
operated a mill, later becoming the owner of three hundred acres of fine land 
in Jackson township, which he devoted largely to stock raising and which Ids 
son, Robert J., now owns. He was a very active and useful man, filled a large 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. "]2\ 

place in the community and his death, which occurred in 1877, at the age of 
fifty-nine years, was felt as a personal loss by a large circle of neighbors and 
friends. Robert Miller, father of Flemon, was a veteran of the war for in- 
dependence and is said to have borne a distinguished part throughout the 
greater part of that historic struggle. Crilda Gooding, wife of Flemon Mil- 
ler, was a daughter of Isaac Gooding, who also served in the war of the 
Revolution and was one of the early settlers of Fountain county. He entered 
land near the village of Wallace where he improved a farm on which he spent 
the remainder of his days, dying a number of years ago at an advanced age. 
Mrs. Miller departed this life in 1891, aged seventy-five years, having borne 
her husband children as follows: Robert J., of this review; Allen, William 
H., George, Flemon, Daniel, Alfred; Elizabeth, wife of Alfred Livengood, 
and Mary, who married James McGivin, of which family the second, third, 
fourth and fifth in order of birth are deceased. 

Robert J. Miller, to a brief review of whose career the reader's attention 
is respectfully invited in the following lines, is a' native of Indiana, bom in 
Park, county on August 20th of the year 1848. Removing with his parents 
when quite young to Fountain county, he was reared at the family home in 
Jackson township ami at intervals during the years of his childhood and 
youth attended the schools of the neighborhood until acquiring a tolerably 
thorough knowledge of the branches constituting the course of study. Ar- 
riving at manhood's estate, he farmed for three years and then entered a 
general store at Waveland, Parke county, where he remained two years, dur- 
ing which time he became familiar with merchandising and earned the repu- 
tation of a capable and popular salesman. Resigning his position at the lat- 
ter place, he spent one year in a similar capacity in Bloomington and then 
returned to Fountain county, where he has since lived and prospered as a 
tiller of the soil, owning at this time a splendid farm of three hundred 
seventy-six acres in Jackson township, all under cultivation, highly improved 
and bearing every evidence of capable management. In addition to agricul- 
ture and stock raising, Mr. Miller is connected with various enterprises of a 
business nature, including among others the Amanda May Milling and Min- 
ing Company, of Eagle county, Colorado, of which he is president, besides 
being interested in other mining properties in the vicinity. During the past 
twelve years he has spent his summers in Eagle county and his interests 
there have proved quite remunerative. His mines are in a very rich mineral 
district and, while thus far fully meeting his expectations and justifying the 
expense of development, he looks for larger and much more remunerative 
returns from them in the future than in the past. 

(46) 



*J22 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Mr. Miller has always taken an active part in political affairs and for a 
number of years has been one of the influential Democrat.-, of Fountain county. 
In recognition of services rendered his party he was elected in November, 
189S, sheriff of the county, which office he held until January, T903, and in 
the discharge of the duties of which he earned an honorable reputation as a 
capable, obliging and exceedingly popular public servant. Wide awake, enter- 
prising and thoroughly up-to-date, he keeps in touch with the best thought of 
the day in the matter of agriculture, cultivates his land after the most ap- 
proved methods and, believing in utilizing his means for worthy objects, he 
has provided for his family one of the finest rural homes in Fountain county 
' and equipped it throughout with modern improvements and conveniences. In 
his fraternal relations he holds membership with the Masonic, Odd Fellow 
and Pythian orders, having filled all the chairs in the local lodges of the two 
former organizations. He is also interested in private, charitable and benevo- 
lent enterprises, being liberal to those in distress and never turning a deaf ear 
to the worthy poor. 

Mr. Miller, on November 4, 1869, was united in the bonds of wedlock 
to Lear Myers, daughter of Eli and Susanna (Darr) Myers, of North Caro- 
lina, to which union eight children have been born, namely : Julius, who mar- 
ried Rena Swain, is a prosperous farmer of Cain township; Amanda is the 
wife of Alexander Starnes, a resident of that township also; Flemon, de- 
ceased; William A., a farmer of Cain township, his wife having formerly 
been Anna Kenyon: Perry Franklin, deceased; May, now Mrs. John Lind- 
quist: Thomas H., who married Leona Alexander, and Robert L., who mar- 
ried Lena Banty. The living members of the family are well settled in life, 
prosperous and highly esteemed in their respective communities, all being 
residents of Fountain county. Mr. and Mrs. Miller are members of the Christ- 
ian church, to which religious body several of their children also belong. Few 
men in Jackson township are as well known as the subject. In all the relations 
of life he stands above reproach, his dealings have ever been honorable and to 
a marked degree he commands the respect of his neighbors and fellow citizens. 



WILLIAM WALLACE ROBB. 

But few men in Warren county, Indiana, have witnessed the phenom- 
enal changes that have taken place within the limits of the county within 
the past seventy-five years and still live to narrate their experiences from the 
early pioneer days up to the present hour of an advanced civilization, as 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 723 

docs William Wallace Robb, the venerable subject of this biographical men- 
tion, and now a highly respected retired farmer in Washington township. 

Mr. Robb, who owns a fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres, sit- 
uated about one and one-quarter miles west of Williamsport, was bom on 
June 20, 1837, and is the son of William and Abi (Higginbotham) Robb. The 
father was a native of Mercer county, Pennsylvania, and the mother of 
Brown county, Ohio. They came to Fountain county, Indiana, in 1829, re- 
maining there one year, and then came to Warren county, locating three-quar- 
ters of a mile west of Williamsport, where the Bush farm is located. On 
that farm the subject of this sketch was born, in a pioneer log cabin and amid 
primitive surroundings. He secured his education in the schools of that 
period, his vacation periods and morning and evening hours being spent in 
work on the farm. He engaged for a time in teaching school in this county, 
and then for a short period was engaged in the general mercantile business, 
but eventually he returned to agriculture as his permanent vocation. He started 
out on a comparatively modest scale, the first piece of land which he bought, 
and which is now a part of the homestead, comprising seventy acres. To this 
he added ninety acres and then one hundred acres, which latter he subse- 
quently gave to his daughter, Mrs. Lona Shannon. Mr. Robb during his 
active years was a hard-working, energetic and persistent worker, leaving no 
stone unturned in his efforts to create a good home. In this effort he was 
eminently successful and he was long considered one of the leading farmers 
in Washington township. Mr. and Mrs. Robb, after many years of hard, 
unremitting toil, were enabled to relinquish the labors of the farm to other 
and younger hands and are now living' in honorable retirement] 

On November 8, 1862, Mr. Robb was united in marriage with Mary C. 
French, the daughter of Samuel and Mary C. (Bowlus) French, and to them 
were born two children, Lona and Henry H. Lona is the widow of John A. 
Shannon, who met his death in a railroad accident near Fowler. They had two 
children, Rollin Robb and Rainey Harper. Samuel French was a native of 
Vermillion county, Indiana, and his wife of Hagerstown, Maryland. He was 
educated in Vermillion county, and followed the vocation of farming and stock- 
raising. He took premiums on stock shipped to Chicago and was an up-to- 
date man. He was self made, starting with nothing, and at the time of his 
death he was the owner of six hundred acres of land. He married Mary C. 
Bowlus, and their children were as follows: Louis, a farmer of Fountain 
county, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this work; Mary Cleantha, wife of 
the subject; Henry S., who died on December 23, 1900. Samuel French 



724 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

moved to Warren county when a young man and spent his life here, dying on 
May 27, 1887, at the age of sixty-four years. She was a member of the 
Christian church. 

Politically, Mr. Robb has been a life-long supporter of the Democratic 
party and, though advanced in years, he still takes a live interest in public 
affairs. Mr. and Mrs. Robb's religious membership is with the Christian 
church, to which they have belonged for fifty years. He early established a 
reputation for industry, honesty, integrity, prudence and judgment, such as 
few attain.' His common sense and foresight, together with the traits above 
enumerated, enabled him to establish a career highly successful in all its parts. 
He accumulated wealth in an honorable way and dealt with his fellow men 
in a manner that always won for him their high regard and confidence. 



PAYTON MELTON. 

The subject of this sketch is another of the old soldiers whom it gives 
the historian- the greatest pleasure to place on record. This should be done 
with all our honored veterans of the Civil war before it is too late to get the 
full particulars from their own lips. Their sacrifices were too great not to 
deserve ample mention in the pages of history. It meant a great deal to quit 
all pursuits and go away to the war, with the chances against him of ever 
coming back, or if he came back to do so with shattered health for the re- 
mainder of his life or in a crippled condition. But such were the chances 
taken willingly by Payton Melton; in fact, he seemed to enjoy taking chances 
to save the old flag from treason. Let us learn a little more about this gallant 
old soldier and retired farmer, of the village of Independence, Warren 
county, where he has spent his long and useful life; however, most of it has 
been lived in the country near here, but he has never cared to leave his native 
county for an abode elsewhere. 

Mr. Melton was born in Adams township, this county, December 19, 
1839, and is the son of Stephen and Eleanor (Easterling) Melton. His 
father was born in Virginia, where he spent his earlier days and from the Old 
Dominion he removed to Warren county, Ohio, where he maintained his 
home until 1826, then came to Warren county, Indiana, locating in Adams 
township, where he entered three hundred and twenty acres from the govern- 
ment, where the subject of this sketch was born. He was a hard worker and 
a good manager and in due course of time he had a good farm under cultiva- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 725 

tion and in his day was one of the leading fanners of this locality, and here 
he spent the rest of his life, his widow surviving him some time. Stephen 
Melton served as a private in Capt. Timothy Dalton's company, Seventy- 
eighth Regiment of Virginia militia, in the war of 1812. He and his wife 
were the parents of nine children, only two of whom are nuw living, Payton, 
of this review, and Mrs. Melissa Gibson. , 

Payton Melton was educated in the common schools and worked pn the 
farm during his school days. He was married on February 20, 1873, to Mary 
James, and to this union three children have been born, two of whom are de- 
ceased; Olive married Frank May, and they have one child, Zue, who is at- 
tending school. Mr. Melton was married a second time, his last wife being 
Mary Farmer, nee McKenzie. 

Mr. Melton enlisted on August 4, 1862, in Company I, Seventy.second 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry, under Captain'Hill, and he served three years in 
the Army of the Cumberland, seeing considerable hard service and participat- 
ing in numerous hard-fought engagements, in all of which he conducted him- 
self as a gallant and loyal American soldier. He is a member of Ihe Kenesaw 
Post, Grand Army of the Republic. His family belongs to the Quaker church. 



JOHN G. HE1SCHMAN. 

The most elaborate history is necessarily an abridgement, the historian 
being compelled to select his facts and materials from a multitude of details. 
So in every life of honor and usefulness the biographer finds no dearth of 
incidents, and in summing up the career of any man the writer needs touch 
only the most salient points, giving only the keynote of the character, but 
eliminating much that is superfluous. Consequently, in calling the reader's at- 
tention to the life record of the worthy gentleman whose name heads this 
paragraph no attempt shall be made to recount all the important acts in his 
useful life, nor recite every interesting incident in his career, for it is deemed 
that only a few of them will suffice to show him to be eminently worthy of a 
place in this volume along with his fellows of high standing and recognized 
worth. 

John G. Heischman, well known general merchant at Independence, 
Warren county, Indiana, was born June 23, i860, in Tippecanoe county, 
this state. He is the son of Christian and Catherine (Bierlein) Heischman. 

The father of the subject was born in Germany in 1820 and there he 



726 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

spent his earlier days, and there he received a good education in the common 
schools. When a young man he determined to cast his lot with Americans 
and accordingly set sail for our shores, after he had served his required time 
as a soldier in the German army. In due course of time he became very well 
established in America through hard and persistent work, and here he was 
married. Only one child was born to Christian and Catherine (Bierlein) 
Heischman — John G., of this sketch. 

Mr. Heischman, of this review, grew to manhood in Tippecanoe county 
and there he received his education in the common schools, working on the 
farm during his school period, but he seemed to have a natural bent for a 
business career rather than for farming, so he took up merchandising, buying 
his present store in Independence twenty-three years ago. He was successful 
from the start and has enjoyed a large and lucrative patronage all these years, 
always carrying a large and carefully selected stock of general merchandise 
which he has sold at reasonable prices, and his popular and widely known 
store is the largest of its kind in Warren county. He has accumulated a com- 
petency and is one of the substantial and representative citizens of the lower 
part of the county. 

Mr. Heischman was married in 1884 to Caroline Hechtel, the daughter 
of Christian and Margaret (Schaff) Hechtel. They were natives of Bavaria, 
where they lived and died. Mrs. Heischman is the youngest of nine children. 
She was born in Bavaria on July 12, 1863, and came to America in 1881, 
living in New York three years. 

Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Heischman: Margaret, 
who is the wife of Eldo Michael, has one son, Maiden; Pauline, second child 
of the subject, is at home ; George, Francis and May are deceased. 

Fraternally, Mr. Heischman is a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and the Improved Order of Red Men, and in religious matters 
he belongs to the Lutheran church and Mrs. Heischman to the Christian 
church. Politically, he is a Democrat, and is influential and active in upbuild- 
ing his town and community. 



WALTER BRUTUS. 

Prominent among the younger generation of farmers who have contrib- 
uted to the material prosperity of Warren county is the well known and en- 
terprising gentleman whose name appears at the head of this sketch. Walter 
Brutus is a native of Warren county, and the older of two children, whose 



FOUNTAIN AND WAUKEN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 727 

parents, Henry and Clara (May) Brutus, have been life-long residents of this 
part of the state and who now live in the township of Warren, where the 
father is a well-to-do farmer and large land owner. The subject was born in 
the above township on the place where he now resides on December 13, 1886. 
His early years were spent amid the active duties which are the necessary ac- 
companiment of rural life, and while still a youth he learned the meaning of 
hard work and how to place a proper value upon the same. During the fall and 
winter months he attended the old Bunker Hill school in Warren township, 
where he laid the foundation of an education which was subsequently com- 
pleted in the Northern Indiana Normal University at Valparaiso, where he 
took the full classical course and earned an honorable reputation as a student. 

Mr. Brutus is not of the large and rather narrow minded class that be- 
lieves intellectual training to be inimical to farm labor. On the contrary his 
idea, which is the correct one, is that education should better fit one for the 
proper cultivation of the soil and that the more the mind is trained the greater 
the agriculturist appreciates the honor and dignity of this the noblest calling 
in which mankind ever engaged. At one time he contemplated engaging in 
educational work, and to this end took the necessary examination and secured 
a teacher's license, but his services being required on the farm he did not 
carry his intention into effect. On leaving the university Mr. Brutus returned 
home and took charge of the family homestead, a splendid farm of two hun- 
dred and sixty acres, which he has since managed with marked success and of 
which he and his father are joint proprietors. Without invidious comparison 
it may be safely asserted that the above farm is one of the finest and best im- 
proved in Warren township and among the most valuable in the county. No 
reasonable means have been spared in its development and in making it, in all 
the term implies, a beautiful and attractive rural home. 

As a farmer, fully abreast of the times and in close touch with agricul- 
tural science as now taught in the leading colleges and universities of the 
country, Mr. Brutus stands in the front rank and his career thus far presents 
a series of successes which give him prestige as a master of his calling and be- 
speak for him a bright and prosperous future. Being still young and in the 
prime of vigorous physical and mental manhood, he bids fair to rise to an 
enviable place among his contemporaries, not only as a leading agriculturist, 
but also as an intelligent, wide-awake citizen who takes broad views of men 
and affairs. 

Mr. Brutus is a married man and the head of a happy household, the 
presiding spirit of which is the lady who now so worthily bears his name and 



728 FOUNTAIN AND WARKEN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

who so efficiently co-operates with him in the promotion of their mutual in- 
terests and welfare. Mrs. Brutus was formerly Clara McFerren, daughter 
of William and Ella (Dropper) McFerren, of Warren county, the marriage 
being blessed with three children, Nellie, Tiny and Lela, all bright and in- 
teresting children and adding light and joy to the home circle. The subject 
and wife are respected members of the United Brethren church and stand 
high in the esteem of their manv neighbors and friends. 



H. C. RANDOLPH. 

The best farmers of the present day do not confine their whole time and 
attention to the cultivation of the soil, but vary their operations by raising 
stock of the better grades for the market and for sale to other farmers. The 
rearing of fancy stock, or of stock for the market only, may be made very 
profitable by the farmer who will take the time to study the stock question as it 
deserves. It is easy to obtain from the government the reports of the experts 
whose business it is to investigate every phase of the stock question, with un- 
limited means at hand to experiment with. The results of these experiments 
should be known to every farmer. It would be worth a great deal to him, for 
such experiments amount to what is the same as his own experiments through 
many years and with the expenditure of a large sum of money. But many 
farmers and stock raisers have grown up in the rearing of stock and know as 
much or more than the experts. One of these farmers is H. C. Randolph, who 
for many decades has been regarded as one of the leading agriculturists and 
stock men of Fountain county, where his long, honorable life has been spent. 

Mr. Randolph was born on Silver Island, Fulton township, Fountain 
county, Indiana, May 20, 1838, and here he has been pleased to spend his long 
and useful life, believing that for him "home is best," according to the old 
saying. He is the son of Aaron and Charlotte (Lunger) Randolph, the father 
a native of New Jersey. A fuller mention of this prominent old family is to 
be found on other pages in this work. 

H. C. Randolph was reared .on the home farm and he knew what hard 
work meant when he was a boy. He received what education he could in the 
old-fashioned schools of his district. He began following farming early in 
life and later took up stock buying and selling, which he has followed ever 
since in connection with farming and other lines of endeavor. . He has also 
bought and sold much grain from time to time. He built the scales at Sil- 






^ 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 720, 

verwood, and there he bought grain for a period of forty years, also con- 
tinued buying live stock, becoming one of the most widely known and suc- 
cessful grain and stock men in this section of the state. He at one time made 
a specialty of raising graded hogs and short horn cattle, lie has prospered in 
all the lines to which he has directed his attention. He has become the owner 
of four hundred acres of rich, valuable land, on which he has made all the 
improvements. Half of his land lies in Parke county and the other two hun- 
dred acres constitute his home place on Silver Island. Here may be found a 
large, pleasant home and convenient outbuildings. Everything about the 
place denotes thrift and prosperity and that a gentleman of excellent taste has 
its management in hand. His land is nearly all tillable. He is vice-president 
of the First National Bank at Cayuga, and is a director in the same. 

Mr. Randolph was married on October 18, i860, to Clara O. Cook, 
daughter of Barney and Hannah (Osborn) Cook, both natives of Xew York, 
and in that state the father's death occurred, the mother dying in Indiana. 
Seven children have been born to the subject and wife, namely : Harry lives in 
McPherson county, Kansas; Fred is farming in Fountain count)-. Indiana; 
Charles lives in Cayuga; John is at home; Carl is farming in Parke county; 
Maggie married Fred Burton, a merchant of Cayuga; Carrie married Ira 
Dalrymple, superintendent of coal works near Birmingham, Alabama. 

Politically, Mr. Randolph is a Republican, and is proud of the fact that 
he cast his first vote for Lincoln. He is a fine type of the self made man. His 
career has been without a stain and he is popular. 



WILLIAM C. SMITH. 

It is with a great degree of satisfaction to the biographer when he averts 
to the record of one who has made the rough path of life smooth by his 
untiring perseverance, has attained success in any vocation requiring definite- 
ness of purpose and determined action. Such a life, whether it be one of 
calm, consecutive endeavor, or of sudden meteoric accomplishment, must 
abound both in lesson and incentive and prove a guide to the young men 
whose fortunes are still matters for the future to determine. For many dec- 
ades the late William C. Smith directed his efforts toward the goal of suc- 
cess in .Warren county and by patient continuance won, not only material 
prosperity but the confidence and esteem of all classes and set a worthy 
example to the rising generation, and his name is eminently entitled to con- 
spicuous mention in the histories of the far-famed Wabash country. He was 



730 FOUNTAIN AND WAKKEN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

one of the most distinguished native sons of. this county and here he was con- 
tent to spend his long, useful and industrious life, taking a leading part in the 
general development and progress of the same from the pioneer epoch to the 
present time, and no man took greater pride in seing his native community 
grow than did he. 

William C. Smith was born in Medina township, Warren county, In- 
diana, April 22, 1832, and died in Williamsport, this county, October 1, 191 1. 
About 1863 he came to Williamsport and took up his home with Mrs. Mar- 
garet Sturgeon, who was conducting a hotel here. After she died he took 
up his home with Mr. and Mrs. Stephenson, a daughter of the former lady, 
at whose home he passed away, after a long residence in the two families of 
about forty-five years. 

It is only just and due the deceased that the biographer take the reader 
back to the boyhood days of the subject of this memoir, that the strong charac- 
teristics of this line character may be more fully understood. We find a boy in 
his teens, trudging along the dusty highway on a summer's evening, clad in a 
pair of overalls, wearing an old-fashioned straw hat with a hole in the top. 
This was William C. Smith, the boy, wending his way from his mother's 
house to that of his uncle, Edward S. Coats, in Independence, where his sis- 
ter, Hester, was already making her home, as they were orphans, the father 
having died some time previous to this incident in his life. This was William 
C. Smith starting on his long business career, which was to be crowned with 
success in after years. This was the boy, yet unmatured, but with a foresight 
of greater things. This was the boy that became the central figure in Warren 
county's financial affairs. 

When he arrived at Independence on this eventful Sunday evening, his 
uncle, a kind-hearted man, took him in and gave him employment in his store, 
where he remained until the death of his uncle, which occurred in 1852. With 
the knowledge he had gained of the mercantile business while with his uncle, 
it was easy for him to secure like employment elsewhere, and he secured a 
position in the same town with J. A. Ryan, for whom he worked about two 
years. Prior to his engaging in the mercantile business, he went to Lafayette, 
where he attended a business college, and made his home with Martin L. 
Pierce, then president of the First National Bank, who was always afterwards 
a very warm friend of Mr. Smith's. Then he returned to Independence and 
formed a partnership with Mr. Ryan and for two years conducted the busi- 
ness under a firm name until reverses came, and the firm was forced to make 
an assignment, which left young Mr. Smith worse off than nothing — no 
means and badly in debt, but this failure nor this sad state of affairs did not 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 73 1 

for one moment daunt his courage, but made him more, determined. He saw 
the light at the top of the ladder of success, and with a renewed effort lie 
started to climb to the top. The next two years was spent by him in collecting 
the outstanding debts due the firm. This gave the young financier a new ex- 
perience, and by his diligent and persistent work he led others to look upon 
him as the coming man of the county, and he was employed as a collector of 
delinquent taxes. Later he worked on a farm as a laborer, to the entire satis- 
faction of Laban Wa3'mire, by whom he was employed, and afterward owned 
the farm upon which he worked as a hired man. 

Mr. Smith was above the average individual, who, having been born 
poor, never rises above a nominal standard. He made good use of his talents. 
Being born in the county when it was in its incipiency, he grew with and 
kept pace with its steady progress and development. He never allowed op- 
portunity to turn from his door; he grappled with the knotty problems of 
life, both political and financial, and solved them to his own satisfaction. He 
was strong mentally and possessed a keen foresight. Financially, he was suc- 
cessful, because he adhered to the adage that "care for the pennies and by 
and by they'll make dollars," which is attested by his vast accumulations and 
his large holdings of realty. Morally, he stood out as an example worthy of 
emulation. He despised sham, hated a liar and was radically against any- 
thing that was in league with vice or crime in any form whatsoever. He, 
like all human beings, had his peculiarities, but they were greatly counter- 
balanced by his many good and commendable traits. In a way he was liberal 
in mind, thought and purpose. Charity to him was not in wasting words, but 
in doing and giving substantial aid. Along this line he took under advise- 
ment the real necessity of such charity, and if in his judgment the party asking 
seemed worthy, he never turned him away empty handed. Many men in War- 
ren county today owe their position and their financial success to his chari- 
table hand and his timely advice and counsel. 

In the year 1859 M r - Smith served in the House of Representatives as a 
clerk, which position he secured through the influence of Hon. George D. 
Wagner, who afterward became a distinguished general in the Civil war. In 
the year i860 the subject entered the field of politics and became a candidate 
before the Republican voting convention of Warren county for the office of 
county auditor. He was then a very young man, inexperienced in politics, 
without influential friends and comparatively unknown over the county gen- 
erally. He had recently met with financial reverses in business and was with- 
out means to conduct an expensive campaign. Warren county was then, as 
now, overwhelmingly Republican and the party nomination was equivalent to 



732 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

election. His competitor was a popular gentleman who had served as deputy 
auditor for four years; was well acquainted all over the county and had the 
support of many of its influential citizens. Yet Mr. Smith made such an 
energetic campaign and created so favorable an impression that he came 
within four votes of the nomination. 

At the outbreak of the war between the states Mr. Smith raised a 
company of volunteers for the Union, but the supply of soldiers at that time 
far exceeded the demand and the company was refused, the state's quota of 
troops being then already filled. 

In 1862 Mr. , Smith became a candidate for clerk of the circuit court 
and the favorable impression he had made and the friends he had won in his 
previous campaign for auditor easily gave him the nomination. He was 
elected to this office in the fall of that year, and assumed its duties in June, 
1863. He filled this responsible office for eight years, with great credit to 
himself and satisfaction to all who had business relations with the office. And 
though he had no experience or knowledge of the duties of this office when 
he entered upon the same, his natural quickness and ability soon enabled him 
to master all its rl tails and the county never had a more efficient and capa- 
ble public officer. After leaving the clerk's office Mr. Smith was very prom- 
inent and active in the business life of Warren count)-. His ability as a 
financier was of the very highest order and not only enabled him to acquire a 
large fortune, but was helpful to a great many others, to whom he furnished 
capital to carry on their enterprises ami whom he aided by his advice and 
counsel. 

In 1889 Mr. Smith, together with the late James H. Keys, Judge Joseph 
M. Rabb and others, organized the Warren County Bank of Williamsport, 
and the success that has marked the career of this institution was a source of 
great pride and satisfaction to him and his sagacity and wisdom in the con- 
duct of its affairs contributed much to its success. 

Mr. Smith never enjoyed robust health, but what he lacked in strength 
he made up in energy. His whole life was a battle with disease and infirmity, 
but his indomitable will and courage repeatedly held the grim monster at 
bay and made him retreat time and again, but finally he was forced to yield 
when lacking but a few months of attaining his four score years. 

Mr. Smith was a strong and positive character; he had a bright mind, a 
quick intelligence and was a keen judge of human nature. He despised hypoc- 
risy, sham and fraud. He was always true to his convictions and honest and 
fearless in expressing them in his friendships. He was truth and loyalty 
itself and will long be missed and mourned by a wide circle of devoted friends. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 733 

ABRAHAM CLAW SON. 

Abraham Clawson, retired farmer and veteran of the great Civil war, is 
one of the older native citizens of Fountain county, having been born in 
Davis township on the 4th day of February, 1836. His parents, Timothy and 
Mary (Ives) Clawson, natives of Ohio and Lndiana, respectively, reared a 
family of ten children and were among the well known and highly esteemed 
residents of the community where they passed the greater part of their lives. 
Timothy Clawson came to Indiana when nineteen years old and by occupa- 
tion was a farmer. He was a man of excellent parts and high moral standing, 
a successful tiller of the soil and his influence was exerted for the good of his 
neighbors and fellow citizens. 

Abraham Clawson was born February 4, 1836, and grew up amid the 
general atmosphere and wholesome influence of rural life. In youth he was 
given the best educational advantages obtainable and for a number of years 
attended the schools of Independence, besides doing considerable study and 
reading at home. During his school period he devoted the summer months to 
farm labor and while still young began the struggle of life upon his own re- 
sponsibility. It can be truthfully said that, in the best sense of 'the term he is 
a self-made man, as he had no assistance worthy of mention nor the aid of 
influential friends in his efforts to obtain a start in the world. By the exercise 
of those traits of industry and frugality by which he has ever been character- 
ized, he secured a tract of land which he at once proceeded to improve and to 
which he has since added until he now owns a fine farm of one hundred and 
seventy-two acres in Warren township, the greater part in an excellent state 
of cultivation and otherwise well improved. This farm, which adjoins the 
May gravel road, in one of the best agricultural districts of the above town- 
ship, is admirably situated for crops and stock raising and has long been con- 
sidered among the best and most valuable tracts of land of like area in the 
county. 

Mr. Clawson was first married in September, 1866, to Abigail Smith, who 
bore him four children : William, deceased; Emma, deceased, wife of William 
J. Bader; Ida and Abbie, deceased. Sometime after the death of the mother 
of these children Mr. Clawson contracted a matrimonial alliance with Emma 
Cottingham, of Fountain county, the marriage, which was solemnized in 1875, 
being without issue. 

As stated in the initial paragraph, Mr. Clawson was a soldier during the 
late Rebellion and for a period of three years rendered valiant service for 



734 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

his country in a number of campaigns and battles, lie enlisted in 1S62 in the 
Fourth Indiana Cavvalry, which formed a part of the Army of the Cumber- 
land and while at the front bore his full share of the hardships and privations 
which fell to the lot of the men in the ranks, while in many bloody contests lie 
nobly earned the reputation of a brave and gallant soldier. He is a Democrat 
in politics, but not a partisan in the sense of seeking official honors, and in his 
fraternal relations he belongs to the Masonic brotherhood. Some years ago 
he turned his farm over to other hands and retired from active life, since 
which time he lias been living in quiet and content, enjoying the fruits of his 
many years of toil and the confidence and esteem of his fellow nn ,1. 



YOUNG HENRY. 

This farmer and public-spirited citizen is a native of Fountain county, 
Indiana, born February 22, 1848, in Warren township, of which his father, 
Christian H. Henry, was an early settler. Christian Henry, a Virginian by 
birth, came to Indiana when, a young man and entered land in the above town- 
ship, where in due time he developed a good farm and became one of the lead- 
ing agriculturists of the community. His wife, whom lie married in Warren 
county, was Sarah Southard. She bore him seven children, the subject of this 
sketch being the youngest of the number. 

The early experience of Young Henry was like that of most boys reared 
, in the country, presenting the usual routine of work on the farm during the 
summer season, varied by attendance each winter at the district school. He 
made the most of his opportunities in the way of intellectual advancement 
and, though not educated in the usual acceptance of the term, he is neverthe- 
less a well informed man, with a wide and varied knowledge of many sub- 
jects, acquired by much reading and intelligent observation. Reared in close 
touch with the soil, he early decided to make agriculture his life work; ac- 
cordingly, on leaving the parental roof he engaged in that vocation in his 
native township, where he has since resided and where he now owns a beauti- 
ful and highly cultivated farm of eighty acres on which he has erected a com- 
fortable and commodious residence, a substantial barn and other buildings, his 
improvements of all kinds comparing favorably with the best in his part of 
the country. As a tiller of the soil he is careful and observing. By the use of 
modern methods and keeping abreast of the times in matters pertaining to the 
science of agriculture, he has succeeded well in his undertakings and is now 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 735 

in comfortable circumstances with a sufficiency of this world's goods in his 
possession to insure a restful and independent old age. 

Mr. Henry was married on the 18th day of March, 1874, to Nancy Ellen 
Bone, whose parents, Valentine and Mary (Monroe) Bone, moved from 
Ohio to Fountain county a number of years ago and settled in Warren town- 
ship. Five children constitute the family of Mr. and Mrs. Henry, namely: 
Harry, who married Jennie Powell, and is the father of one child by the name 
of Verne; Marvin; Ira married Myrtle Wilkinson, the union resulting in the 
birth of one child, La Von ; Nettie is the wife of John W. Allbright, and the 
mother of two offspring, viz: Tula Marie and Glen Wilson; and Ruth, the 
youngest of the family, is the wife of James Harwood. 

Politically, Mr. Henry is a Democrat, but has never disturbed his quiet 
by becoming a politician Or seeking the honor of public position. Like all good 
citizens, however, he manifests an abiding interest in the great questions 
which concern the welfare of the nation, and has well grounded convictions on 
all matters of public importance. As a neighbor, he is kind and obliging, and 
having always aimed to live in harmony with high ideas of duty, he is greatly 
esteemed and respected in the community, where his friends are as the number 
of his acquaintances. 



EVAN JONES. 



The people who constitute the bone and sinew of this country are not 
those who are unstable and unsettled, who fly from this occupation to that,- 
who do not know where they stand on political questions until they are told 
how to vote, and who take no active and intelligent interest in affairs affecting 
their schools, church and public affairs and general civic problems. The back- 
bone of this country is made up of families who have made their homes ; who 
are alive to the best interests of the community in which they live ; who are so 
honest that it is no trouble for their neighbors to know it ; who attend to 
their own business and are too busy to meddle with that of others: who work- 
steadily on from day to day, taking the sunshine with the storm, and who gain 
an honest name and a comfortable home. Such people are always welcome in 
any country and in any community. They are wealth producers and Warren 
county is blessed with many such. Among them is Evan Jones, of Kent town- 
ship, whose life record is briefly set forth in the following lines. 

Evan Jones was born on the 21st of February, i860, at the paternal home- 
stead in Kent township, and in his youth he was given the benefit of attend- 



736 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

ance in the common schools. As soon as old enough he was required to lend 
a hand at the work of the farm and then and there he learned the lesson's of 
industry, perseverance and patience which have been such important elements 
in his subsequent success. He is the owner of eighty-one acres of land in 
Kent township, eligibly situated and well improved in every respect, so that 
he has reaped abundant harvests from year to year, lie is a thoroughly 
practical man, giving intelligent direction to all his operations and neglecting 
no detail of his work. The residence and farm buildings are all kept in good 
repair and the whole place presents a pleasing and inviting appearance. Air. 
Jones does not confine himself to any particular phase of. agriculture, but is 
diversified in his operations. 

On the 12th of July, 1879, Mr. Jones was united in marriage with Caro- 
line High, who was born on January 11, 1859, the daughter of Abraham and 
Mary (Saylor) High. This union has been without issue. 

Politically, Mr. Jones is a leading Republican of his township and in 
1905 he was appointed township trustee, holding the office about two years 
and a half and giving an intelligent and honest administration of the duties 
of his office. His fraternal relations are with the Free and Accepted Masons, 
holding membership in the blue lodge at State Line. He is a member of the 
Christian church and a liberal s >orter of the same. 

Evan Jones' parents were William and Mary (Logan) Jones, the father 
born on December 11, 1836, and the mother on January 11, 1834. They 
were married on December 25, 1858, and are now living in State Line, where 
they are highly esteemed by all who know them. William Jones is the owner 
of seventy acres of land. 



ELMER E. LEAS. 



Fealty to facts in the analyzation of the character of a citizen is all that 
is required to make a biographical sketch interesting to those who have at 
heart the good name of the community, because it is the honorable reputation 
of the man of standing and affairs, more than any other consideration, that 
gives character and stability to the body politic and makes the true glory of a 
country revered at home and respected abroad. In the broad light which 
things of good report ever invite, the name and character of Elmer E. Leas, 
one of Fountain county's leading young agriculturists and public-spirited citi- 
zens, stand revealed and secure. Though of modest demeanor, with no ambi- 
tion to distinguish himself in public position or as a leader of men, his career 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 737 

lias been signally honorable and it may be studied with profit by the youth 
entering upon his life work or by the discouraged plodding wearily along the 
steeps of life's winding highway, for it shows what one of ambition, deter- 
mination and exemplary character may accomplish even in the face of ob- 
stacles, such as are encountered somewhere on the road to life's goal by all 
terrestrial travelers, soon or late. 

Elmer E. Leas, scion of a sterling old family of this section of the 
Hoosier state, was born in Fountain county, Indiana, March 18, 1876, and is 
the son of Arthur and Mary (Caldwell) Leas. The father was born in this 
county, near the present home of the subject of this sketch, on the old home- 
stead, and here he grew up, was educated in the early schools and spent his 
life engaged successfully in agricultural pursuits and was a highly respected 
citizen, his death occurring here in 1882. Politically, he was a Republican, 
but lived a quiet life and never held office. George and Lydia (Crane) Leas, 
the paternal grandparents of the subject, were among the first settlers in this 
county, coming here when the country was the haunt of the kindreds of the 
wild, before the county had been penetrated by railroads or scarcely any im- 
provements beer. made. They took up land from the government and in due 
course of time had a good farm and here they spent the rest of their lives. 

Elmer E. Leas grew to manhood near Champaign, Illinois, excepting 
four years of his early life, and there assisted with the general work when a 
boy. He had the advantages of a liberal education. He at first attended the 
common schools of his community, later taking a course at Union Christian 
College, Merom, Sullivan county, Indiana, where he spent two and one-half 
years, in the regular course. He subsequently attended the University of 
Illinois at Urbana for two winters. He made an excellent record in these 
institutions and, always a close student, became exceptionally well fitted for 
life's work. He has kept well up with the trend of the times, being a wide 
reader and is well informed on the current topics of the day and acquainted 
with the world's best literature. 

Mr. Leas has devoted his life to agricultural pursuits and he has met 
with eminent success all along the line, and by able management and per- 
sistency has accumulated six hundred acres of valuable and finely improved 
land, all tillable and constituting one of the model farms of the county, and 
he has an attractive home and large, substantial outbuildings. He carries on 
general farming and stock raising in a manner that stamps him as being fully 
abreast of the times in every respect. He feeds and ships cattle and hogs in 
large numbers and no small part of his annual income is derived from that 
source. He is an excellent judge of live stock and understands well their prep- 

(47) 



738 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

aration for market, tie is an advocate of modern methods of agriculture, 
and he has many devices of modern fanning implements and everything is 
up-to-date about the place. 

Mr. Leas was married on June 14, 1899, to Hulda Wildman, the daugh- 
ter of Henry and Sarah E. (Quick) Wildman. He was born in Ohio and she 
in Mi ntgomery county, Indiana. They both died when Mrs. Leas was seven 
years old. Mr. Wildman was a farmer of Piatt county, Illinois, and at his 
death owned six hundred acres of land and was the largest farmer of that 
■community. They had a family of nine children, four of whom are still living. 
He was an active supporter of the Republican party and held county offices. 
They spent all of their married life near Atwood, Illinois. Two children 
have been born to the subject and wife, Clara Lucile and Freeman Arthur. 

Mr. Leas is a Republican, but he has never been very active in party 
affairs and has held no public office, preferring to devote his attention exclu- 
sively to his extensive farming. Fraternally, he belongs to the Knights of 
Pythias of Covington. 



JOHN PERRY. 

The name of John Perry, of Kramer, Indiana, does not need to be intro- 
duced to the readers of this work, for it has been intertwined with the history 
of this locality for many years. The fair measure of success which has come 
to him is directly traceable, to the salient points in his character. Combined 
with well-formed purposes, his energy, discrimination and perseverance 
have resulted in prosperity and his record has been such as to place him among 
the representative citizens of his township. His business methods have been 
in accordance with the highest standard of ethics, so that he has merited the 
esteem in which he is held in the locality. 

John Perry was born near Xenia, Ohio, on March 10, 1856, and is a 
son of Samuel and Lousina (Shaw) Perry. The father, who was born, 
reared and educated in the Buckeye state, was a farmer by vocation, and in 
i860 he brought his family to Hamilton county, Indiana. To him and his 
-wife were born ten children, namely: Martha, deceased; Cynthia, who lives 
in Ohio; Rachael, deceased; Lousetta, deceased; Nancy, deceased; Ebenezcr, 
who lives in Fountain county, Indiana; Lydia, of Kramer; John is the im- 
mediate subject of this sketch; Mrs. Mary Smith, and Samuel. 

John Perry was but four years of age when he became a resident of the 
Hoosier state and here he received his school education. During his boyhood 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 739 

his vacation periods were spent in assisting in the work of the home farm. 
In young manhood he learned the trade of a carpenter, and soon afterwards 
he began contracting, in which line he was successfully engaged for a num- 
ber of years, having erected a large number of the best buildings, both resi- 
dence and business, in this part of the county. He is now interested in a gen- 
eral store at Kramer and is also the incumbent of the office of postmaster. He 
carries a good stock of general merchandise and by his fair dealings and 
courteous treatment of his patrons, he has built up a large and profitable trade, 
drawing his customers from a large radius of territory. As postmaster, he 
is giving eminent satisfaction to the patrons of the office as well as to the 
government. He is a man of many splendid personal qualities of character 
and easily makes friends among his acquaintances. 

Mr. Perry has been twice married, first, to Alice Leslie, by which union 
three children were born, namely : Wyatt, Guy, and Hazel, who became the 
wife of Fred Wilson. Some time after the death of Mrs. Alice Perry, Mr. 
Perry married Alice Glascock, of Veedersburg, Indiana, and to them lias been 
born a son, John. 

Fraternally, Mr. Perry is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias and Modern Wood- 
men of America. Religiously, the members of the family are all identified 
with the Methodist Episcopal church, to which they give a liberal support. 



JONAS WARRENFELT. 

The march of improvement is accelerated day by day, and each suc- 
cessive moment seems to demand of men a broader intelligence and a greater 
discernment than did the preceding, showing that successful men must be live 
men in this age, bristling with activity. The purpose of biography is to pre- 
serve the records of such men for the edification of succeeding generations; 
thus the lessons of biography may be far-reaching to an extent not super- 
ficially evident. The subject of this sketch, who is now numbered among 
the older farmers of the county in point of age, has achieved a creditable rec- 
ord here and because of what he has accomplished and his personal character 
he is entitled to mention in this work. 

Jonas Warrenfelt, who owns about one hundred and sixty acres of fine 
land on the Watkins road, about two miles northwest of Williamsport, was 



740 FOUNTAIN AND WARKEN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

born on December 4, 1837, in Frederick county, Maryland. He is the son of 
Jacob and Mary (Rice) Warren felt, the former of whom was a large land 
owner in Maryland, owning over two hundred acres in Frederick county, and 
never left that state. He was the father of fifteen children. The subject had 
but one brother who grew to maturity, Samuel, who at one time lived in War- 
ren county, Indiana, and who had two sons. The other brothers died in 
their teens. Two sisters are living in Frederick county, Maryland. The 
brother Samuel referred to first came to Warren county, Indiana, in the spring 
of 1871, having purchased the old county farm, northwest of Williamsport. 
He lived there a number of years, then sold it and purchased a farm in Grant 
county, Indiana, where he lived for some years. Then, selling that place, he 
bought a farm in Miami county, Indiana, living there until his wife died, 
when he rented the farm and came to Warn county, making his home for a 
time with his brother Jonas. Later he married Mrs. Mary E. HofT and bought 
land adjoining her farm, where his death occurred several years ago. One 
of his sons, William J., is married and living at Montpelier, Indiana ; the other 
son, Lewis C, lives near Metamora, Ohio. 

The subject of this sketch was reared in his native state and received his 
education in the schools of that locality. In 1872 he came to Indiana and 
bought eighty >acres of land, to which he later added until he is now the owner 
of one hundred and sixty acres. To this he has always given his close atten- 
tion, allowing nothing to divert him from it, and he has always lived in com- 
fort there, enjoying an independence which can be secured in no other line of 
effort. 

On March 17, 1S59, Mr. Warrenfelt was married to Mary E. Moser, in 
Frederick county, Maryland, she being the daughter of Elias and Susan 
(Weller) Moser. There were five children in the Moser family, as follows : 
Mary E., Mrs. Warrenfelt; Ezra V., Isaiah O., Josiah and George W. Josiah 
was a soldier in the Civil war, being wounded in a skirmish in Virginia in 
1865 and dying in Lincoln Hospital, Washington, D. C., soon afterwards. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Warrenfelt was born one child who died in infancy un- 
named. They reared a girl, Flora Yount, who became the wife of Victor 
Cronk, and they became the parents of two children, Hazel and Edward. 

Religiously, Mr. Warrenfelt is a faithful and consistent member of the 
United Brethren church, giving liberally to its support and taking an interest 
in all of its activities. He is a man of splendid personal qualities of character 
and because of his upright life he is eminently deserving of the high regard 
in which he is held throughout the community. 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 741 

CHARLES WAKELEY. 

Devoting his energies to agriculture, the subject of this sketch enjoys 
distinctive prestige as one of the enterprising farmers of Washington town- 
ship, Warren county, Indiana, and in the way of general improvements his 
farm is the equal of any in the neighborhood. Starting with a limited capital, 
but with a liberal endowment of self-reliance, a clear brain, a strong will and 
a determined purpose, he overcame many discouraging circumstances, gradu- 
ally forged to the front and in the course of time found himself on the road 
to the prosperity which he now enjoys. 

Charles Wakeley was born on July 24, 1858, in Liberty township, War- 
ren county, Indiana, and is the son of Daniel and Jane (Hunter) Wakeley. 
Daniel Wakeley was a native of Scotland, coming to the United States when 
he was fourteen years of age. He came direct to Warren county and during 
the rest of his life he was employed as a laborer. He was intensely loyal to 
his adopted country and in 1861 he enlisted in the Seventy-second Regiment 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry, serving valiantly until the close of the conflict. 
Upon his discharge from the army he returned to Warren county, where he 
spent the rest of his days, his death occurring on July 24, 1909. He was the 
father of six children, all sons, namely: Marion; James, deceased; George; 
Charles, the subject of this review ; Samuel, deceased ; Manfred. 

The circumstances under which the subject of this sketch started in life 
were none too favorable, as, owing to the modest condition of the family 
exchequer he was compelled to begin work at the age of seven years. He was 
thus denied some educational advantages that he should have enjoyed, but, 
being a man of keen discernment, he has absorbed a vast amount of general 
information and is the peer of any of his fellows in this respect. He was 
employed by the month at farm labor for twenty-eight years, proving at all 
times a faithful and capable employe. During this time he carefully hus- 
banded his earnings, with a definite object in view, and eventually he was 
enabled to carry out his cherished plans and bought a tract of eighty acres in 
Washington township. To the operation of this splendid farm he is giving 
his undivided attention and that he is achieving a definite success goes without 
saying. He is a practical farmer, understanding all the ins and outs of agri- 
culture, and his efforts are rewarded with abundant returns. The independ- 
ent position in which he is now placed is solely the result of his energy, econ- 
omy and good judgment and he is deserving of the esteem in which he is 
held in the community where he lives. 



742 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Mr. Wakeley was married to Mary E. Fletcher and they have become 
the parents of four children, namely: Grace is the wife of Charles Biser, of 
this township; Gladys is the wife of Philip High, and they have two children, 
Henry L. and Joseph W. ; Goldi< W. is the wife of Elmo Whitten and they 
have one child, Charles Morris; Herman is deceased. 

Politically, Mr. Wakeley gives his support, to the Republican party, 
though not a seeker after office, Religiously, the family arc members of the 
Christian church and are liberal in (heir support of the same. Mr. Wakeley 
is personally a man of splendid qualities and he enjoys to an eminent degree 
the confidence of all who have known him. 



AMOS RINGEL. 



It is a well authenticated fact that success conies as the result of legiti- 
i ate and well applied energy, unflagging determination and perseverance in 
a course of action when once decided upon. She is never known to smile on 
the idler or dreamer and she never courts the loafer, and only the men who 
have diligently sought her faA r or are crowned with her blessings. Jn tracing 
the history of the representative farmer and influential citizen of Washington 
township, Warren county, Indiana, whose name forms the caption of this re- 
view, it is plainly seen that the prosperity which he enjoys has been won by 
commendable qualities and it is also his personal worth that has gained for 
him the high esteem of those who know him. 

Amos Ringel is a native son of the county in which he now resides, 
having been born in Pike township, on the 8th of August, 1867, and is the 
son of George and Mary (Ross) Ringel. George Ringel was a native of 
Germany, where he was reared and educated. In accordance with the custom 
in the fatherland, he served three years in the German army, that being during 
the uprising of 1848. At the age of about twenty-five years he was brought 
to the United States by his father, Yost Ringel, who was a farmer. The 
family first settled in Frederick, Maryland, where Yost Ringel became the 
owner of a farm. George Ringel married in Maryland and subsequently 
came to Pike township, Warren county, Indiana. For seven years here he 
worked at day labor, for which he received as wages seventy-five cents a day 
and boarded himself. However, even under such conditions he showed the 
stuff he was made of and, by dint of the most rigid economy and careful 
management, he saved enough money with which to buy himself a piece of 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 743 

land, seven acres in extent. To the cultivation of that little tract he applied 
himself with such good judgment and care that he was prospered and he was 
enabled to add to his holdings from time to time until eventual!) he was the 
owner of two hundred and forty acres of good land, lie was active all his 
life, idleness being entirely foreign to his nature, and he enjoyed the respect 
of all who knew him. He became the father of seven children, namely: 
Adam; Clara, Mrs. Robertson, of West Lebanon, this count) ; Mary E., Airs. 
Biser, is a widow and makes her home with Adam and Amos Ringel ; George ; 
Amos, the immediate subject of this sketch; Otto, who emigrated to Australia. 
where his death occurred ; Ross, a merchant at West Lebanon. 

Amos and Adam Ringel are members of the Free and Accepted Masons 
and the Knights of Pythias, while, religiously, the family are affiliated wi, 
the Methodist Episcopal church. They are alive to all the interests of the 
community and are numbered with the best people of the township. 



CHARLES F. GRAF. 

One of the thrifty, self-made Germans who have come to Warren county 
and, through their diligence and honest dealings, have become the possessors 
of good property, the name of Charles F. Graf, farmer of Steuben township, 
should be specially mentioned. He has ever lent his aid in furthering the 
better interests of his locality, and he is well fortilied in his political convic- 
tions, while he is essentially public-spirited and progressive. In all the rela- 
tions of life he has been found faithful to every trust confided in him, and 
because of his genuine worth and genial disposition he has won and retains 
the warm regard of all with whom he has been in any way associated. 

Mr. Graf was born in Germany, August 13, 1870, the son of Karl and 
Caroline Graf. He went to school in Germany for seven years and there re- 
ceived most of his education. When thirteen years of age the family emi- 
grated to America, arriving in Champaign, Illinois, December 3, 1883, where 
his father followed the trade of cabinet-maker, Charles F. Graf being em- 
ployed on a farm for eight dollars per month. His mother died in 1S85 at 
the age of forty years. To Karl and Caroline Graf were born five children. 
named as follows: George, who came to America and is now living in 
Crawfordsville, Indiana; Lena is deceased; Charles F., subject of this sketch/; 
Kate married George Frank and they live in Montana; Carrie married Gus 
Buckman and they make their home in Iowa. 



744 FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 

Charles F. Graf married Emma Schumacher, daughter of John and 
Kate (Edens) Schumacher, their wedding occurring on October 16, 1893. 
To this union one child was born, Leonora, who lives at home. The wife and 
mother passed to her eternal rest in 1895, al tne early age of twenty-three 
years, and the subject subsequently married Alnena Schumacher, a sister of 
his first wife, and she passed away in December, 191 1, at the age of thirty- 
seven years, leaving one child, Waldo, who lives at home. 

The Schumacher family came from the province of Holstein, Germany, 
in i860, and settled in Champaign county, near Sidney, Illinois. There were 
eight children in this family, five daughters and three sons, all living but two. 

Politically, rhe subject is a Republican and is a member of the advisory 
board. Fraternally, he belongs to the Free and Accepted Masons, Lodge 
No. 612, at Hedrick. 

Mr. Graf is a self-made man in every respect. He had nothing when he 
came to this country, but he worked hard and was economical and finally got 
a good start. He worked out for a period of thirteen years, for eight dollars 
per month part of that time. But he saved enough out of his wages to buy 
one hundred and sixty acres of good land in Iowa, where he lived four years, 
and while there his first wife died; then he returned to Warren county, Indi- 
ana, and he and his brother farmed five hundred acres for Dr. Eden, of Dan- 
ville. He now owns one hundred and sixty acres of good land in Steuben 
township, well improved and fertile, which is worth two hundred dollars per 
ac. e at the present time. 



GEORGE MELVIN FOSTER. 

George Melvin Foster, a prominent business man of Attica, formerly 
one of the leading farmers of Fountain county, of which he is a native, was 
born in Shawnee township on April 25, 1854. His father was John Lewis 
Foster, a Virginian by birth, and his mother, who prior to her marriage bore 
the name of Catherine Nave, was born in the state of Ohio. James Foster, 
father of John L., moved from Ohio to Fountain county in a very early day, 
entered land which he cleared and improved and in due time became one of 
the prosperous farmers of what is now -Shawnee township. In connection 
with agriculture he was engaged for some years in the river 'trade, having 
made a number of trips by flat boat on the Ohio and Mississippi to New- 
Orleans and intermediate points, where he dealt quite extensively in produce. 
1'ohn L. Foster was an infant six weeks old when his parents settled in Foun- 



FOUNTAIN AND WARREN COUNTIES, INDIANA. 745 

tain county. He was reared to agriculture, which he followed all his life, stood 
high in the confidence and esteem of his neighbors and fellow citizens and for 
many years was a devout member of the Presbyterian church and an elder of 
the local congregation to which he belonged. The family of John Lewis and 
Catherine Foster consisted of three children, the oldest of whom is the gen- 
tleman whose name introduces the sketch. Daniel X., the second in order. of 
birth, is a retired farmer living in Attica, and Mary M., the youngest of the 
number, died in childhood. 

George Melvin Foster's early experience was without special note or 
striking incident, his childhood and youth having been similar to that of most 
boys whose good fortune it was to be born and reared under the wholesome 
discipline of rural life. He first attended the district school near his home in 
Shawnee township, later pursued his studies for some time in the graded 
schools of Attica and at the proper age took up farming on the family 
homestead, where he lived and prospered until 1910, a period of about thirty- 
five or thirty-seven consecutive years. During the time indicated he made sub- 
stantial progress as a tiller of the soil and raiser of live stock, the meanwhile 
adding to his real estate until his farm amounted to about five hundred and 
sixty acres of as fine land as the township of Shawnee can boast, all of which 
he still owns. All but seventy acres is in cultivation and well improved. 

Turning' the management of his farm over to bis sons. Mr. Foster in 
1910 moved to Attica